• Hinckley & District Museum
  • Framework Knitters` Cottages
  • Lower Bond Street
  • Hinckley
  • Leicestershire
  • LE10 1QU
  • e-mail hinckleymuseum@hotmail.co.uk
  • Tel. 01455 251218 [open days only]

“Nobody Told Us”

 

 

HINCKLEY

FIRST WORLD WAR

ROLL OF HONOUR

 

Private Job Abbott 16337

Killed in Action 25th September 1915

2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Loos Memorial to the Missing, France

Panels 42 to 44

Age 34

Born Hinckley

Enlisted Leicester

Son of Mr. Adam Job and Mrs. Mary Abbott, Spring Gardens, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial

1911 Census: He was living at 66 Oxford Street, Leicester as a boarder with a Mr and Mrs Bunney. His occupation is recorded as a Hosiery Warehouse Counterman.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 19th March 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His father received a payment of £9 13s 15d on 10th July 1917. He also received a war gratuity of 3 23rd September 1919.

 

Lance Corporal Thomas Adcock 4621

Died at Home 7th November 1915

C Company 3rd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Hull Western Cemetery, Yorkshire

Grave 537.51858

Age 39

Born Market Bosworth Enlisted Leicester Living in Hinckley

Son of Mrs. Hannah Adcock, 40 Chapel Street, Barwell.

His name was originally missed off Hinckley War Memorial but was added in October 2005

 

Private James Trevor Allen 24184

MILITARY MEDAL

Killed in Action 15th March 1917

1/4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Fonquevilliers Military Cemetery, France

Plot 3 Row E Grave 9

Age 20

Born Burton upon Trent Enlisted Loughborough Living in Sketchley

Son of Mr. George and Mrs. Jessie Allen, New Cottages, Sketchley, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living on Swannington Road, Ravenstone with his parents. He had no occupation but had left school.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 14TH APRIL 1917

Private James Trevor Allen of the Leicestershire Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs George Allen, Sketchley, was killed in action in France on March 15th. The deceased was formerly in the employ of Messrs. Parson Sherwin and Co, ironmongers of Hinckley. He joined the army two years ago and went out to France last May.

A few days prior to his death he was awarded the Military Medal for devotion to duty and conspicuous gallantry. On March 2nd 1917 at Gommecourt, when attacked by a strong enemy bombing party, far superior in number to our own, Private Allen by his coolness and presence of mind, undoubtedly saved the lives of two of his comrades. Two of the men were covered by the rifles of the enemy and they immediately opened fire on them, wounding one severely. Allen also continued bombing the enemy when our own party had temporarily withdrawn.

Second-Lieutenant T. H. Ball of the Leicesters, writing to the bereaved Mother says: “As his platoon officer I may say that he was a fine soldier ever ready to do his duty and always cheerful and happy. He had just been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in action, saving the lives of two of his comrades. I was present at his burial which was performed to the rites of the Church of England”.

Lieutenant-Colonel C H Jones of the Leicesters has also written to Mrs. Allen as follows: “It was especially sad seeing that he had just won the Military Medal. Today the general came to present ribbons to men who had won the medals and he gave me the enclosed for you. Your son knew he had won the medal the day before he died. He is entitled to it and it will come to you in due course. This is just the ribbon the General gave the men to wear. Your son was with us just one year and he always did his duty. The medal is sufficient to show that. He happened to be standing near his dugout when a shell pitched right in the road, a piece hit him and he died instantly. He died in the evening about six o’clock and you will get the record of his grave if you write to the Director of Graves Registration. Parents have had a very anxious time in this war and it is sad when then young people are cut-off in this fashion. You have the sympathy of us all.”

The cemetery register at Fonquevilliers had at one time a handwritten note in it against his name:” One of D Company’s best bombers. One other killed and 55 wounded by the same howitzer shell landing in Fonquevilliers.”

Army Registers of Effects: The sum of 32 18s 2d was paid to his mother on 6th June 1917.She also received a war gratuity of £8 10s on 28th October 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal Leonard Almey 10466

Died of Wounds 31st October 1916

6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Etaples Cemetery, France

Plot 12 Row B Grave 9

Age 36

Born Leicester Enlisted Wrexham Living in Hinckley

Brother of Annie Dunn, Christowe Street, Wrexham.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: he was living with his sister’s family at 15 Providence Place, Leicester and was employed as an Iron Foundry Labourer.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He went to France on 29th July 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His sister received a payment of £16 11s 9d on 27th February 1917 and a war gratuity of £9 10s on 6th October 1919.

 

Private William Amey 10391

Killed in Action 31st October 1916

6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing

Pier 2 Face C Pier 3 Face A

Born Fulham, London Enlisted Hinckley Living Chelsea, London

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He is living at 7 Clarendon Road, Hinckley and is employed as a Domestic Groom to the Stubbs family.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 29th July 1915.

Service Record: He was aged 26 and was employed as a chauffeur. He had previous service in the Leicestershire Regiment. He rejoined the Regiment on 28th August 1914. He was relieved of 3 days pay for misconduct on 29th September 1914 and again he was deprived of 7 days pay for misconduct on 2nd June 1915. He was 5ft 31/2 inches tall

He was admitted to the 48th Field Ambulance on 30th August 1915 with scabies and was discharged on 10th September 1915.

His mother, Mrs Harriet Amey lived at 1 Blantyre Street, Chelsea, London, where his brother Alfred Amey also lived. His sister lived at 17 Clarendon Road, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £4 11s 9d on 19th February 1917 and a war gratuity of £9 on 10th October 1919.

 

 

Private Sydney Ashbourne 8687

Killed in Action 25th September 1915

2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Loos Memorial to the Missing, France

Panels 42 – 44

Age 26

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living in Hinckley

Son of Mrs. Lucy Ashbourne, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: he was living at 1 Taylor’s Yard, Castle Street with his mother and sister and was described as a soldier.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star.

Service Record: He enlisted in May 1909 at the age of 21. He was 5ft 93/4 inches tall. After enlistment he served in Shorncliffe, Aldershot and then in India at Plassey, Belgaum, Madras, Bareilly and Ranikant. In April 1912 he spent six days in hospital with suspected malaria but there were no physical signs of disease. In January 1913 he spent 7 days in hospital with malaria at Madras. In January 1914 he spent 10 days in hospital with the same disease at Bareilly. He arrived in France with his battalion on 12th October 1914. He was wounded in the back on 25th November 1914 and was admitted to the No 1 General Hospital at le Harve on that day. He was transferred to the Hospital Ship Asturias on 30th November 1914.  He was posted as private to the 2nd Battalion on 6th January 1915. He returned to France on 20th March 1915. He was initially posted as Missing but was later officially accepted as killed in action. His mother Lucy Ashbourne lived at Taylors Yard, Castle Street along with his sister Emma. A later address of 4 Crown and Anchor Yard is given for his mother. His sister had moved to 27 Waterloo Square, Hinckley by the time of his demise. No Father is mentioned at all in the record.

HINCKLEY TIMES 6TH JANUARY 1917

Private Sidney Ashbourne of the Leicesters, A Hinckley man, is now presumed dead as a result of the action at Loos on September 25th, 1915. A letter to this effect has been received by Mrs. Atkins of 40 Stockwell Head, with whom he lodged prior to the war. Private Ashbourne was 26 years of age and had a record of 7 years with the army. He was sent out to India in 1910 and proceeded to France with the Expeditionary Force on the outbreak of the war. Two years ago he was wounded in the back and spent a few days in Hinckley recovering before returning to France. Some years ago he was employed by Mr. J D C Ward, Veterinary Surgeon, Mount Road and in his school days he was a “Hinckley Times” newsboy.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother and sister, now Mrs Emma Baker, both receive the sums of £10 1s 1d on 11th January 1918. His mother received his war gratuity of £6 on 17th November 1919.

 

class=MsoNoSpacing>Gunner Bert Ashby 98938

Died of Wounds 8th June 1915

80th Battery Royal Field Artillery

Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, France

Plot 8 Row A Grave 73

Age 18

Born Melton Mowbray Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr. Walter and Mrs Sarah Kate Ashby, 43 Rugby Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Memorial, Hinckley.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War medal and 1914- 1915 Star. He first went to France on 10th March 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 19TH JUNE 1915

It is announced that Gunner Bert Ashby 983978 of the Royal Field Artillery has died of wounds received in action. Ashby was 18 years of age. At the declaration of the war he was with his mother, Mrs Ashby-Toon at 88 Coventry Road, Hinckley. He enlisted early in the war to serve his country and trained principally at Newcastle. After two days at Woolwich he left for France. He saw much active service and was in one of the big fights in which he and his fellow gunners were blown up, Ashby and his Captain being the only ones to escape. To use his own words: “They fortunately came out without a scratch”.

In Belgium, Ashby appeared to be both day and night under fire from the German guns. He was once blown out of his dugout. In spite of the very narrow escapes he must have had, his letters to his Mother were particularly bright. He once jocularly remarked that the Germans could blow up their little houses but they could not wipe the smiles from the faces of the British.

Ashby was wounded on the 28th May and was sent to the General Hospital in Boulogne, suffering from severe wounds to the right hand and to the left knee from shrapnel. It was necessary to amputate his leg and fears were entertained that amputation of the arm would be necessary. Ashby’s mother was informed of his death by letters from the Nurses and a Mrs. Northcote, as well as by the Chaplain. The sister at the Hospital states that the cemetery in which he is buried is very nicely situated.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a sum of £4 15s on 29th September 1915 and then as Mrs. Sarah K Ashby-Toon, a war gratuity of £3 on 16th August 1918.

 

Private Charles Ashby 26067

Killed in Action 1st October 1917

9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Panels 50 to 51

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

His name was originally missed of Hinckley war Memorial but was added in October 2005

1911 Census: He was living at 97 Curzon Street in Leicester with his mother and sister and was employed as a builder.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal

 

Private Albert Henry Ashton 17393

Killed in Action 24th March 1918

2/4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Age 20

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr James and Mrs Alice M Ashton, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at Dog and Gun Yard, Hinckley and was still at school. He had four siblings – Grace, Thomas, Alfred and Frederick.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a sum of £34 9s 2d on 14th October 1919 which included a war gratuity of £19 10s.

 

Private Reginald Victor Atkins 240882

Killed in Action 27th September 1917

2/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Panels 50 – 51

Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Alfred and Mrs Emma Atkins, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Holy Trinity Memorial

1911 Census: He is registered as living at Vincent Terrace, Station Road, Hinckley. He was employed within a Dyeworks. He has two siblings – Lily and Thomas.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His father received a sum of £5 9s 11d on 7th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £14 on 7th November 1919.

 

Private Arthur Attenborough 9719

Killed in Action 3rd September 1916

2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, France

Pier and Faces 9A, 9B and 10B

Age 31

Born Nuneaton Enlisted Coventry Living in Hinckley

Son of Mr Herman Arthur and Mrs Eliza Attenborough, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Mary Ann L Jeffcote (formerly Attenborough), Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Memorial, Hinckley.

Census 1911: He was living at 91 Druid Street, Hinckley with his parents, although he was married. He is recorded a second time in the census as living at the Lawns, Hinckley with his wife Mary Ann Attenborough and is recorded as a Shoe Hand Finisher.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star (with clasp). He first arrived in France on 22nd August 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES 30TH SEPTEMBER 1916

Mrs. Attenborough of 22 Mansion Street has been officially notified that her husband Corporal Arthur Attenborough of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment was killed in action on September 3rd. The deceased was the son of Mr. Herman Attenborough of 91 Duke Street, who has now lost two sons in the war, Private Walter Attenborough being killed exactly 12 months ago. The only remaining son of the family has been at the Front since the outbreak of the war.

The late Corporal Attenborough was 32 years of age. He had seen 13 years service with the colours. He was called up as a reservist at the outbreak of the war and was amongst the first of the regiments of the Expeditionary Force to land on foreign soil. He went through the memorable fighting of the early part of the campaign and has since ben twice wounded and twice gassed. No particulars have been received by his wife as to how he met his death.

Though he received such a cruel buffeting, Corporal Attenborough was always in the best of spirits and took discomforts and hardships of foreign service with cheerfulness that is characteristic of the British soldier. Before the war he worked at Anstey Hall Colliery, near Nuneaton.

 

The Vicar of Holy Trinity Church in Hinckley, Rev J F Griffiths, throughout the course of the war produced a “Soldiers’ Edition” of the parish magazine. In it were printed letters from servicemen to the Vicar and one of those letters contained an eyewitness of how Arthur Attenborough met his death:

“Dear Sir,

I was proceeding to my company after operations on the 3rd inst, when I saw Corporal Attenborough with Private Conroy of the same company coming back to the Field Ambulance. They were both wounded. Corporal Attenborough was then wounded in the arm and hand. When coming back to my company to the ration dump, I heard someone calling for help. Private Conroy had been again badly wounded and Corporal Attenborough was killed with the same shell….I went over to see him, he was quite dead. It must have been a very quick death; he lay so peacefully and looked so nice, with a pleasant smile on his face. I laid him in a place where he could be easily seen by the burial party burying the dead and I covered him with an oil sheet.

All the old men of the company are always talking about how sad it was meeting his death on going back to the dressing station after being wounded. I can assure you that he was a first class soldier.”

E HAWKIN, QUARTER MASTER SERGEANT September 23rd 1916

 

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £3 6s 6d on 28th December 1916. She also received a war gratuity of £11 10s on 9th October 1919.

 

 

Private Richard Frederick Attenborough 7693

Killed in Action 15th September 1916

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Guards Cemetery, Les Boeufs, France

Plot 11 Row S Grave 5

Age 29

Born Hinckley

Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Son of Mr and Mrs H A Attenborough

Primitive Methodist Memorial

London and North Western Region Roll of Honour

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: he is living with his parents at 91 Druid Street and his occupation is described as Army. He has three siblings – Arthur, Walter and Alma.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal. He first went to France on 9th September 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES 14TH OCTOBER 1916

For Mr and Mrs Herman Attenborough of 91 Druid Street, Hinckley, bereavement follows bereavement. Only a week ago we announced the death of Arthur Attenborough of the Warwickshire Regiment. Now, coms the news that another son, Private Frederick Attenborough of the Leicestershire Regiment, fell in the fighting on the Somme on September 15th. This completely wipes out the Attenborough family so far as the three sons are concerned.

Private Richard Frederick Attenborough was 29 years of age. He had seen considerable service with the colours and had only recently returned to civilian life for a period of three months when he was called on as reserve to rejoin the meantime he had secured employment as a porter at Hinckley railway station. He w2as immediately sent to France and went through the thick of the fighting. It is now ascertained that the late Private Attenborough, whose death we recorded last week, was promoted Sergeant on the field of battle and was buried as a Sergeant. His younger brother was killed in September of last year. In addition to her three sons, Mrs. Attenborough has recently lost a nephew whose Father, is at present lying dangerously ill.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received two payments of £34 12s 15d on 3rd January 1917 and 2s on 5th December 1917. He also received a war gratuity of £12 on 5th December 1919.

