• Hinckley & District Museum
  • Framework Knitters` Cottages
  • Lower Bond Street
  • Hinckley
  • Leicestershire
  • LE10 1QU
  • e-mail hinckleymuseum@hotmail.co.uk
  • Tel. 01455 251218 [open days only]

“Nobody Told Us”




Hinckley
FIRST WORLD WAR

ROLL OF HONOUR

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Gregory Drodz

Private Job Abbott 16337
Killed in Action 25th September 1915
2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment
Loos Memorial to the Missing, France
Panels 42 to 44
Age 34
Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester
Son of Mr. Job Adam and Mrs. Mary Abbott, Spring Gardens, Hinckley.
Baptist Chapel Memorial
1911 Census: He was living at 66 Oxford Street, Leicester as a boarder with a Mr and Mrs Bunney. His occupation is recorded as a Hosiery Warehouse Counterman.
Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 19th March 1915.
Army Registers of Effects: His father received a payment of £9 13s 15d on 10th July 1917. He also received a war gratuity of £3 on 23rd September 1919.
Lance Corporal Thomas Adcock 4621
Died at Home 7th November 1915
C Company 3rd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment
Hull Western Cemetery, Yorkshire
Grave 537.51858
Age 39
Born Market Bosworth Enlisted Leicester Living in Hinckley
Son of Mrs. Hannah Adcock, 40 Chapel Street, Barwell.
His name was originally missed off Hinckley War Memorial but was added in October 2005
Private James Trevor Allen 24184 Military Medal
Killed in Action 15th March 1917
1/4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment
Fonquevilliers Military Cemetery, France
Plot 3 Row E Grave 9
Age 20
Born Burton upon Trent Enlisted Loughborough Living in Sketchley
Son of Mr. George and Mrs. Jessie Allen, New Cottages, Sketchley, Hinckley.
1911 Census: He was living on Swannington Road, Ravenstone with his parents. He had no occupation but had left school.
Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.
HINCKLEY TIMES 14TH APRIL 1917 :

Private James Trevor Allen of the Leicestershire Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs George Allen, Sketchley, was killed in action in France on March 15th. The deceased was formerly in the employ of Messrs. Parson Sherwin and Co, ironmongers of Hinckley. He joined the army two years ago and went out to France last May.

A few days prior to his death he was awarded the Military Medal for devotion to duty and conspicuous gallantry. On March 2nd 1917 at Gommecourt, when attacked by a strong enemy bombing party, far superior in number to our own, Private Allen by his coolness and presence of mind, undoubtedly saved the lives of two of his comrades. Two of the men were covered by the rifles of the enemy and they immediately opened fire on them, wounding one severely. Allen also continued bombing the enemy when our own party had temporarily withdrawn.

Second-Lieutenant T. H. Ball of the Leicesters, writing to the bereaved Mother says: “As his platoon officer I may say that he was a fine soldier ever ready to do his duty and always cheerful and happy. He had just been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in action, saving the lives of two of his comrades. I was present at his burial which was performed to the rites of the Church of England”. Lieutenant-Colonel C H Jones of the Leicesters has also written to Mrs. Allen as follows: “It was especially sad seeing that he had just won the Military Medal. Today the general came to present ribbons to men who had won the medals and he gave me the enclosed for you. Your son knew he had won the medal the day before he died. He is entitled to it and it will come to you in due course. This is just the ribbon the General gave the men to wear. Your son was with us just one year and he always did his duty. The medal is sufficient to show that. He happened to be standing near his dugout when a shell pitched right in the road, a piece hit him and he died instantly. He died in the evening about six o’clock and you will get the record of his grave if you write to the Director of Graves Registration. Parents have had a very anxious time in this war and it is sad when then young people are cut-off in this fashion. You have the sympathy of us all.”