 

Private Walter George Attenborough 15494

Killed in Action 25th September 1915

2nd Battalion Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy, France

Plot 2 Row B Grave 4

Age 26

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley Living Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Son of Mr Herman Arthur and Mrs Eliza Attenborough, 91 Druid Street, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Memorial

Holy Trinity Memorial

1911 Census: He is living with his parents at 91 Druid Street, Hinckley and his occupation is described as Barber. He has three siblings – Arthur, Frederick and Alma.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 16TH OCTOBER 1915

Mr H A Attenborough of Druid Street has received official notification that his son, Private Walter George Attenborough of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry was killed in action in France on September 25th. Attenborough was 26 years of age and was well known in Hinckley and neighbourhood. Many years ago he was an assistant to Mr. Priddy at the latter’s hairdressing saloon and was later similarly engaged at Nuneaton, Bedford and Portsmouth. He joined the army as a barber soon after the declaration of war and at the time of his death had been in the firing line for five months. The greatest sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents, another of whose sons is Lance-Corporal Arthur Attenborough of the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment who was sent home some time ago to recover from the effects of gas poisoning.

Mrs. Attenborough has received the following letter from Private W Du Farr, a comrade of the deceased soldier, concerning the latter’s death: “No doubt you will be surprised to hear from me to communicate with you in the event of anything happening to him. It is now my painful duty to have to write to you of your poor boy’s death…he was killed in action with many of our poor fellows last Saturday, the 25th. I am at present unable to give you any details, all that I can say is that he died doing his duty. He was well liked by his comrades and one and all are grieved to hear of his death. I am very sorry to have to write to you with such painful news. I will close now expressing the deepest sympathy of myself and comrades”.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £4 15s 11d on 11th January 1916 and a war gratuity of £3 10 on 5th August 1919.

 

Sergeant Arthur Baggott 53441

Killed in Action 22nd October 1917

15th Battalion Durham Light Infantry formerly 27975 Leicestershire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Age 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley Living Hinckley

Son of Mr. Matthew and Mrs Mary Ann Baggott, 56 Derby Road, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs. Lilla Baggott, 12 John Street, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 2 Victoria Street, Hinckley with his parents. His occupation is recorded as Hosiery Worker Seamless Hand. He had 8 siblings – Emma, George, Florrie, Lily, Edith, Ethel, Matthew and Albert.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He enlisted on 10th December 1915. He was living at 12 John Street, at the time. He was held on reserve until 13th April 1916 when he went to the barracks at Glen Parva and joined the 7th Training Reserve Battalion. On 15th April 1916 he was transferred to the South Staffordshire Regiment at Rugeley Camp and was appointed paid acting Lance-Corporal on 23rd June 1916. He was appointed Acting Corporal on 14th August 1916. He was posted to the Yorkshire Regiment as Acting Corporal on 1stc September 1916 and promoted to Corporal on 11th December 1916. He was transferred to the Durham Light Infantry at Etaples in France as a Corporal on 20th December 1916 and joined his battalion in the field on 24th December 1916. He joined the battalion in the field as an acting Sergeant and was promoted Sergeant on 3rd May 1917.

At enlistment he stood 5ft 7ins tall. He married Lily Growdridge on 14th October 1911. They had three children – William Arthur (6/4/12), Stanley (25/9/13) and Harry Matthew (11/2/1915).The record records his Grandmother Mrs. Emma Baggott of 27 Charles Street, Hinckley and his aunt Mrs. Elsie Moore of 47 John Street, Hinckley.

His widow received a pension of £3 2s 1d a week from 13th October 1918.

HINCKLEY TIMES 15TH DECEMBER 1917

Official news has been received of the death in action of Sergeant Arthur Baggott with the Durham Light Infantry on October 22nd. He was the son of Mr and Mrs Baggott of 56 Derby Road. The deceased leaves a widow and family of young children who reside at 12 John Street.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a sum of £9 17s 4d on 8th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £9 10s on 12th November 1919.

 

Private Arthur William Bailey 16445

Killed in Action 25th September 1915

2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Loos Memorial to the Missing, France

Panels 42 to 44

Age 25

He was born in Hinckley, enlisted in Leicester and he was living in Hinckley

Unitarian Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

He arrived in France on 4th May 1915

1911 Census: He was living at 17 Orchard Street, Hinckley with his parents, John and Eliza Bailey. He had three brothers – Percy John Bailey (17), Harry Bailey (16) and Walter Bailey (14). His occupation was given as a cardboard maker’s assistant.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star

Great Meeting Chapel – Calendar – January 1917

On Thursday December 21st, Mr and Mrs John Bailey received information from the War Office that their son, Private Arthur W Bailey, was now presumed killed from the date on which he was reported missing viz, September 25th 1915. Arthur was 24 years of age and joined the forces at the end of December 1914. This was the last we saw of him, as he was soon sent to France, attached to the 2nd Leicesters, Meerut Division of the Indian Expeditionary Force. He took part in the fight for the Hohenzollern Redoubt in September and was then reported missing.

He was one of the most self-giving workers in our Sunday School, an efficient teacher and one of our most loyal worshippers in the Chapel. It was with the same thorough and conscientious spirit that he joined the army. Today, we mourn his loss, not in one circle, but in many and as Sunday School and Congregation, our heartfelt sympathy goes out to his father and mother to his brothers and those dear to him.

“Greater Love has no man than this”

Great Meeting Chapel – Calendar – February 1917

A memorial service to the late Private Arthur W Bailey was held in the Chapel on Sunday evening, January 7th. The teachers and scholars of our Sunday School joined with the congregation in paying our last tribute to him whom we so truly loved. The solo, “O Rest in the Lord” was rendered by Mrs SW Tompkin and the “Dead March” in Saul was played by the organist, Mrs. R Burgess.

HINCKLEY TIMES 1ST JANUARY 1917

Mr and Mrs Bailey of 17 Orchard Street have been officially notified that their eldest son Private Arthur William Bailey is now presumed dead after being missing since 25th September 1915. The late Private Bailey who belonged to the Leicesters took part in the memorable engagement at Loos and was never seen again.

Army Register of Effects: £6 2s 9d was paid to his father on 31st October 1917. A war gratuity of £3 was paid to his father on the 15th October 1919.

 

Private Ernest Bailey 6853

Killed in Action 25th October 1914

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Panel 4

Age 29

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Mark and Mrs Louisa Bailey, Hinckley. Husband of Lily Bailey, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 39 Manor Street, Hinckley and was employed as a Hosiery Hand. He had 10 siblings – William, Elizabeth, Matthew, Dennis, Alfred, Walter, Edith, Florence, Stephen and Lance.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star.. He first went to France on 9th September 1914.

Service Record: He had first enlisted on 17th February 1903 aged 18. He was 5ft 51/4 inches in height. He had served abroad and was returned to the reserve on 16th February 1911. He mobilised on 5th August 1914 at Leicester. His father and mother lived at 34 Bond Street in 1903.He married Lily Beasley on 24th August 1913. His widow was paid a pension of 10/- per week from 24th May 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 28TH NOVEMBER 1914

Private Ernest Bailey 68533 was killed in action whilst serving with the 1st Battalion Leicestershire regiment at “a place not stated” on October 25th. Bailey was 30 years of age. Until the declaration of war he was employed as a seamless hand at the hosiery firm of Messrs. Moore Eady Murcott Goode in Stockwell Head. He was a smart promising youth whose death will generally be regretted locally. Whilst serving with his regiment some years ago he was a telegraph clerk and an excellent shot. Then unfortunate soldier had only been married for 12 months. His young wife to whom much sympathy has been conveyed lives at 12 Queens Park.

Note from the Hinckley Times: “ During the night of 25th October the Leicestershire Regiment was forward from their trenches, when they came under heavy shell fire and after investigation by the general officers commanding 16th and 17th Infantry brigades it was decided to throw back the lines temporarily in the neighbourhood.”

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £4 19s on 16th March 1915 and a war gratuity of £5 on 23rd June 1919.

 

Private Herbert Bailey 40695

Killed in Action 15th September 1917

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Vermelles British Cemetery, Bethune, France

Plot 5 Row E Grave 32

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his brother in law and his sister Clara at 61 Clarendon Road, Hinckley.His occupation was given as Puller Over. He was aged 24.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He enlisted on 16th November 1914. His height was 5ft 6ins. His mother Sarah Ann Hurst lived at 113 Derby Road, Hinckley. He had 4 siblings at home - Elsie, Ada, Edith Lizzie and William. His occupation was given as Cotton Hand.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother, Mrs. Sarah A Hurst, received a payment of £5 17s 7d on 3rd May 1917 and a war gratuity of £9 on 22nd September 1919.

 

Private Horace Cyril Bailey 419044

Killed in Action 15th September 1916

42nd Battalion Quebec Regiment Canadian Expeditionary Force

The Vimy Memorial to the Missing, France

Age 24

He was the son of Alfred and Emma Bailey, Hinckley.

United Reformed Memorial, Hinckley

Unitarian Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Great Meeting Chapel – Calendar - November 1916:

Private Horace Bailey

, aged 23, was killed in action in France on Friday September 15th, we extend our deep sympathy from the Chapel and School to Mr and Mrs Bailey in their sorrow. Another son of theirs, Sergeant Herbert Bailey was wounded and taken prisoner early in the war and is now with the exchanged prisoners of war in Switzerland.

Service Record from the Canadian Archives:

Born 18th July 1892

Single. Aged 22 years at enlistment, he was employed as a Grocer’s Clerk.

He had served four years in the Leicestershire Territorials.

He enlisted on 31st May 1915 and sailed for England on 10th June 1915.

From 1stt August 1915 to 7th September 1915 he is treated in hospital at Shorncliffe for venereal disease.

From 6th October 1915 to 19th October 1915 he is treated in hospital for chancroid.

He sailed for France on 1st November 1915. On 18th December 1915 he attended grenade school. On 8th February 1916 he was treated at the Divisional rest Station at Locre, Belgium for influenza. He was discharged on the 12th February and proceeded to rejoin his unit.

On 27th February 1916 he was treated at a field ambulance for Laryngitis.

He was discharged on 3rd March 1916 and proceeded to rejoin his unit. On 26th June 1916 he was given 9 days leave in London.

HINCKLEY TIMES 14TH OCTOBER 1916

Private Horace Bailey, third son of Mr and Mrs Bailey of 58 Rugby Road, formerly of the Town Hall Arms, was killed in action with the Canadians in France on September 15th. Horace and his brother Herbert were in Montreal, Canada, at the outbreak of the war. The latter, who had previously distinguished himself with the Leicesters, immediately enlisted in the Royal Highlanders and was soon promoted Sergeant. He was wounded in the fighting of the earlier part of the campaign and was taken prisoner by the Germans. He is now in Switzerland as one of the exchanged prisoners of war. As soon as Horace heard that Herbert had fallen into the hands of the Huns he also enlisted with the Royal Highlanders to take his brother’s place. Since arriving at the battlefield in France he has fought in many engagements. He was well known in Hinckley before emigrating to Canada four years ago. He worked in Leicester at Bates’ Rubber Mill. He was 23 years of age.

 

 

Lance-Corporal Thomas Bailey 23719

Killed in Action 17th April 1918

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Panels 50 to 51

Age 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester

Primitive Methodist Memorial, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents Mr Thomas and Mrs Ann Bailey at 19 Canning Street, Hinckley. His occupation was given as Hosiery Hand.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal

MH106 – National Archives : He suffered a gunshot wound to the right side of his back and was evacuated to England for treatment. He was admitted to the Military Hospital at Carrington in Nottinghamshire on 24th July 1916.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow, Rose Bailey received a sum of £19 11s 1d on 5th December 1919 which included a war gratuity of £15.

 

Private George Arthur Baker 240215

Lost at Sea 15th April 1917

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Chatby Memorial, Alexandria, Egypt

Age 22

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr George and Mrs Elizabeth Baker, Hinckley.

1911 Census: His address is given as 1 Occupation Rod, Hinckley and his occupation as a Hosiery Seamless Hand. He had 5 siblings – Doris, Walter, Grace, Sydney and Maurice.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 25th June 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 10TH NOVEMBER 1917

It is announced that Private George Baker of the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment has joined the numbers of the Fallen.

Formerly with the Hinckley Territorials, Private Baker was the son of Mr and Mrs Baker of Occupation Road, John Street, Hinckley. The deceased 22 years of age and was drowned at sea on 15th April this year.

Before enlisting Private Baker worked in the Finishing Room of W and C Wills Ltd. The deceased served in France for 13 months. He had suffered shell shock and was sent home. When he recovered he was sent to Mesopotamia. His ship, HMS Cameronia, was sunk in the Mediterranean on 15th April.

Army Register of Effects: His mother received a payment of 5s 9d on 20th May 1918. No war gratuity is recorded.

 

Private Stanley Arthur Baker 241125

Killed in Action 29th August 1918

D Company 1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Busigny Communal Cemetery Extension, France

Plot 5 Row C Grave 15/24

Age 22

Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr William and Mrs Clara Baker, 4 Clarendon Road, Hinckley

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 44 Clarendon Road, Hinckley with his parents and 5 siblings – Percy, tom, Sydney, Norah and Jim. His occupation is recorded as an apprentice in a needle factory.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 26th June 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £3 5s 11d on 10th July 1919. There is no record of a payment of a war gratuity.

 

Private Thomas Baker 205714

Died of Wounds 22nd September 1918.

5th Battalion King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry formerly 4294 Leicestershire Regiment

Terlincthun British Cemetery, Boulogne, France

Plot 6 Row C Grave 19

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs. Catherine Ellen Baker, 5 Argyle’s Yard, Stockwell Head, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his wife and 3 children at 5 Argyle’s Yard, Stockwell Head and worked as a Boot Rivetter in a Boot Factory. His children were Doris, Lily and Ivy.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 11th December 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 12TH OCTOBER 1918

Mrs. Baker of 5 Argyle’s Yard, Stockwell Head, has been notified that her husband Private Thomas Baker of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry has died in the No 53 general Hospital in France from wounds received in action on September 22nd. The deceased, in addition to being gassed, was wounded in the left arm and leg and foot and in an effort to save his life it became necessary to amputate his left leg. His body was buried in a cemetery near Boulogne. The deceased, who volunteered for service four years ago leaves a widow and four children.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £5 13s 3d on 27th February 1919 and a war gratuity of £15 10s on 9th December 1919.

 

Private Harry Bass 17692

Died of Wounds 26th October 1915

B Company 6th Battalion (Duke of Edinburgh’s) Wiltshire Regiment formerly 13348 Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry

Choques Military Cemetery, France

Age 23

Born Burbage Enlisted Birmingham Living Hinckley

Son of Mr. Thomas and Mrs. Elizabeth Bass, 22 Orchard Street, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 22 Orchard Street and was a Hosiery Warehouseman. He had 5 siblings – Stanley, May, Celia, Iris and Thomas.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. First went to France on 19th July 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES

Official news was received by his parents at Orchard Street on Monday morning that Private Harry Bass of B Company 6th Battalion Wiltshire regiment has died of wounds received in action on October 25th.

No official particulars as to how Private Bass met his death are yet to hand. According to his Hinckley comrades in the same regiment, a party of Wiltshires set out from their billets near to the firing line to clear out a rear trench. The work was accomplished successfully and return to the billets (a barn) were being made by a direct route instead of circuitous as on the outward journey, when the party was observed by a German aviator. A few minutes after he had returned to his lines the enemy commenced shelling, one of the projectiles bursting over the Wiltshires and causing a hurried journey back to the trenches. Unfortunately, Bass was caught by a portion of the shell and laid low. His absence was not noted until the party arrived back in the trenches but a search party was immediately sent out to look for him and eventually he was found lying badly wounded in the shoulder and thigh. He was carried to safety and eventually transferred to the dressing station. Apparently his Hinckley comrades at the front were unaware of his fate, for on Tuesday a letter was received from Sgt F Bedford saying from enquiries made, Private Bass was reported to be going on nicely. Private Harry Bass was 23 years of age. A finely built fellow he enlisted in the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry with a handful of Hinckley men in September of last year being afterwards transferred to the Wiltshire regiment. He went to France with his regiment at the beginning of July in the best of spirits. The deceased soldier was well known locally. Formerly, he was the Honorary Secretary of the Hinckley Swimming Club and was not only a prominent member of the Corinthians Football Club but also distinguished himself with his regimental football team. Before he enlisted he was a counterman at the hosiery factory of Messrs, Simpkin, Son Emery. His death is generally regretted in Hinckley where the greatest sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £2 4s 2d on 1st February 1916. She also received a war gratuity of £4 on 30th August 1919.

 

Private Arthur Bates 5440

Killed in Action 10th March 1915

2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Le Touret Memorial to the Missing, France

Panel 11

Age 35

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley Living Hinckley

Husband of Mrs. Marian Elizabeth Bates, 4 Lower Bond Street, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 4 Lower Bond Street and was employed as a Dyer.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 4th January 1915.

Army Register of Effects: His widow received a war gratuity of £5 on 7th October 1919.

 

 

Sergeant Arthur Beadsworth 11677

Died of Wounds 9th October 1917

7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Wimereux Communal Cemetery, Wimereux, France

Plot 6 Row C Grave 19

Age 44

Born Leicester Enlisted Leicester Living in Hinckley

Husband of Polly Beadsworth, 44 Derby Road, Hinckley.

Unitarian memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

He played football for Leicester Fosse.

1911 Census: His address is given as 15 Occupation Road, Hinckley and his occupation as Shoe Finisher. He lived with his wife Polly and three children – Leslie Arthur, Norah Mariah and Maggie.

Medal Index Card: Gives his rank as Acting Colour Sergeant. Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914- 1915 Star. The card records that he was in France from 29th July 1915.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar - November 1917

Sergt. A Beadsworth, aged 41, of the 7th Leicesters, died of gas poisoning on October 9th in France. He leaves a widow and three children who live at 44 Derby Road. His only son, Pte. Leslie Beadsworth lies wounded in Hospital in Cardiff.

ST MARCH 1917

Readers of the “Hinckley Times” will be pleased to hear that Sergeant A Beadsworth of the Leicestershire Regiment has been promoted to Quartermaster Sergeant. He joined up soon after the commencement of the war and has had thrilling experiences and some narrow escapes during his military career, which includes two years service in France. Quartermaster-Sergeant Beadsworth is well known in Hinckley both as a footballer and cricketer and was engaged as a professional cricketer both at Penrith and Appleby. At the time of receiving this news he was in good health. He was best known on the football field having played for Hinckley, Manchester United, Leicester Fosse, Burton United and Swindon.

HINCKLEY TIMES 10TH NOVEMBER 1917

Sergeant Arthur Beadsworth, the well-known Hinckley footballer and cricketer, died in a Military Hospital in France on October 9th, from gas poisoning. The deceased leaves a wife and three children, one of whom, Private Leslie Beadsworth has been in the firing line and is now lying wounded. Sergeant Beadsworth was 44 years of age.

Army Register of Effects: A war gratuity of £17 was paid to his widow on 20th November 1919.

No service record survives.

From The Foxes Alphabet by Paul Taylor and Dave Smith

His football career included:

1894 – Leicester YMCA and Hinckley Town

1900 – Leicester Fosse

1901 – Coventry City

1902 – Manchester United

1903 – Swindon Town

1905 – New Brompton

1906 – Burton United

He made four appearances for Leicester Fosse without scoring.

 

Private Ernest Beasley 25050

Killed in Action 15th September 1916

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing

Pier 2 Face C and Pier 3 Face A

Primitive Methodist Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He lived at 4 Hill Street, Hinckley with his mother Ann and 4 siblings – Rose, Lily, Charles and Florry. He was employed as a Hosiery Machine Knitter.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £2 54s 11d on 18th November 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 24th November 1919.

 

Private Bertie Thomas Beasley 57249

Killed in Action 28th September 1918

1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers

Hooge Crater Cemetery, Belgium

Lot 1 Row H Grave 17

Age 19

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr. William Beasley and Mrs Mary Beasley, Coventry Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

S. Davis and Sons Factory Memorial Scroll (now in Hinckley and District Museum; original in the Imperial War Museum)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was still at school. He had two siblings – Nellie and William G.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His father received a payment of 311 10s 10d on 18th March 1919 and a war gratuity of £3 6d on 11th December 1919.

 

Private Thomas Alfred Beasley 25391

Killed in Action 17th July 1916

4t Battalion Worcestershire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, France

Pier 5 Face A Pier 6 Face C

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Age 18

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr and Mrs I Beasley, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

St. Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: Living at 22 Brick Kiln Street, Hinckley. He was a runner on and seamless hand in a hosiery factory. He had 3 brothers and 3 sisters.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914- 915 Star. Card indicates that his first theatre of war was the Balkans 6th December 1915.

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – August 1916

The death of Private Thomas Beasley, 4th Worcesters, is also announced, but not officially. The news has been received from some of his comrades. One, in sending his sincere sympathy writes: “I regret to let you know that I was with you son on the night of his death and I can surely say that he did his duty like a soldier. His death took place on a raid we made on the enemy”. The deceased enlisted about a year ago and sailed for Egypt last November, within three days of his eighteenth birthday, later being sent to France, where he has paid the price of his patriotism. The last letter received from him was dated July 15th. John, his brother, is also serving the Crown.

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – February 1917

After having for six months posted him as missing, the War Office has informed the parents of the late Private Thomas Alfred Beasley (4th Worcesters) that it is “ regretfully constrained to conclude that he is dead” and that he died on July 17th last. It will be remembered that we announced his death in our August issue – the news having been received through a comrade. The deceased was only 17 years old when he enlisted in June 1915 and on the 24th of the following November he was despatched to Egypt. Three or four months later he was transferred to France where he fell fighting for his country – RIP.”

Army Register of effects: £2 granted on 15th March 1917 to Father, Isaac and a War Gratuity - £3 10s was paid on 28th December 1918.Notes suggested that the date of death took some time to be accepted. This suggests that he was obviously missing.

No service record survives.

 

 

 

Private George Bedford 1126

Died of Wounds 4th November 1915

D Company 1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Abbeville Communal cemetery

Plot 3 Row D Grave 1

Age 24

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr. Jesse Bedford and Mrs Martha Bedford, 66 Queens Road, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and 4 siblings – William, Samuel, Albert and Elizabeth.

He was employed as a Hosiery Trimmer.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 27th February 1915 landing at Le Harve.

Service Record: He was aged 20 when he enlisted on 21st March 1911. The record shows him serving in B Company. He was 5ft 63/4ins in height. He was sent to hospital from the field on 1st September 1915 with Bronchial Catarrh. He returned to duty on 14th September 1915. He was admitted to the 9th Casualty Clearing Station on 13th October 1915 with a gunshot wound to the head. He was moved to the 2nd Stationary Hospital at Abbeville on 14th October with a wound described as a perforated brain. He was reported as dangerously ill on the 18th and 25th October and succumbed to his wounds on 4th November 1915. The record lists another brother Charles W Bedford living in Rugby and another sister, Mary Bedford, address unknown. His effects were returned to his family - an identity disc, a pocket book, a testament, a wallet, letters, photos, postcards, an aluminium ring and false teeth. He was deprived of a Lance-Corporal stripe for misconduct on 26th September 1914. His family wrote acknowledging receipt of his effects and asked for a photograph of his grave. By the time of the armistice in November 1918 his father had moved to 34 Wood Street, Hinckley.

HINCKLEY TIMES 20TH NOVEMBER 1915

It is officially announced that Private George Bedford of the Hinckley Territorials has died of wounds received while taking part in the famous attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt on October 13th. His death took place at the Abbeville Hospital in France following a period of unconsciousness of 22 days.

Private Bedford was shot through the head in the charge and never spoke again. Twenty Four years of age, the deceased soldier was the son of Mr Jesse Bedford of Queens Road and prior to the Territorials being mobilised was employed by Messrs. A E Hawley and Co of Sketchley Dyeworks. He was well known local especially in football circles.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £15 4s 9d on 20th March 1916 and a war gratuity of £4 10s on 20th August 1919.

 

Private Arthur William Bedford 53153

Killed in Action 30th September 1918

15th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers formerly 99094 RAMC

Vis-en-Artois Memorial, France

Panels 5 and 6

Age 27

Born in Hinckley Enlisted in Hinckley Living in Hinckley

Primitive Methodist Memorial

1911 Census: Gives his address as 10 The Borough and his occupation as a Boot Clicker. His siblings were Percy, Stanley, Clarence and Gladys.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Register of Effects: A sum of £1 was paid to his widow, Ellen, on 8th February 1919 and a war gratuity of £8 was paid to the widow on 2nd December 1919.

No service record survives.

 

Private Herbert Beeby 61465

Died of Wounds 27th April 1918

12th Battalion The Manchester Regiment formerly 31150 South Lancashire Regiment

Doullen Communal Cemetery, Extension No 1, France

Plot 6 Row A Grave 58

Age 29

Born Nuneaton Enlisted Hinckley

1911 Census:  Living at 2 Gladstone Terrace, Hinckley. His wife was Edith May Beeby and he had a son – Gordon aged 3 months. There was a lodger, Annie Farmer. His occupation is given a Miner Bondsman Underground.

Army Register of Effects: A sum of £8 11s 3d was paid to his widow Edith on 3rd September 1918 and a war gratuity of £9 was paid to the widow on 1st December 1919.

 

Private Herbert James H Beeby 341328

Accidentally Killed 3rd July 1919

3rd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

Hinckley Cemetery

Section 3 Grave 208

Age 22

Son of Mrs Elizabeth Beeby, 5 Chandler’s Yard, Stockwell Head, Hinckley.

1911 Census: Scholar, living at 1 Clark’s Yard, Hinckley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British Medal

HINCKLEY TIMES

The late Private Herbert Beeby son of Mrs Beeby of Chandler’s Yard, Castle Street, Hinckley, was mysteriously shot in the dark at Didcot military depot. His body was buried with military honours at Hinckley, last Wednesday.

Army Register of Effects: A sum of £15 17s 11d was paid to his mother on 34rd December 1919. The sum included a war gratuity of £13.

No service record survives.

 

 

Private William Beeby 240142

Died of Wounds 30th April 1917

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Noeux-les-Mines Communal Cemetery, Bethune, France

Plot 1 Row Q Grave 11

Age 22

Born Nuneaton Enlisted Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Son of Mrs Elizabeth Beeby, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 1 Clark’s Yard, Hinckley. He was employed as a shoe hand and lived with his parents along with three brothers – Edward Richard Beeby, Herbert Beeby and Henry Beeby and one sister Ellen R Beeby.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star.

HINCKLEY TIMES 12th MAY 1917

Mr and Mrs Beeby of 5 Chandler’s Yard, Stockwell Head, Hinckley, have been notified that their son Private William Beeby of the Hinckley Territorials died at a Casualty Clearing Station in France on April 30th, following wounds received in action two days previously.

Second-Lieutenant J C Brooks writing to the bereaved mother says: “Your son was on duty in the trenches when a piece of shell hit him in the head. He lived for some hours after but I am pleased to say that he was unconscious and suffered no pain. I am afraid that this will come as a terrible shock to you as it has to all of us. The only consolation I can give you is by telling you what a fine fellow he was. He was always cheerful and never grumbled at any job he was given to do. He was of great assistance to me when we had any special work to do. He worked hard himself and always cheered up the rest of the platoon.

The late Private Beeby, who was 22 years of age, went out with the Territorials soon after the outbreak of the war, having since been in the thick of the fighting. Before the war he was employed at the boot factory of Messrs. Harvey and Harvey, Barwell.

Army Register of Effects: A sum of £11 3s 4d was paid to his mother on 5th July 1917. A war gratuity of £12 10s was paid to his mother on 15th November 1919.

No service record survives

 

 

 

Private Bertie Bircumshaw 25774

Died of Wounds 3rd October 1917

9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinge, Belgium

Plot 25 Row A Grave 14

Born Radford, Notts Enlisted Coalville Living Hinckley

Husband of Mrs Ethel Bircumshaw, 32 Trinity Lane, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Memorial, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 12 Albert Road, Hinckley with his brother Harry and his mother Heleanor. He was employed as a Hosiery Warehouseman.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 3RD NOVEMBER 1917

Private Bircumshaw was badly wounded fighting in the very frontline of the battle. He was known as a credit to his regiment. He was carried to the Regimental Aid Post but the wound which had penetrated the lung, was severe and death took place at the dressing station.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother and wife received payments of £1 3s 2d on 17th December 1917 and 3s 4d on 7th February 1918. They both received a share of his war gratuity - £3 10s each on 4th December 1919.

Letter from D M Sawburn CF, Church of England Chaplain, 17th Casualty Clearing Station, October 3rd 1917

“Dear Mrs Bircumshaw,

I deeply regret to say that your husband Private B Bircumshaw 25774 died her at 6.50am October 3rd of wounds in the back perforating the chest. He was only with us for a few minutes and could not speak and did not suffer owing to numbness and shock. His effects will be sent to you. His body lies in Lyssenthoek Military Cemetery (Plot 25 Row A Grave 14), 2 miles south west of Poperinge. God Bless you and sustain you in this great sorrow. PS He left a will leaving his effects equally between you and his mother.”