War Diary : of the 1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment (WO95/2690/2) recorded that:
Fonquevilliers : – March 14th 1917 – Much rain during the day. One Hun Howitzer shell fell in the road near H Quarters and caused 7 casualties in D Company. Pte Allen killed. An isolated shell. and later:
Rainnevilliers : 25th March 1917 – GOC came and presented ribbons for 4 Military medals. Pte. J T Allen had been killed. The ribbon was sent to the last name’s Father.
The cemetery register at Fonquevilliers had at one time a handwritten note in it against his name:” One of D Company’s best bombers. One other killed and 55 wounded by the same howitzer shell landing in Fonquevilliers.”
Army Registers of Effects : The sum of 32 18s 2d was paid to his mother on 6th June 1917.She also received a war gratuity of £8 10s on 28th October 1919.
Lance-Corporal Leonard Almey 10466
Died of Wounds 31st October 1916
6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment
Etaples Cemetery, France
Plot 12 Row B Grave 9
Age 36
Born Leicester Enlisted Wrexham Living in Hinckley
Brother of Annie Dunn, Christowe Street, Wrexham.
Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)
1911 Census : He was living with his sister’s family at 15 Providence Place, Leicester and was employed as an Iron Foundry Labourer.
Medal Card Index : Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He went to France on 29th July 1915.
Army Registers of Effects: His sister received a payment of £16 11s 9d on 27th February 1917 and a war gratuity of £9 10s on 6th October 1919.
Private William Amey 10391
Killed in Action 31st October 1916
6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment
Thiepval Memorial to the Missing
Pier 2 Face C Pier 3 Face A
Born Fulham, London Enlisted Hinckley Living Chelsea, London
Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)
1911 Census: He was living at 7 Clarendon Road, Hinckley and is employed was a Domestic Groom to the Stubbs family.
Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 29th July 1915.
Service Record: He was aged 26 and was employed as a Domestic. He had previous service in the Leicestershire Regiment. He rejoined the Regiment on 28th August 1914. He was relieved of 3 days pay for misconduct on 29th September 1914 and again he was deprived of 7 days pay for misconduct on 2nd June 1915. He was 5ft 31/2 inches tall He was admitted to the 48th Field Ambulance on 30th August 1915 with scabies and was discharged on 10th September 1915. His mother, Mrs Harriet Amey lived at 1 Blantyre Street, Chelsea, London, where his brother Alfred Amey also lived. His sister lived at 17 Clarendon Road, Hinckley.
Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £4 11s 9d on 19th February 1917 and a war gratuity of £9 on 10th October 1919.
Private Sydney Ashbourne 8687
Killed in Action 25th September 1915
2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment
Loos Memorial to the Missing, France
Panels 42 – 44
Age 26
Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living in Hinckley
Son of Mrs. Lucy Ashbourne, Hinckley.
Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)
1911 Census : He was living at 1 Taylor’s Yard, Castle Street with his mother and sister and was described as a soldier.
Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star.
Service Record:

He enlisted in May 1909 at the age of 21. He was 5ft 93/4 inches tall. After enlistment he served in Shorncliffe, Aldershot and then in India at Plassey, Belgaum, Madras, Bareilly and Ranikant. In April 1912 he spent six days in hospital with suspected malaria but there were no physical signs of disease. In January 1913 he spent 7 days in hospital with malaria at Madras. In January 1914 he spent 10 days in hospital with the same disease at Bareilly. He arrived in France with his battalion on 12th October 1914. He was wounded in the back on 25th November 1914 and was admitted to the No 1 General Hospital at Le Harve on that day. He was transferred to the Hospital Ship Asturias on 30th November 1914. He was posted as Private to the 2nd Battalion on 6th January 1915. He returned to France on 20th March 1915. He was initially posted as Missing but was later officially accepted as killed in action. His mother Lucy Ashbourne lived at Taylors Yard, Castle Street along with his sister Emma. A later address of 4 Crown and Anchor Yard is given for his mother. His sister had moved to 27 Waterloo Square, Hinckley by the time of his demise. No Father is mentioned at all in the record.

HINCKLEY TIMES 6TH JANUARY 1917 :

Private Sidney Ashbourne of the Leicesters, a Hinckley man, is now presumed dead as a result of the action at Loos on September 25th, 1915. A letter to this effect has been received by Mrs. Atkins of 40 Stockwell Head, with whom he lodged prior to the war. Private Ashbourne was 26 years of age and had a record of 7 years with the army. He was sent out to India in 1910 and proceeded to France with the Expeditionary Force on the outbreak of the war. Two years ago he was wounded in the back and spent a few days in Hinckley recovering before returning to France. Some years ago he was employed by Mr. J D C Ward, Veterinary Surgeon, Mount Road and in his school days he was a “Hinckley Times” newsboy.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother and sister, now Mrs Emma Baker, both received the sums of £10 1s 1d on 11th January 1918. His mother received his war gratuity of £6 on 17th November 1919.