A fragmentary letter home from Bertie Bircumshaw exists

“Wednesday 28th March 1917 - Dear Ma, Ev and Harry, I am writing to tell you that I am quite alright and will hoping this finds you all the same at home. I don’t know when I shall be able to post it as we are on the move but well I thought I would write and post it the first chance I got. Very pleased to say I got your letter that you wrote but…………………..you are all well and so comfortable and happy together and I thank you for the cigarettes as I was just about out of them and I could not get any as we were in the trenches but I am pleased to tell you that we are out again at last so that we are alright. I have received all that you have sent me up to now EV and thank you very much for all you sent to me. It is grand to be away from the trenches and we have all had a great clean up all around this morning and we are just off for a bath this afternoon so you see we all feel in a great humour after being amongst so much mud and water. As I sit out in the open writing this the sun is shining lovely and it is getting warmer every day and I hope that you are having better weather at home but I think we have got over the worst now so that is a good job. Glad to hear that Evelyn’s throat is better also that they are all well at home. Pleased to say that we only had one casualty in the last 5 days in the line and that was only a slight wound that our Sergeant received. Good to hear about………………”

 

Private Harry Bircumshaw 240989

Discharged 9th March 1917

Leicestershire Regiment (probably 1/5th Battalion)

Civilian Death 13th October 1919

Buried in Hinckley Cemetery.

Age 36

Brother of the above.

Son of Mrs. Heleanor Bircumshaw, 12 Albert Road, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Memorial, Hinckley.

St. Paul’s Church Memorial, in St. Mary’s Church, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was single and living with his brother Bertie and his Mother Heleanor at 12 Albert Road, Hinckley. He was employed as a Hosiery Warehouseman.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 28th February 1915.

 

Private Charles Bennett 46247

Killed in Action 2nd March 1918

2/6th Battalion The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment)

Queant Road Cemetery, Buissy, France

Plot 3 Row D Grave 30

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 5 Blue Boar Yard, Hinckley with his parents Mr. Thomas Bennett and Mrs. Betsy Bennett. His occupation was recorded as Hosiery Dyer. He had six siblings – Thomas, Albert, Annie, Ernest, Doris and Ivy.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £16 13s 5d on 28th December 1919 which included a war gratuity of £12.

 

First Class Petty Officer John A Blockley

Drowned 13th January 1915

HMS Viknor

Bangor Cemetery, Northern Ireland

Plot 6P Grave 95

Age 45

St Peter’s Church Memorial

His name was originally missed off Hinckley War Memorial but was added in November 2005.

Native of Hinckley

Son of Z Blockley

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine February 1915

The tragedy of war has been brought home to us by the sad news of the death of First –Class Petty Officer John Alfred Blockley, who was found drowned in Belfast Lough, off the north coast of Ireland, on Monday January 25th last, after having been, according to medical opinion, in the water for about a week. Mr Blockley was a native of Hinckley and in his boyhood frequently served the Mass of Father Sablon. It is now some thirty years since he left the town and went to live in Portsmouth. He was called up at the beginning of the war and stationed on the boom defence at this famous naval port. Later he was drafted to the ill-fated HMS Viknor, an armed merchantman. At the outbreak of the war this ship was on a pleasure cruise to Norway but had to abandon the trip and come back to the Tyne. She was commissioned at Portsmouth, just before Christmas and left for Canada with twenty-one officers on board. After being missing for some days, the first intimation of her foundering (whether by a mine or through the recent bad weather is not known) and the loss of all officers and men was conveyed by the discovery of Mr. Blockley’s body. When picked up he had a lifebelt and an inflated rubber collar on. His remains were interred with full naval and military honours in Bangor New Cemetery on Thursday, the 28th, a band of pipers playing funeral music and the Rev H Boyle, PP, conducting the service. RIP.

 

Lance-Corporal Arthur Blower 17695

Killed in Action 21st January 1916

B Company 6th Battalion Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment) formerly 13347 Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry

Rue de Berceaux Military Cemetery, Richebourg L’Avoue, France

Plot 1 Row E Grave 21

Age 27

Born Hinckley Enlisted Birmingham Living Hinckley

Son of Mrs E Blower, 35 Manor Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living at 35 Manor Street with his parents, Mr William and Mrs Ellen Blower and was employed as a Hosiery Hand Shirt hand. He had 4 siblings – Lilla, Ellen, Walter and William.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 19th July 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 29TH JANUARY 1916

A letter received in Hinckley on Tuesday morning contained the sad intelligence that Lance-Corporal Scout Arthur Blower of the B Company 6th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment, the fourth son of Mr and Mrs William Blower of 35 Manor Street, Hinckley was shot in the head by a bullet while out on patrol last Friday and was killed instantly. Blower was one of the 8 Hinckley “Pals” who enlisted shortly after the outbreak of the war. Death has now reduced this number to 6, Private Harry Bass succumbing to death some three months go. The party enlisted in the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry but were later drafted into the 6th Wiltshires. They went out to the front last summer. The deceased came from an athletic family. He himself was a fine swimmer and as a footballer rendered yeoman service in connection with the Corinthians club. The deceased soldier was for some years a member of Hinckley Liberal Club and at the outbreak of the war was employed as a machinist at the hosiery factory of Messrs Simpkin Son Emery.

Suspicions as to the deceased’s fate were aroused last weekend when his family received from an unknown sender the deceased’s wallet, pocket watches and buttons from his tunic. A subsequent post brought news from Sergeant Frank Bedford of Hinckley, one of the “Pals” that Blower had been killed. Bedford further stated that Blower was thirty yards from his parapet when he was shot. He was soon brought into the trenches but it was too late for assistance. He was buried in a cemetery outside R……Frank Bedford and Harry Bott being at the funeral. The deceased’s family heard of the bereavement in a painfully unexpected manner. Mr. Bedford met Blower’s father in Castle Street shortly after the former had received the letter containing the sad news and asked him whether Frank had mentioned anything about “Arthur Blower” in the letters. Unaware that he was speaking to Blower’s father, Mr. Bedford told him that he had just had a letter to say that the soldier mentioned had been killed. The father turned off home on the point of collapse without uttering a word. A younger brother of the soldier is shortly expecting to be ordered abroad.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £4 10s 10d on 27th March 1916 and a war gratuity of £5 10s on 10th October 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal Walter Sydney Blower 240883

Killed in Action 28th September 1917

2/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Panel 50 to 51

Enlisted Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: Brother of the above. He lived at 35 Manor Street, Hinckley with his parents Mr William and Mrs Ellen Blower and 4 siblings – Lilla, Arthur, Ellen and William. He was employed as a carpenter.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Register of Effects: His mother received a payment of £11 1s 6d on 27th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £14 on 1st December 1919.

 

Private Arthur Blower 3351

Died of Wounds 9th October 1917

6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Godewaersvelde British Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row F Grave 47

Age 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs. Violet Harriet Blower, 34 Coventry Rod, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 20 Mill Hill Road, Hinckley and his occupation was recorded as Hosiery Trimmer. He lived with his parents Mr Charles and Mrs Elizabeth Blower and two siblings –Elizabeth and Kate.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He enlisted on 10th December 1915 and was living at 70 Upper Bond Street, Hinckley. He was aged 26 and declared previous service in the Territorials. His wife was Violet Blower, nee Hewer and had married on 2nd August 1914. By December 1919 Mrs Blower had moved to 269 Stoney Stanton Road, Coventry. He first went to France on 3rd December 1917.

HINCKLEY TIMES 27TH OCTOBER 1917

Mrs. Blower of 34 Coventry Road, Hinckley, has been notified that her husband, Private Arthur Blower of the Leicesters died in the 37th Casualty Clearing Station in France in October from injuries received in action a few days previously. He had sustained injuries to his hand, leg and had a fractured femur.

The late Private Blower, who was 29 years of age, had for 14 years prior to enlisting worked in the trimshop of Sketchley Dyeworks. He was a close friend of the late Private Fairbrother, who on returning from his leave a few weeks ago, delivered a message from his wife shortly before his death.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £3 6s 5d on 7th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £3 on 11th December 1919.

 

Gunner Fred Blower 99732

Died of Wounds 29th April 1918

Royal Garrison Artillery

Arneke British Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row E Grave 14

Age 36

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs. Ethel A Blower, Mount Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

S Davis and Sons Factory Memorial Scroll (now in Hinckley and District Museum; original in the Imperial War Museum)

1911 Census: he was single and lived with his parents Mr Charles and Mrs. Eliza Blower at 26 Manor Street, Hinckley. He had one sibling – Ada. His occupation is recorded as a Hosiery Warehouseman.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal

Service Record: He enlisted on 10th December 1915 and was living at 20 Manor Street, Hinckley. His height is recorded as 5ft 71/2 inches. He first went to France on 10th February 1917. He was posted to 148 Siege Battery. He joined 191 Siege Battery on 11th January 1918. He had leave to the UK from 26th February 1918 to 12th March 1918. He died of wounds at the 10th Casualty Clearing Station. His widow received a pension of 13s 9d per week from 11th November 1918.

HINCKLEY TIMES 18TH MAY 1918

Gunner Fred Blower aged 35 years of age with the Royal Garrison Artillery has died at a casualty Clearing Station from wounds received in action on April 24th 1918. He was married in 1916 to the only daughter of Mr. S Randle of Trinity Lane. He had been in the army for 2 years. Testimony to his worth is supplied by Lieutenant E.C.S. Wale who in a letter to his widow states: “your husband has been serving in the section for six months and will be greatly missed by his fellow signallers”. Gunner Blower was employed as a foreman at Messrs. S Davis and Sons for over 20 years. For many years he was an active and loyal supporter of Hinckley Rugby Football Club and also a member of Hinckley Liberal Club, where he was a highly respected member.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £6 2s 6d on 30th July 1918 and a war gratuity of £8 10s on 3rd December 1919.

 

 

Private George Blower 20372

Killed in Action 22nd March 1918

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Bay 5

Born Wednesbury, Staffs Enlisted Leicester

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 5 Spinney Hill Road, Leicester with his wife Ellen and daughter Phyllis. He was employed as a railway clerk.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES DECEMBER 1918

Former Hinckley clerk’s death in captivity – Mrs Blower of 23 Bushby Road, Leicester has received official information that her husband, 203732 Pte. G Blower, 1st Leicester, died a prisoner of war on March 234rd 1918. He had previously been reported as missing. The deceased was for 11 years a clerk at Hinckley Railway station, afterwards being transferred to Leicester. He was 38 years of age. Mrs. Blower is a daughter of Mr. Willoughby Farmer of Queens Road, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £12 10s 10d which included a war gratuity of £5 on 6th May 1919.

 

Private William Bloxham 40217

Killed in Action 25th September 1916

8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Thiepval memorial to the Missing, France

Pier 2 Face C Pier 3 Face A

Age 39

Born Hinckley Enlisted Loughborough Living Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

1911 Census: He was living with his parents Mr Joseph and Mrs Eliza Ann Bloxham and he was single. He was employed as a building labourer and had 5 siblings – Joseph, Eliza Ann, Maria, Marshall and Florrie

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal

HINCKLEY TIMES 28TH OCTOBER 1916

Private William Bloxham of the Leicesters was killed in action in September in France. He enlisted at the age of 38 years in June 1915 and went to France in August of 1916. He lived at 24 Manor Street, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of 7/9d on 13th March 1917 and a war gratuity of £5 10s on 24th October 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal James Bolesworth 7521

Killed in Action 15th September 1916

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Guillemont Road Cemetery, France

Plot 6 Row D Grave 4

Age 30

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley Living in Hinckley

Husband of Sarah Bolesworth, Hanley, Stoke on Tent

Primitive Methodist Memorial, Hinckley

St. Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census – Living at 1 Druid Street, Hinckley, with his parents, he is given as single. His occupation is stated to be a framework knitter.

Medal Index Card – Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-15 Star. Card gives disembarkation date in France as 9th September 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES 14th OCTOBER 1916

Mrs Bolesworth of 48 Stockwell Head on Wednesday received official notice that one of her sons, Lance-Corporal James Bolesworth of the Leicesters was killed in action during the fighting on September 15th. The deceased was called up as a reservist on the outbreak of the war, having joined the Leicesters 12years ago. He left for France on September 17th 1914. He was the brother of Lance-Corporal Togo Bolesworth, DCM and Croix de Guerre, who was wounded in the earlier fighting and is now back in France. At one stage of the war Mrs Bolesworth had for sons in the firing line. Two have now been killed in action and a third has been wounded and discharged from the army. Mrs Bolesworth has a number of grandsons in the trenches.

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – October 1916

The late Lance-Corporal James Bolesworth was a reservist and was called up when war broke out. He had been out in France two years last month and had he lived he would have been thirty one years old in the present month. No official intimation of his death had been received up to going to press but the sad news was sent by his brother Sydney, who gives the date as September 15th last. To his widow we offer every sympathy. Private Walter Bolesworth (brother in law) of the above has been discharged owing to ill health.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £11 7s 1d was paid to his widow Sarah on 22nd January 1917. A war gratuity of £12 was paid to his widow on 22nd December 1919.

 

 

Private Sydney “Togo” Bolesworth 7832

Distinguished Conduct Medal       Croix de Guerre

Killed in Action 1st October 1917

9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium

Panels 50 to 51

Age 29

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Son of Mrs Bolesworth, Spring Gardens, Hinckley

Primitive Methodist Memorial, Hinckley

St Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Gives rank as Lance-Corporal and then Acting Corporal. It also sates disembarkation date in France as 20th September 1914. Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 -1915 Star.

Service Record:  Prior to enlistment he  worked as a miner. He enlisted on 12th December 1905 in the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment with the regimental number 7832.He was aged 19 years and 11 months. At a medical examination on 13th December 1905 he stood 5ft 7ins high and weighed 10 stones 8 and a half pounds.

From 12th December 1905 to 24th March 1906 he served at Leicester and transferred to B Company 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. From 30th Mach 1906 to 20th September 1906 he served at Colchester. From 21st September 1906 to 10th January 1913 he served in India. He embarked on the SS Dongola on 21st September and arrived in India on 11th October 1906.

He served in Belgaum from 13th October 1906 until 11t February 1911 when he transferred to Madras where he served until 16th April 1912. There is then service at a place unspecified until he returns to England on 11th January 1913. He agrees to serve with the Reserve on his return. Whilst in India there are several bouts of illness, including one of enteric fever and three of malaria, for which he receives hospital based care.

He was mobilised at Leicester on 5th August 1914 into the 3rd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment as a paid Lance-Corporal and from 8th September 1914 in the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. From 20th September 1914 to 21st August 1915 he served with the Battalion in France. He appears at some stage to have lost his rank for he is again made an unpaid Lance-Corporal and then a paid Lance Corporal on 9th June 1915. He loses the pay when he is admitted to the 18th General Hospital on 18th August 1915, with a gunshot wound to the thigh. He remains at home from 22nd August 1915 to 12th April 1916.

On 22nd August 1915 he is posted the Depot, Leicestershire Regiment and quickly loses his stripe for misconduct, unspecified. On 25th September 1915 he is posted to the 3rd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment and on 28th September he is posted back to the Depot, Leicestershire Regiment. Between 9th October 1915 and 20th October 1915 he forfeits pay for 12 days absence. On the 9th November 1915 he is posted to the 3rd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. On 7th February 1916 he is again made an unpaid Lance-Corporal. He is then posted back to the 1s Battalion Leicestershire Regiment in France via Southampton.

He does a month’s service in an unknown unit and returns on 13th May 1916 to the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. Sometime between May and December 1916 he is given 14 days Field Punishment Number 1 for misconduct. Then on 15th December 1916 he reports sick with myalgia and is admitted to the 17th Field Ambulance. He returns to his unit on 22nd December 1916.

The poor disciplinary record continues when on 18th March 1917 he is tried by Field General Court Martial and is sentenced to 2 months Field Punishment Number 1. His crime is drunkenness on 8th March in the front line trenches, when on orderly duty, he was found drunk. The sentence was confirmed by the General Officer commanding the 7th Infantry Division. Togo had been awaiting trial since 11th March.

On 13th April 1917, he is wounded in action with a gunshot wound to the buttock. He was evacuated to the 18th Field Ambulance and then No1 Casualty Clearing Station. He is then sent to the military hospital in Canterbury. He spends 28 days in hospital and is posted to the 3rd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. Sometime in the next few days he forfeits pay for absence.

On 10th June 1917 he returns via Folkestone to France. Initially he is posted to the 8th  Battalion Leicestershire Regiment and then on the 1st September 1917 to his final posting with the 9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment only a month away from his death.

 

BROTHERS LIVING IN1919

Thomas Bolesworth  47  1 Druid Street, Hinckley

John Bolesworth  36        Duke Street, Nuneaton

Walter Bolesworth  23     Barwell

 

SISTERS LIVING IN 1919

Mary Bray  46                     Mansion Street, Hinckley

Harriet Fairfax  44              Dares Walk, Hinckley

Elizabeth?  41                     Middow Street,  Nuneaton

Florence Knight  39            Dares Walk, Hinckley

Rachel Ann Stirling  28      Queens Road, Nuneaton

 

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – November 1917

It is with feelings of sincere regret that we chronicle the death of Private Sydney Bolesworth of the 9th Leicesters which occurred on October 1st last, whilst in action in France. Writing on the 16th, Lieutenant R W Griffiths sends to Mrs Bolesworth the following eulogistic tribute to her son:” He was one of my snipers and I feel his death as a personal loss. He was a real soldier – a man of whom I was proud. I had asked him once or twice to take a stripe but he had always refused; but even as a Private soldier he was one whom I could always place in command of other men. All of us – not only in the sniping section but in the battalion – liked and respected him. Many of the officers used to speak of him as the “best soldier in the regiment”. As a boxer he was of course second to none of us; but he was also a real good fellow; and I am proud to think that he looked on me as a pal as well as an officer…..I will send you fuller particulars as soon as I can get them. By all accounts your son fought like a lion and died a real hero’s death. I know that you will be proud of him”.

Private Bolesworth, who was 29 years of age, joined the army about twelve years ago and it was as a reservist at he was called up at the beginning of the war. He had been twice wounded, the first time being in 1915, when he was in charge of a picket at Hooge. Wounded by a shell in one of his legs and severely bruised by falling timber, he stuck to his post until relieved, collapsing after reporting to his Company Commander. For this he was awarded the DCM. He was wounded again last March. He went out to France for the third time in the following June. Besides the above mentioned award he had received the French Croix de Guerre in recognition of his distinguished services.

Prior to the war the deceased soldier had the reputation of being one of the best boxers in the Midlands and on many occasions had met and defeated the champions of Leicester and Birmingham. Whilst in India he held a great record, defeating Bandsman Blake. As army champion he carried of cups at Madras (1908) and Poona.

He is the third brother to fall on the field. Corporal William Bolesworth was killed at Mons on March 11th, 1916; and Lance Corporal James Bolesworth met his death on the Somme on the 15th of the following September – RIP.

The fourth brother (Walter) fought in France and Mesopotamia and being severely wounded in the latter country, was invalided home and discharged about a year ago.

 

HINCKLEY TIMES JANUARY 1918

It is announced that Private Sydney Bolesworth has been killed in action at 9.00am on 1st October 1917, aged 28 years. Private Bolesworth was serving with the Leicestershire Regiment. Private Bolesworth was known as “Togo” and joined the Leicesters as a lad and served seven years with the Tigers in India, refusing promotion several times. Whilst in India his boxing attributes flourished. He won the Middleweight 11 stones 14 pounds) Championship of India and the 10 stone 4 pounds Championship in 1908. He thrice beat Bandsman Blake and established for himself a preeminent position in Army boxing. Bandsman Blake was a well-known boxer of that time and was reckoned to be one of the “white hopes” to take the title of Negro Jack Johnson.

Togo was called up as a reservist at the outbreak of war and was in France engaged in the dangerous work of sniping. In February 1916 the President of France awarded him the Croix de Guerre and about the same time he received the Distinguished Conduct Medal for “whilst in charge of a picket and wounded in both legs by a shell, he stuck to his post until relieved and only collapsed after reporting to his commanding officer”.

Lieutenant Griffiths, his officer said that Private Bolesworth even though not an NCO was one he could put in command of other men. He was well liked and respected by not only all in the sniping section but in the Battalion and many officers though he “was the best soldier in the regiment”.

Between periods of service, Togo boxed regularly around the local Midland shows and had quite a following. He was the son of Mrs. Bolesworth of Spring Gardens, Hinckley, who has now lost three sons in the war and has a fourth son wounded.

 

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL CITATION

Whilst serving with the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment…….

“For conspicuous gallantry. He was in charge of a picket and was wounded by a shell in both legs and severely bruised by falling timber. He stuck to his post until relieved, collapsing after he had reported to his commanding officer”

 

HINCKLEY TIMES 14TH NOVEMBER 1952

An article appeared in this edition in relation to Togo Bolesworth. It outlined his career including the fact that whilst he was serving at home he was tried at York Assizes for the manslaughter of a fellow soldier.  He was acquitted, after his officers had described him as the best soldier in the regiment and had also paid for his legal defence. The article also contains an eyewitness account of how Togo was killed in action. A Joseph Paul told the paper that on 30th September he and Togo went over the parapet, forward of the British trenches. They found a suitable shell hole, some fifty yards from the enemy line and set up a sniping position for themselves. The article continued: “The two men had sniper’s rifles and in the course of the early morning they had a shot or two because things seemed unduly lively over in the German lines. It was shortly before 9.00aam that the trench in front of them began to spill enemy soldiers into the broken ground ahead. They used a few more rounds. Then a German bullet hit Togo ad Joe got his in the leg. Somehow, Joe got back but Togo still lay out there in his muddy Flanders shell hole.  Togo Bolesworth, the best Middleweight Hinckley ever produced had taken the last count”.

Army Register of Effects: A sum of £20 was paid on 27th April 1921 to his brothers and sisters to be divided between them.

 

 

 

Corporal William Bolesworth 10061

Died of Wounds 13th May 1915

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension,, France

Plot 1 Row A Grave 12

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living in Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Primitive Methodist Memorial, Hinckley

St. Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star. He first went to France on 9th November 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES

News has been received by his wife and mother at Hinckley of the death from wounds received in action of Corporal William Bolesworth of 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, a Hinckley ma, who until shortly before the war was working at the power station in Hinckley of the Leicestershire and Warwickshire Power Company.

Corporal Bolesworth had previously been attached to the army and as a reservist he was in the last week of his last year when war was declared. He had been in France since October last and gallantly fought in many engagements. He was a fine powerfully built fellow and was deservedly popular among his fellow Tigers. According to information received, Corporal Bolesworth suffered 8 wounds to the head and died some days later. He was laid to rest near a little village in France, his nephew, Private George Fairfax, assisting at the burial. The deceased leaves a widow and two lads. His younger boy enlisted some months ago.

The Bolesworth family have a remarkable fighting record. Three brothers, including Togo, the well-known boxer, have been fighting together at the front and another Walter is expecting to be sent to France at any day. All are of a magnificent physique and possess sterling fighting qualities. The mother, Mrs. Bolesworth of Druid Street, has also five grandsons and a soon-in-law with the colours.

 

SONS                           Corporal William Bolesworth   Leics. Regiment

                                    Private Sydney Bolesworth, Leics. Regiment

                                    Private James Bolesworth, Leics. Regiment

                                    Private Walter Bolesworth, Leics. Regiment

 

GRANDSONS             Private George Fairfax Leics. Regiment

                                    Private Tom Bolesworth, Leics. Regiment

                                    Private William Bolesworth, Leics. Regiment

                                    Private Sidney Bolesworth, Leics. Regiment

                                    Private W Bolesworth, Leics. Regiment

 

SON IN LAW              Private H Hackett, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Army Register of Effects: A sum of £7 16s was paid to his widow, Enid, on 23rd September 1918. A war gratuity of £6 was paid to Mrs. Enid Richardson on 15th September 1919.

 

 

Private William George Henry Bolland 40158

Killed in Action 6th December 1916

8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Vermelles British Cemetery, France

Age 19

Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr. William G H and Mrs Ellen Bolland, Wood Street, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents, Mr William George Henry Bolland and Mrs Ellen Bolland at 5 Wood Street, Hinckley. He was employed as a Hosiery Factory Lad and had 3 siblings – Charles, Cyril and Clare.

HINCKLEY TIMES 23RD DECEMBER 1916

Private William Bolland of the Leicesters has been killed in France. He is the son of Mr and Mrs Bolland, Wood Street, Hinckley. He was 19 years of age and enlisted on the outbreak of war. He trained at Luton and then went out to France. He had been wounded three times previously, once very seriously and had been treated at English hospitals. He was killed in the trenches on 6th December 1916. He worked for Messrs Moore Eady Murcott Goode.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £3 4s 11d on 20th March 1917 and a war gratuity of £9 on 7th November 1919.

 

 

 

Lance-Corporal Humphrey Bonner 36670

Died 1st January 1918

Depot Leicestershire Regiment attached 53rd Training Reserve Battalion Durham Light Infantry

Section 3 Grave 196

Age 20

Enlisted in Hinckley

Son of Robert Bonner, 4 Rugby Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: Age 13, living at 4 Rugby Road and employed as a general Carter.

Service Record

He enlisted on 12th December 1915. He lived at 4 Rugby Road and was aged 18 years and 108 days. He was a coal carter and lived with his mother Ellen Bonner.

LEICESTER DAILY MERCURY JANUARY 1918

Lance-Corporal Humphrey Bonner has died in the 1st Eastern General Hospital at Cambridge. He lived at 4 Rugby Road, Hinckley. He was aged 20.

Army Register of Effects: A sum of £8 18s 2d was paid to his father on 14th May 1918 and a war gratuity of £3 was paid to the father on 21st November 1919.

 

Private William Henry Bonser 35244

Killed in Action 7th October 1916

7th Battalion King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry formerly 4779 Leicestershire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, France

Pier 11 Face C Pier 12 Face A

Age 38

Enlisted Leicester

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 23RD DECEMBER 1916

Private William Bonser of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry was killed in France on October 7th 1916 aged 38 years of age. He had been at the front six weeks. His home was at 5 Barwell Lane, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His half-sister Sarah Smith received a payment of £2 19s 6d on 12th April 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 7th October 1919.

 

Rifleman Frank Bonnett 42893

Killed in Action 24th August 1918

12th Battalion County of London Regiment attached Kings Royal Rifle Corps, formerly Royal Flying Corps

Vis –en-Artois Memorial to the Missing, France

Panel 9

Born Leicester Enlisted Hinckley

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 8 Manor Street, Hinckley and was employed as a house painter. He lived with his wife Clara and three children – Frank, Arthur and Beatrice.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £8 7s 5d on 19th May 1919 which included a war gratuity of £6 10s. The entry says he died shortly after action of wounds.

 

Private Horace Bonnett 27885

Killed in Action 10th April 1918

6th Battalion The Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment) formerly 32362 Leicestershire Regiment; 27854 Royal Lancashire Regiment; 353551 Labour Corps and 31080 Dorsetshire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Born Leicester

Enlisted Hinckley Living Hinckley

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery.

1911 Census: He was living at 54 Trinity Lane, Hinckley with his wife Charlotte and two children - Amy and Olive. He was employed as an insurance agent.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

HINCKLEY TIMES 21ST JUNE 1918

Will any soldier in France knowing of the whereabouts of Private Horace Bonnett (27885) of the Wiltshire Regiment of Hinckley, missing since 25th March, be good enough to rite to his wife at 54 Trinity Lane, Hinckley. Private Bonnett was formerly an insurance agent at Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow Mrs Charlotte Bonnett received a payment of £9 on 25th August 1919

 

Sergeant Harry Bott 17694

MILITARY MEDAL

Killed in Action 7th August 1918

2nd Battalion The Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment) formerly 13110 Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry

Le Vertannoy British Cemetery, France

Row D Grave 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Birmingham Living Leicester

Wesleyan Methodist Memorial, Hinckley

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 19th July 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 24TH AUGUST 1918

We very much regret to learn that Sergeant Harry Bott, Military Medallist, one of a number of Hinckley lads who joined the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry at the outbreak of the war, has been killed in action. He had a brilliant army career and his demise after much gallant and loyal service will occasion much regret amongst the townspeople.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow Mrs Alice Bott received a payment of £34 2s 6d on 8th January 1919 and a war gratuity of £22 on 8th December 1919.

 

 

Trooper Percy Edgar Bowen 1774

Died of wounds 13th May 1915

Leicestershire Yeomanry

Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Panel 5

Age 24

Born in Hinckley and enlisted in Hinckley, Living in Hinckley

Brother of Mr E Bowen, 8 Alma Road, Hinckley

St Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: His occupation is given as a servant working as an ostler at the George Inn, Market Place, Hinckley.

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – June 1916

Having been missing since May 13th 1915, when he took part in memorable engagement near Ypres on that day, Trooper Percy Edgar Bowen, of the Leicestershire Yeomanry, is now presumed dead by the War Office. Deceased who was only 24 years old joined the Yeomanry five years go. He was called up when war broke out and proceeded to France in the following November. His mother’s anniversary falls on the 4th of this month – RIP.

HINCKLEY TIMES 20TH MAY 1916

After being missing since the memorable engagement near Ypres on May 13th last year, Private Percy Edgar Bowen of the Leicestershire Yeomanry is now presumed dead by the War Office.

A letter to this effect was recently received by his brother, Mr. E J Bowen of 8 Alma Road, Hinckley. He deceased was 24 years of age and was very well known in the neighbourhood. He joined he Leicestershire Yeomanry in 1911 and was called up on the outbreak of war, proceeding to France the following November. The late trooper Bowen for some time worked with Mr. E J McCartney at Hinckley but when called up was employed at Meriden, Warks.

Army Register of Effects: Sums of £3 6s 7d and £3 6s 6d were paid to his brother Ernest and Sister Gertrude Smith respectively on 7th June 1916. A war gratuity of £3 was paid to his brother Ernest on 2nd October 1919.

 

Private Bertrand Brocklehurst 27317

Killed in Action 27th April 1917

7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

St. Leger British Cemetery, France

Row C Grave 34

Age 28 Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester

Son of Thomas and Ellen Brocklehurst, Leicester. Native of Hinckley.

His name was originally missed off the Memorial but was added in November 2005.

1911 Census: He was living at 46 Glossop Street, Leicester and was occupied as a Clerk. He had four siblings – Stanley, Reginald, Dorothy and Constance.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £1 19s 9d on 19th July 1917. She received a war gratuity of £3 10s on 11th November 1919.

Private Wilfred Louis Bromley 10914

Died of Wounds 23rd October 1917

C Company 14th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Hinckley Cemetery

Section 12 Grave 79

Age 20

Born Hinckley Enlisted Nuneaton Living in Hinckley

Son of Joseph and Mary Winifred Bromley, 11 Priory Row, Hinckley.

St Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

He was a member of 2nd Hinckley St Peter’s Scout group, as seen in the middle of the top row of the photograph.

1911 Census: His address is given as 11 Priory Row and his occupation as a seamless runner on.. He had 4 siblings – Margaret, Ethel, Frank and Winnefred

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British Medal and 1914-1915 Star. The card indicates that he went to France on 6th July 1915.

Service Record

He enlisted in 1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment on 26th September 1913 and was discharged as medically unfit on 3rd October 1914.He stood 5ft 4ins tall.

At enlistment he worked as a seamless hand at Atkins and Co, Hinckley.

Served in France from 6th July 1915

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – November 1917

By the sad death of Private Wilfred Louis Bromley, at the early age of twenty, we lose another of our young men. He was grievously wounded on September 14th in the chest and spine during the recent heavy fighting an aft being in the First Canadian Hospital for a time, where t Last Sacraments were administered to him by the Chaplain, Father B J Murdoch, he arrived in London on Sunday, October 14th and was taken to King George’s Hospital. From the first his case was seen to be hopeless and after lingering for about nine days he died suddenly at 8 o’clock on the evening of the 23rd. His relatives had the consolation of visiting him during his illness and one of his sisters was with him two hours before he died. The funeral took place at Hinckley the following Saturday, in the presence of many Catholics and non-Catholics. Father Joseph officiated and full military honours were rendered by a firing party of the Leicesters from Wigston Barracks.

Private Bromley formerly belonged to the Hinckley Territorials and shortly after the outbreak of hostilities in 1914 he went with them to Luton. In October of the same year he was discharged as medically unfit. This did not, however, daunt him from joining the army again; but, knowing the futility of trying to enlist in Hinckley, he went down to Nuneaton and was successful in passing into the Royal Warwicks, being in the 14th Battalion at the time of his death. Although only seventeen and a half years of age he, in the following March (1915) went to France but he was back in Hinckley about Christmastime, suffering from “trench feet”. Twelve months later he was at home again with shrapnel wounds in both is arm. Then after a few weeks of convalescence, at the Isle of Wight, he returned for a final time to France, last January. At one time he was member of St. Peter’ Scouts. To his relatives and those of Private Sydney Bolesworth we offer our cordial sympathy – RIP.

HINCKLEY TIMES 3RD NOVEMEBR 1917

On Saturday afternoon last the mortal remains of Private Wilfred Louis Bromley, the eldest son of Mr Joseph Bromley of 11 Priory Row, Hinckley were laid to rest in the cemetery, Ashby Road, with full military honours, a firing party of the Leicesters attending from Wigston Barracks. The Rev. Joseph Mandy OP, of St. Peter’s officiated.

The deceased soldier, who was in his 21st year, went with the Hinckley Territorials to Luton, shortly after hostilities were declared in 1914, but in October of the same year was discharged as medically unfit. However, he went to Nuneaton shortly after and enlisted in the Royal Warwick, in which he remained until his death. He passed over to France in March 1915 but was back in Hinckley the following December, suffering from “trench feet”. He was at home again 12 months later, this time wounded by shrapnel in both arms. After about a month convalescing at the Isle of Wight, he returned to France, finally last January.

During recent heavy fighting, on September 14th, he was grievously wounded in the chest and spine and whilst in the 1st Canadian General Hospital, he received the last sacraments from Rev. B I Murdoch.

He was brought over to King George’ Hospital, London on Sunday 14th October but his case as hopeless and he died nine days later, passing away on Tuesday night, the 23rd. On the following Friday his body was brought to Hinckley. Before the war, Private Bromley was in the employ of Messrs. Robinson and Co, Burbage.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £7 6s 3d was paid to his father on 21st March 1918 and a war gratuity of £12 10s was paid to the father on 15th November 1919.

 

Driver Edgar John Henry Bromwich 128351

Died of Wounds 24th April 1917

Royal Field Artillery

Quatre-Vents Military Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row C Grave 13

Age 21

Born Hinckley Enlisted Coventry

Son of Mr H and Mrs Bromwich, 10 Chessher Street, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 12TH MAY 1917

Mr and Mrs F Bromwich of 10 Chessher Street, Hinckley, have been officially informed that their eldest son, driver Edgar John Henry Bromwich, of the Heavy trench Mortar Battery of the Royal Field Artillery, was killed in action on April 24th. The deceased who was 21 years of age was formerly am assistant at the hairdressing shop in Stockwell Head of Mr. J Aucott.

Writing to the deceased’s bereaved parents, Second-Lieutenant A.S. Mott explains that the deceased was sleeping in a dugout with some other men when it was blown in by a shell and he died in an ambulance on the way to the dressing station. The deceased had been acting as an orderly most of the time with the battery. The officers and men of the Battery sent their sincere sympathy. Driver Bromwich enlisted on January 17th 1916 and went to France in August of the same year.

Army Registers of Effects: His brother Bernard received a payment of £7 17s 10d on 13th November 1917. He also received a war gratuity of £5 on 8th December 1919.

 

Private Ernest Brown 57386

Killed in Action 20th September 1917

14th Battalion The Northumberland Fusiliers formerly 164641 Royal Engineers

Huts Cemetery, Dikkebus, Belgium

Plot 6 Row D Grave 8

Age 30

Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Beatrice Brown, 92 Hinckley Road, Burbage.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £2 6s 5d on 31st January 1918 and a war gratuity of £5 on 15th November 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal Edward J Brown 42812

Killed in Action 20th September 1917

82nd Filed Company Royal Engineers

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Born Cambridge Enlisted Bath Living Cambridge

Husband of Mrs. Daisy J Brown, 20 London Road, Hinckley; Son of Mr and Mrs Brown, Queens Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 10th October 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 13TH OCTOBER 1917

Mrs. Brown of 20 London Road has been informed that her husband, Sapper E Brown of the Royal Engineers, was killed in action on September 20th.

In a letter to the widow, who is left with one child, Sapper H Daniels of St. Peter’s Road, Leicester, states that a party of Engineers, among them the deceased, were in a wood when a shell burst over them, one of the fragments striking the deceased and killing him almost immediately. Sapper Brown’s remains were laid to rest near a church, with military honours. Before joining up, Sapper Brown was employed by Mr. John Abbott, painter of the Borough and was the son of Mr and Mrs W Brown of Queens Road.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a sum of £2 9s 3d on 24th January1918. She also received a war gratuity of £13 10s on 1st November 1919.

 

Private George Brown 1002

Killed in Action 31st October 1914

2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Age 25 Born Hinckley Enlisted Nuneaton Living Hinckley

Son of Mrs. Clara Farmer (formerly Brown) and the late Mr. Brown, 13 Ashby Road, Hinckley.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star.

HINCKLEY TIMES 26TH JUNE 1915

News was received at Hinckley yesterday (Thursday) to the effect that Private George brown 1002 of the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who many months ago was reported as missing, was killed at Zillebeke in October last. Brown was 26 years of age, had been in the army several years and only had a few months to serve at then outbreak of the war, being with the regiment in Malta at the time. Prior to becoming a regular soldier, he worked in the trimshop at Sketchley Dyeworks. He leaves a widow and one child. His mother lives at 13 Ashby Road, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His daughter Alice Lillian received a payment of 7s 6d on 8th December 1915 and a further payment of £3 6s 8d on 25th September 1919. His widow received a war gratuity of £1 13s 4d.

 

Private Walter Brown 235565

Died of Wounds 28th November 1916

2/4th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment formerly 45326 York Regiment

Etaples Military Cemetery, France

Plot 30 Row N Grave 5

Age 38

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 1918

In loving memory of our dear brother

Private W Brown

of the 2/4th East Lancashire Regiment

Died of wounds November 28th 1917

He’s gone, the one we loved so dear

To his eternal rest

He’s gone to heaven we have no fear;

To be forever blest

From his loving brother and sister

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £5 15s 3d was shared between his brothers and sisters – Eliza, James, Sarah A Briggs, Alice and Ada Biddles. A war gratuity of £3 was paid to his sister Ellen.

 

 

 

Corporal John Edgar Burchnall 592875

Killed in Action 6th November 1917

18th (County of London) Battalion (London Irish Rifles) London Regiment formerly 80413 Royal Army Medical Corps

Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel

Plot N Grave 82

Age 23

Born Hinckley Enlisted Birmingham Living in Birmingham

Son of Mr. J C and Mrs Alice M Burchnall, Castle Street, Hinckley

St Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living at 51 Castle Street and his occupation was as a printer’s apprentice. He had 5 sisters and 3 brothers – Edith, Francis, Alice, Clare, George, Stephen, Constance and Margaret.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – December 1917

The news of the death of the late Corporal John Edgar Burchnall, who was killed in action, whilst with the British forces in Palestine, was received on Saturday 24th. In his last letter home, October 22nd, he said that he could see the hills of Judea from where he stood and that the regiment was on the eve of going into action.

The deceased soldier joined the RAMC in November 1915 and underwent his training at Eastbourne and other places. About six or seven months later he was transferred to the 2/18 London Irish Rifles and after a fortnight’s training went to France in June 1916. Among the many battles in which he took part in whilst there was the victorious assault last November on the fortress of Beaumont Hamel which for nearly two years had been regarded as impregnable by the German staff. Soon afterwards he left for Salonika, where he was made Lance-Corporal and he received his second stripe later on whilst in Egypt.

Corporal Burchnall was a member of the Catholic Men’s Society and one occasion gave an interesting paper on the fascinating subject of astronomy. He was an old altar boy and served for some years in the sanctuary. At one time he was on the Rosary staff.

Being in the Holy Land we may presume that he died in sight of Calvary whilst fighting against the hereditary foe of Christianity – the Turk. His was a typical Crusader’s death – RIP.

 

HINCKLEY TIMES 1ST DECEMBER 1917

Corporal John Edgar Burchnall of the London Irish Regiment, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs J C Burchnall of Castle Street, Hinckley, was killed in action in Palestine on November 6th. He was 23 years of age.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £8 18s 10d on 24th June 1918 and a war gratuity of £9 10s on 18th November 1919.

 

Captain William Edwards Burdett

Killed in Action 29th August 1918

2/5th Battalion Kings Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment)

Queant Road Cemetery, Buissy, France

Plot 1 Row G Grave 9

Age 33

1911 Census: he was living at 6 Beckingham Road, Leicester and his occupation was Sporting Journalist.

National Probate Calendar June 1920: His address is given as 58 Hill Street, Hinckley and his wife as Lottie Mary Burdett. He left effects of £447 3s 8d

HINCKLEY TIMES

It is announced that Captain W. E. Burdett of the Kings Own Royal Lancaster Regiment was killed in action on 29th August, 1918. The news was relayed in a letter from the Colonel of the Regiment, Lt-Col Popham to Mrs. Burdett, wife of Captain Burdett. He wrote in the letter:: “It is with very great regret that I have to tell you of the very great loss to the Battalion in death in action of your husband, Captain W. E. Burdett. He was an officer in whom I had the greatest confidence and he proved himself a most gallant and devoted officer. He led his company into action on 29th August 1918, attacking a real fortress which the battalion carried with great success. None were however more gallant in the attack than your husband. His men would have followed him anywhere, as they did. He died a glorious death and his name will go down in the annals of the regiment as a hero, much beloved by all.

The late Captain Burdett was perhaps not so well known at his birthplace Hinckley than at Leicester, where for many years he was prominently connected with local journalism, particularly as a sporting writer, as a follower a few years ago of Leicester Fosse FC and the County Cricket Club. He displayed rare qualities of style and judgment and many will recall the brilliant copy he turned out in those days. Captain William Edward Burdett was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Charles Burdett, Hill Street, Hinckley.

From Officer Records: He was born on 2nd February 1885 at the Lawns, Hinckley

Son of Charles Burdett, Hosiery Manufacturer and Mrs Emily Burdett formerly Edwards.

Educated at Wyggeston Grammar School, Leicester.

He enlisted on 7th May 1915 with a Second Lieutenant Commission in the Territorial Force.

His height at enlistment was 5 feet 10 inches.

He was living at 127 Fishergate, Preston at enlistment

His widow, Lottie Mary Burdett, lived at 58 Hill Street, Hinckley

14th July 1917 – to be acting Captain from Lieutenant, whilst in a charge of a company

Letter to widow 5th November 1919 – “I beg to inform you that on the process of exhumation for the purpose of the concentration of isolated graves in cemeteries, the grave of Lieutenant W E Burdett was located 2,000 yards South East of Cagnicourt and his remains have been re-interred in Queant Road British Cemetery, North East of Bapaume. The new grave has been duly marked and registered in this office. The re-burial has been carefully and reverently carried out”

Army Registers of Effects: The Solicitor’s firm of Haxby, Partridge and Talbot received a sum of £197 3s 8d on 23rd June 1920.

 

Sapper Charles Thomas Burford 34592

Died of Wounds 6th December 1915

68th Field Company Royal Engineers formerly 55966 Royal Garrison Artillery

Helles Memorial to the Missing, Turkey

Panel 23 to 25

Age 19

Born Hinckley Enlisted Kendal Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Charles and Mrs Clara Jane Burford, Tower Villa, John Street, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 26 John Street, Hinckley and was still at school. He had 6 siblings – Emily, Ethel, Florence, Eveline, Olive and James.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to Egypt on 16th September 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 18TH DECEMBER 1915

It is with much regret that we record that Sapper Charles Burford of the 68th Field Company, Royal Engineers, has died in hospital in Alexandria, Egypt from wounds received in action in the Dardanelles in the earlier part of this month. Though Sapper Burford was hardly 19 years of age he stood six feet high and weighed 13 stones. He was extremely well-known and popular locally and as an engineer gave promise of a successful career. For 3 years he was a pupil at the electricity works in Nuneaton and early in August 1914, at the outbreak of the war, obtained an important position at the Kendal Electricity Company in Cumberland. He resigned his appointment to enlist the following December. For several sessions he was a student at the Leicester technical Education classes. No news has been received as to how Sapper Burford met his death. It is clear, however, that he must have been terribly wounded. A telegraph was received by his parents on Wednesday of last week which states that he was dangerously ill and four days later an official note was received informing the family of the death. The greatest sympathy will be felt for Mr and Mrs Burford and the family in the loss of so gallant and promising a son.

Army Registers of Effects: It records that he died aboard the Hospital Ship “Delta”. His Father received a payment of £7 6s 3d on 24th February 1916 and a war gratuity of £3 on 13th August 1919.

 

Private Lance Burford 9993

Killed in Action 14th July 1916

6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, France

Pier 2 face C Pier 3 Face A

Age 19

Son of Mr John Burford and Mrs Rhoda Burford, 9 Manor Street, Hinckley.

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was a Boot Clicker and lived with his parents and 11 siblings – Annie, Emma, Charles, Dorothy, Cyril, Laurie, Florence, Evelyn, Wilfred, Stanley and Sydney.

Medal Index Card: Victory medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 5th June 1915.

Service Record: At enlistment on 13th August 1914, his occupation is described as a Shoehand. He stood 5ft 9 inches. He was posted as a Private in the Leicestershire Regiment on 16th August 1914. He transferred to the Army Cyclist Corps 37th Division on 2nd June 1915. He transferred back to the 6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment on 5th August 1915. His identity disc was sent back to his Mother. He was admitted to a Field Ambulance with Chilblains on 14th November 1915 and was discharged on 24th November back to his unit. He was initially posted as missing.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £1 10s on 20th March 1917 and a war gratuity of £9 on 3rd October 1919.

 

Private Henry Burrows 351197

Killed in Action 18th April 1917

9th Battalion Royal Scots formerly Leicestershire Regiment

Hevin Farm British Cemetery, St. Laurent Blagny, France

Row C Grave 2

Born Leicester Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

His name was originally missed off the memorial but was added in November 2005.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

 

 

Private John Albert Burrows 4004

Killed in Action 1st July 1916

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, France

Pier 2 Face C Pier 3 Face A

Age 19

Born Ullesthorpe Enlisted Hinckley

Son of John and Susanna Burrows, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 75 Knighton Street, Leicester and was employed as a Machine Feeder. He lived with his mother and 2 siblings – Lillie and George.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 11th November 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES

In Loving Memory of Private John Albert Burrows 4004

Previously posted missing now concluded killed in action July 1st 1916

Aged 19 years

We know not the spot that hold you in keeping

We know not the hour you entered your rest

But one thing we know in waking or sleeping

Engraved in our hearts you still live in our breasts

His toil is past, his work is done

And he is fully blest

He fought the fight, the victory won

And he is at rest

From his loving Mother, Brother (France) Sister and Husband (Canada)

Coventry Road, Hinckley

Army Register of Effects: His mother received a payment of £2 17s 2d on 11th August 1917 and a war gratuity of £4 10s on 7th October 1919.

 

Private Stanley Burton 201986

Killed in Action 27th May 1918

6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Soissons Memorial, France

Mentioned on the family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Age 22

Enlisted in Hinckley

Son of Thomas and Elizabeth Burton, 26 Highfields Road, Hinckley

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

S Davis and Sons Factory Memorial Scroll (now in Hinckley and District Museum; original in the Imperial War Museum)

1911 Census: His address is given as 26 Highfields Road, Hinckley and his occupation as hosiery – warehouse.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal

Service Record

Born 1895. Attested and enlisted on 26th November 1915. He was employed as a hosiery hand. He stood 5ft 10ins. He served at home from 26th January 1916 to 24th February 1917 and from 25th February 1917 in France. He embarked from Southampton on 24th February 1917 and disembarked on 25th February 1917 at Le Harve.

On 15th May 1917, he was sent to the Casualty Clearing Station suffering from trench feet. On 16th May he was admitted to the 2/1st North Midland Field Ambulance with trench feet. On the 18th May 1917 he was admitted to the 48th Casualty Clearing Station and on 19th May to the 1st Australian General Hospital at Rouen.

On 5th June 1917 he was sent to England on the hospital ship “Wanilda” from Rouen.

On 25th July 1917 he was sent to the Territorial Depot at Ripon where he spent 26 days in the hospital 25th July 1917 to 21st August 1917, with trench foot affecting his legs and feet. He embarked for France on 10th September 1917. On 11th September he was posted to 1/4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. On 18th September he was posted and joined the 6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment.

The following possessions were sent back to his relatives: Diary, Religious Books, Wallet, Photos and 1 card, which were received by his father.

His brothers were: Samuel Burton aged 41 (26 Highfields Road), Alfred Burton age 39 (43 John Street), Thomas Burton aged 35 (Fareham, Hants) and James Burton aged 31 (Nottingham).

It is perhaps conjecture but the fact that there were personal effects to return to the family suggests that at death the body may have had a temporary burial which was then lost, hence the commemoration on a Memorial to the Missing.

HINCKLEY TIMES 29th JUNE 1918

Private Stanley Burton has been killed in action in France on May 27th, with the Leicesters. He is the youngest son of Mr and Mrs T Burton of Highfields Road, Hinckley. He enlisted in January 1916 under the Derby Scheme. In early autumn, he went to France. He was sent home with trench feet but returned to take part in the Battle of the Somme. Before joining up he worked at Messrs S Davis and Sons. He was a member of the town Cricket Club and a teacher in the Sunday School.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £8 13s was paid to his father on 2ns September 1918 and a war gratuity of £10 10s was paid on 14th December 1919.

 

Private Albert Edward Buswell TR5/69448

Died of Pneumonia at Pocklington Camp 23rd March 1917

87th Training Reserve Battalion Royal Army Service Corps formerly M295885 Royal Army Service Corps

Age 33

Hinckley Cemetery

Section II Grave 366

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley Living in Hinckley

He as the son of Isaac and Amanda Buswell.

Enlisted in February 1917

Unitarian Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: Lived at 28 New Buildings, Hinckley. He was the husband of Mrs Florence Buswell. He was employed as a Tinsmith.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar – April 1917

We regret to say that Private Albert Edward Buswell, New Buildings, died of measles and acute bronchial pneumonia on Friday March 23rd at Pocklington Hall Camp, Allerthorpe, Near York and was buried on the following Monday in Hinckley Cemetery. Mr Buswell was 39 years of age and had but recently joined the 87th Training Reserve Battalion. He leaves a widow and an aged mother to mourn his loss and to these we extend our deep sympathy

On Sunday evening, April 1st, a Memorial Service was held to the late Edward Grove (civilian) and to Privates A E Buswell and L Warren. A solo “Into Thy Hands” was sung by Mrs Tompkin and the Dead March in “Saul” was played by our organist, Mrs Burgess.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £2 5s 8d was paid to his widow on 10th July 1917. There was no war gratuity.

 

Private Arthur Thomas Buswell 74973

Killed in Action 11th November 1917

Royal Garrison Artillery

The Huts Cemetery, Dikkebus, Belgium

Age 26

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr. Isaac and Mrs. Amanda Buswell, Hinckley; Husband of Mabel C Buswell, 81 Upper Bond Street, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 8TH DECEMBER 1917

It is officially announced that Private Arthur Thomas Buswell of the Royal Garrison Artillery was killed in action in France on November 11th at the age of 27 years. He was the son of Mr and Mrs I Buswell of Mount Road, Hinckley and leaves a widow who lives in Upper Bond Street.

HINCKLEY GRAMMAR SCHOOL MAGAZINE

Autumn Term 1917

Arthur Thomas Buswell (1903 – 1906), enlisted in the Royal Garrison Artillery, April 1915; trained at Yarmouth, Inch Keith, Aldershot and Lydd. Went to France August 1916; returned home wounded November; rejoined at Christmas; proceeded to Gosport and Price’s Heath Camp, Shropshire. Returned to France June 1917. Killed in Action, November 11th 1917. Aged 27.

 

 

 

Sergeant Stanley Frederick Butler 241872

Died of Wounds 4th September 1918

2/4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment attached 103rd Trench Mortar Battery

La Clytte Cemetery, Rehinghelst, Belgium

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Age 21

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr. Frank Butler and Mrs Ada Butler, 42 Charles Street, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist memorial, Hinckley.

Individual Memorial Plate in the Methodist Chapel, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 42 Charles Street with his parents and was employed as an Office Boy. He had four siblings – William, Nellie, Doris and Winnie.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 5TH OCTOBER 1918

Mr and Mrs T F Butler of 42 Charles Street, Hinckley have been informed of the official; news that their youngest son, Sergeant S F Butler died from wounds on 4th September, received in action with the Trench Mortar Battery.

LEICESTER DAILY MAIL 1ST OCTOBER 1918

S.F. Butler, a well-known Hinckley NCO has been killed in action in France. According to his officer, Captain O.B. Palmer, he died as a soldier and a gentleman, doing his duty. Sergeant Butler joined the army at the age of 18 and fought in many of the memorable battles of the last 18 months. In civilian life he was a member of the Hinckley Methodist Church, Chairman and Secretary of the Christian Endeavour, a member of Hinckley Liberal Club and a much respected worker at G Bott and Sons Ltd, Hosiery Manufacturers, Hinckley. A special memorial service was held in connection with Sergeant Butler’s death at the Primitive Methodist Chapel on Sunday, when suitable reference was made by Rev. H. Allcock. Appropriate hymns were sung. Mr. E Hartshorn sang the solo: “Nearer My God to Thee” and the organist played the Dead March and “O Rest in the Lord”. There was a large and sympathetic congregation.

Army Register of Effects: States that he died in the 104th Field Ambulance. His mother received a payment of 36 12s 8d on 2nd December 1918 and a war gratuity of £13 on 5th December 1919.

 

 

 

Private William George Butler 183362

Died 29th March 1920 from influenza at a house in Druid Street, Hinckley.

Labour Corps Hinckley Cemetery

Age 28

Brother of the above.

Son of Mr Frank Butler and Mrs Ada Butler, 42 Charles Street, Hinckley. Husband of Mrs. May Butler.

1911 CensusAge 26

Born pan>

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £4 9s 9d on 14th August 1920.

 

Private Percy Carter 22489

Died 10th July 1916

2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Amara War Cemetery, Iraq

Plot 9 Row H Grave 16

Age 20

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr John Thomas Carter, Barwell Lane, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He lived at 14 Mansion Street, Hinckley with his parents Mr John Carter and Mrs Frances Carter. He was employed as a Runner On in the Hosiery trade.

HINCKLEY TIMES 15TH JULY 1916

A second victim of extreme heat in the Persian Gulf is Private Percy Carter. Twenty Nine years of age he was the son of Mr and Mrs John Carter of Bath Villa, Barwell Lane, Hinckley. He served with the 2nd Battalion Leicestershire regiment. He died on July 10th. He was previously employed at Atkins. Bros and enlisted on November 2nd 1914. He had been in the Persian Gulf for 10 weeks. He was quite a lad.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £2 19s 8d on 23rd April 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 30th October 1919.

 

 

Temporary Lieutenant Robert Meredith Carr

Killed in Action 29th May 1918

10th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment attached 1st Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment

Jonchery sur Vesle British Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row F Grave 20

Age 29

Primitive Methodist Memorial, Hinckley.

From Officer Records: He was the only child of Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Carr, 60 Hill Street, Hinckley.

He was born on 12th December 1888 at Douglas, Isle of Man.

He resided at 60 Hill Street, Hinckley.

He enlisted on 27th November 1915.

He previously held a commission in the Cadet Battalion Leicestershire regiment and had attended an unofficial course at the Cambridge University OTC. In a telegram received by his mother on 30th January 1917 it is stated that he had been admitted to the 4th General Hospital at Boulogne with a severe fracture of the tibia.

From Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Summer Term 1918

Robert Meredith Carr, a master at Hinckley Grammar School from September 1914, born at Douglas, Isle of Man, December 12th 1888, joined the army and received a Commission on January 1st 1916.

He received his training at Fort Penbrook (Hants) and subsequently at Gateshead and Leeds. He was in France in August, broke his ankle and was in hospital in Manchester on January 2nd 1917. After being sent to Killinghome (Lincs), Grimsby, Brockton Camp (Stafford) and Cork, he returned ton France. He was originally in the 11th Lincolnshires, then the 3d Lincolnshires and after hospital, the 10th Lincolnshires. He was attached to the 1st Lincolnshires on his return to France. He was killed in action, May 29th 1918. He was aged 29.

From Major W H G Goater, 1st Lincolnshire regiment to Mrs. Carr….

It is with deepest regret that I have to rite you these few lines to tell you that your son, Lieutenant Robert M Carr, of my Battalion, was killed in action on the 29th. It may solace you somewhat to know that he died fighting bravely leading his men. As we were being heavily punished at the time only the staunchness of such as your son saved us. Please accept the deepest sympathy of myself, officers and NCOs and men of the Battalion in your sad loss”.

From W Davies to Mrs Carr……

I was glad of having the opportunity to meet your son here and our few hours together I shall never forget. We were both extremely excited at meeting each other. The day after I heard that he had been fatally wounded. I made enquiries concerning him when we came out of action, for we were some distance apart ion the day. I ultimately found a man who was with him when he was hit and he verified the sad news. The man told me that Rob could not possibly have suffered as he was killed instantaneously. He was full of praise for Rob and said how well he treated the men, and how thoroughly he did his work – he was conscientious to a fault. Ron was undoubtedly a fine soldier and most faithful to duty. I have spoken to many regarding him and although he was only with the Battalion a short time, he had gained a high place in the respect of all and was quickly becoming popular with the men. At the time he was acting Company Commander and had the confidence of all”.

HINCKLEY TIMES 15TH JUNE 1918

It is announced that Lieutenant Robert Meredith Carr BA, former Assistant Master at Hinckley Grammar School has been killed in action with the Lincolnshire Regiment on May 29th aged 29 years. He was educated at Elmfield College, York and came to the Grammar School as Master of Modern Languages in September 1914. He was extremely fond of athletics and excelled in the playing fields. He studied for cadet work at Cambridge University Training Corps and obtained a commission as a Second Lieutenant in 1915. He is the son of the late Robert Carr, minister of the Primitive Methodist Chapel.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £149 1s 2d on 31st March 1919.

 

 

 

Private Jack Cassell 4260

Killed in Action 25th April 1915

1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Age 32

Born Hinckley Enlisted Nuneaton Living in Bedworth

Wesleyan Methodist Memorial, Hinckley

Unitarian Memorial, Hinckley

Bedworth War Memorial

1911 Census: Living at 7 Wyatts Yard, Leicester Street, Bedworth. His occupation is given as Coal Miner Filler. He is married to Jane Cassell and has two children Elsie (4) and Patience (2)

Medal Index Card:  Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He arrived in France on 4th January 1915

Hinckley Great Meeting Chapel Monthly Calendar – September 1915

Died of Wounds

Pte. Jack Cassell, 1st Warwickshire Regt, Expeditionary Force, France.

Mr Cassell was an old scholar of our Sunday School, for some time a member of our choir and a playing member of the Great Meeting Football Club. He was mortally wounded on Friday April 23rd and found dead a few days later in St. Julien’s Wood. Our deep sympathy from the School and Church is with his wife and three children living at 101 York Buildings, Bulkington Lane, Bedworth.

Hinckley Great Meeting Chapel Monthly Calendar - November 1915:

On Sunday Evening, October 24th, a Memorial Service to Privates Gordon Jennings, Jack Cassell and Walter Pratt, was held in the chapel. Miss Elsie Fleming sang “O Rest in the Lord” and the “Dead March in Saul” was played by the organist Mr F Davenport.

“No longer on their ears

The bugle’s summons falls;

Beyond these tangled spheres

The Archangel’s trumpet calls”

HINCKLEY TIMES 11TH SEPTEMBER 1915

Hinckley people will regret to hear that Private Jack Cassell of the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, a native of Hinckley, has been killed in action in France. The deceased soldier was the youngest son of the late Mr. Thomas Cassell of Hinckley and was a well-known and popular local singer and footballer. Many years ago he assisted the Great Meeting Club when they were at the zenith of their power. Cassell, who was 32 years of age, leaves a widow and three children. In recent years he resided at Bedworth. He was a carpenter by trade.

Army Register of Effects: A war gratuity of £3 was paid to the widow.

 

Private Stanley Horace Cassell 25032

Killed in Action 15th September 1916

1st Battalion Leicestershire regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, France

Pier 2 Face C Pier 3 Face A

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living at 6 Duke Street, Hinckley and was employed as a House Painter. He lived with his mother Mrs. Elizabeth Cassell and two siblings – Leslie and Santley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 21ST OCTOBER 1916

Private Stanley Horace Cassell of the Leicestershire Regiment on 15th September. The deceased was 24 years of age, who married and joined up in February 1916. He worked with his brother Mr. P Cassell, painter of Queens Road, Hinckley. He had only been married a few weeks.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow, Mrs. Rhoda Cassell, received a sum of £2 11s 8d on 15th January 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 1st October 1919.

 

Private Alfred Chamberlain 20169

Died 10th June 1915

10th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Hinckley Cemetery

Section 4 Grave 31

Age 29

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of John and Mary Ann Chamberlain, 92 Walton Terrace, Coventry Road, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

His name was originally missed of Hinckley War Memorial but was added in 2005.

1911 Census: Employed as an office clerk. He had 6 siblings – Lily, Tom, John, James, Gladys and Arthur.

Army Register of Effects: States that he committed suicide by drowning in the Ashby Canal. The sum of £2 1s was paid to his father on 15th November 1915.

 

Private William Henry Chawner 61745

Killed in Action 9th March 1917

136th Company (Infantry) Machine Gun Corps formerly 15889 Leicestershire Regiment

Basra Memorial to the Missing, Iraq

Age 35

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Brother of Mrs. Caroline P Bedford, the Spa, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Memorial, Hinckley

Census 1911: He was lodging at 76 Coventry Road, Hinckley and was employed as a printer.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star.

HINCKLEY TIMES 7TH APRIL 1917

Among the Hinckley men who fell in the fighting in Mesopotamia on March 9th at Baghdad was Private William Henry Chawner who many years back was one of Hinckley’s well known and respected businessmen. The deceased who was 34 years of age was not married. He left his employment at the printing office of Messrs. Pickering and Sons in the Borough to join the army after the outbreak of the war.

Army Registers of Effects: His sister received a sum of £4 12s 2d on 2nd December 1920.

 

Private Edward James Cheaney 81062

Killed in Action 16th April 1918

15th Battalion Durham Light Infantry formerly 18267 Hussars

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Age 39

Born Wiggington, Warks Enlisted Nuneaton Living Stockingford

Husband of Mrs Annie Maria Cheaney, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living at 37 London Road, Hinckley with his wife Annie and one child – Elsie May. His occupation is recorded as Coal Miner Hewer.

Medal Index Card: He is recorded as also serving in the York and Lancaster Regiment. Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to Egypt on 5th September 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES

Private E J Cheaney was killed in action by a shell on March 16th 1918. Private Cheaney enlisted on December 10th 1914 and was sent to the Dardanelles and from there to Salonika. He was invalided home in November 1916 and went to France in 1917. Previous to enlisting he worked at the Haunchwood Colliery, Nuneaton. He leaves a widow and two children who at present reside in Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £6 3s 10d on 7th August 1918 and a war gratuity of £17 on 11th December 1919.

 

 

Private James Cheshire 44968

Died of Wounds 8th April 1920

10th Battalion Essex Regiment

Hinckley Cemetery

Section 11 Grave 236

Age 21

Son of Edward and Eliza Cheshire, 2 Druid’s Place, Lower Bond Street, Hinckley.

His name was originally missed off Hinckley War Memorial but was added in 2005.

1911 Census: He was a scholar, living in Nuneaton.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal

Service Record:  He enlisted on 24th February 1918. He was aged 18 years and 33 days. He stood 5ft 5ins tall. His father’s name is given as Edward Samuel Cheshire. His occupation is given as a quarry boy.

He served at home from 26th February 1918 to 11th August 1918. He was in France from 12th August 1918 to 24th September 1918 and served at home from 25th September 1918 to 8th April 1919.

Whilst in France he suffered a gunshot wound to his right arm on 23rd September 1918.

On enlistment he was attached to the 53rd (Young Soldier) Battalion Leicestershire Regiment and later transferred to the 3rd Battalion Essex Regiment.

He was discharged from the army on 8th April 1919. He suffered 30% disablement from his wound and was given a weekly pension of 8/3d, to be reviewed annually.

During his first period of service in this country he was deducted 4 days’ pay on 18th June 1918 as well as 2 days confined to barracks for irregular conduct and leaving work without permission. On 15th October 1918 during his second period at home he was confined to barracks for 5 days for being absent.

 

Private Albert Augustine Clarke 13160

Killed in Action 15th July 1916

D Company 8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial, France

Pier 2 Face c Pier 3 Face A

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Age 29

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs. Susan Clarke (nee Coley) and the late Mr. Austin Clarke, Woodbine Cottage, Clarence Road, Hinckley

St Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: His address is given as 32 Clarence Road, Hinckley and his occupation as hosiery warehouse. He had 9 siblings Mary, Laura, Bernard, Amy, Edith, Eliza, Annie, Alfred and Wilfred.

Medal Index Card: States that he first went to France on 29th July 1915. Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star.

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – August 1916

Many of us will miss also the cheery face of Lance-Corporal Augustine (“Gus”) Clarke of the D Company 8th Leicesters, who up to enlisting two years ago was the Hon. Secretary of St. Peter’s Cricket Club. He has been struck down in the prime of his life; he was in his 29th year. One of his companions was the first to send home the news and it was officially confirmed later. He had been just a year at the front and was home on leave a few months ago. Trones Wood was the scene of his death.

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – September 1916

From letters received since the announcement in our last issue we gather the following particulars of how Lance –Corporal “Gus” Clarke met his death and also learn that he fell,  not in Trones Wood, as was at first believed but in Bazentin-le- Petit Wood.

Lance- Corporal S Dilks, D Co, 8th Leicesters, in describing the gallant charge of the “Tigers” writes; “Our Company was in the first line of the charge and on the flank. I’ve lost all my pals, nearly all of them being killed or wounded. Our company got cut up more than any of them. I got my rifle smashed in two half way across, so had to stop and get a dead man’s rifle. I was about the eighth in the German trenches but they wouldn’t fight – they are cowards in close quarters. Gus Clarke and I went together and we shot a lot in the trench as they were running away. I dropped into a shell hole at the side of the trench firing at them but Gus stood up full length firing away. I saw him drop, shot in the head. We then drove them out with bombs”.

In another letter Lance-Corporal Dilks gave further news:  “Gus and I went across the top (of the parapet) together (as we said we would before the charge). We got to the German trench alright and when we saw the Germans there we opened fire on them; then I saw poor old Gus drop down. I looked at him and he was dead; he didn’t suffer in the least. Gus was buried later with some more of our boys, in a grave near where he fell, that is, just on the left of Bazentin-le-Petit wood.

In the words of another of his comrades, (Drummer B Baker): “Gus was a good soldier and a nicer chap you could not wish to speak to; and he was very much like by the comrades of his company. He died a glorious death and was a hero for his country” – RIP.

HINCKLEY TIMES 5TH AUGUST 1916

Mr and Mrs Austin Clarke of Clarence Road have recently been notified that their second son, Lance-Corporal Albert Augustine Clarke of D Company 8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment was killed in action in the recent fighting. He was shot through the head.

Of a quiet and unassuming nature, the deceased was a splendid type of fellow who had many friends locally. When war broke out, being a single man, he regarded it as his solemn duty to go to his country’s assistance and accordingly he gave up his immediate position in the hosiery factory of Messrs. Brocklehurst and Co, Upper Bond Street, Hinckley, to join the Khaki. Both in training in this country and later on in France he proved a fine soldier and was highly popular with his comrades. Before the war he was a prominent member of St Peter’s Roman Catholic Church and Honorary Secretary of St Peter’s Cricket Club. He was known throughout the Senior League as a fine player. He was 29 years of age.

Army Register of Effects: A sum of 32 4s was paid to his Father on 19th October 1916 and a war gratuity of £8 10s was paid on 2th September 1919.

 

 

 

Private Cyril Clarke 883

Killed in Action 30th April 1915

15th Battalion Australian Infantry, 4th Infantry Brigade AIF

Son of Mr. George Smith Clarke and Mrs. Catherine Clarke, Mill View, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 19 Mill View, Hinckley and was employed as a carpenter’s apprentice. He lived with his Father, Mr George Clarke and two siblings – Sidney and Frederick.

Service Record from Australian archives:

He gave his next of kin as Mr. W Clarke, a brother, of the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, in Singapore. The Australian authorities also recorded a brother Mr. A G Clarke, of Hollycroft, Hinckley. He was employed as a carpenter. He had served 12 months in the Leicestershire Territorials. He enlisted on 30th September 1914, at Lismore, New South Wales. He sailed from Melbourne on the ship “Ceramic” on 22nd December 1914. He was in the Mediterranean theatre of war on 12th April 1915. He stood 5ft 9 inches. The record shows that he was killed by a bullet wound to the head and was buried on the side of Hill 10, right of the landing place at Gabe Tepe, at the southern point of Anzac Cove. The officiating Chaplain

was a Rev J Green. The family were eventually to ask for 12 photographs of the grave from the authorities in September 1922 via a Mr. Clarke of 27 Castle Street, Hinckley. Each photograph cost them 3d. In the will he made for the army authorities, Private Clarke left all his effects to a Mrs. E E Hough, 13 Mill View, Hinckley. One brown paper parcel and his identity disc were removed from the deceased’s possessions which were dispatched to England on 15th March 1916. His family or legatee engaged Preston Son and Flavell, Solicitors of Hinckley, to write to the Australian authorities on 28th May 1917 to enquire about any back pay owing to the legatees.

He was awarded the Victory Medal, the British War Medal and the 1914-1915 Star. A memorial plaque and a memorial scroll were dispatched to the family in 1922.

HINCKLEY TIMES 19TH JUNE 1915

News has been received by his parents in Mill View from the death of wounds while in action of Private Cyril Clarke aged 19 years who emigrated to Australia 12 months ago and joined the Australian army soon after the declaration of war. Private Clarke was well known in Hinckley and District. Before leaving Hinckley he worked at the Boot Factory of Messrs. Clarke Ward and Co in Mill View, his brother being a partner in the firm. The deceased was not destined to stay in the land of the “perpetual sun” for his regiment was soon ordered to proceed to Egypt and later the Dardanelles. The gallantry of the Australians against the Turks has been one of the striking features of the operations at Gallipoli. Particulars of Clarke’s death are not yet to hand. The announcement came as a great shock to his relatives and friends.

 

 

 

Private George Henry Clarke 4351

Killed in Action 15th April 1918

1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Panels 2 and 3

Born Hinckley Enlisted Birmingham

His name was originally missed off the memorial but was added in October 2005.

1911 Census: he is living at 164 Spring Hill in Birmingham, with his parents Mr Samuel and Mrs. Elizabeth Clarke and 4 siblings – Samuel, Elsie, Wilfred and Ezekiel.

Medal Index Card: States that he was in the 2nd Battalion and was a Lance-Corporal. Victory medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 14th May 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of£13 9s 7d on 27th November 1918 and a war gratuity of £17 on 18th November 1911.

 

Private Horace Clarke 365856

Died 3rd December 1918

1/7th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers.

Hinckley Cemetery

Section 3 Grave 189

Age 21

Son of Amos and Millicent Clarke, 12 Manor Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 38 Manor Street, Hinckley and was employed in a Hosiery trade warehouse.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He was 18 years old and was a shoe hand in the boot trade. He stood 5ft 5ins tall. He had his recruitment medical board on 22nd May 1917 and was posted to the 3rd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment at Partington Barracks on 27th May 1917. He had previously attested for service on 23rd August 1916.On 5th January 1918 he was transferred to the 9th Battalion Royal Defence Corps and on 16th Mach 1918 he was transferred to the 3rd Battalion Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. He transferred to the 29th Battalion Durham Light Infantry on 20th June 1918. On 3rd July 1918 he embarked for France with the 20th Service Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry.

On 10th August 1918 he was admitted to the 96th Field Ambulance with what appeared to be problems around the site of a previous fracture of a toe in the left foot. He was transferred the same day to the 62nd Casualty Clearing Station and then onto the 13th General Hospital at Calais on the same day. On the 18th August he was transferred to the 30th General Hospital in England aboard the hospital ship “Cambria”. He spent 38 days in hospital and was sent home on leave from 24th September 1918 to 30th September 1918.

On 20th November 1918 he was attached to the Sherwood Foresters after being posted to the 3rd Reserve Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers.

He was demobilised from the 3rd Battalion Durham Light Infantry and his home address is given as 5 Half Moon Yard, Hinckley.

His religion is given as Primitive Methodist; his marital status as single and his occupation as a miner.

HINCKLEYTIMES 11H JANUARY 1919

Private Horace Clarke of the 1/7th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, son of Mr and Mrs Clarke of 12 Manor Place, Hinckley has died from pneumonia while at home on leave from France.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £2 17s 10d was paid to his widow, Alice, on 4th October 1920 at the same time as a war gratuity of £11.

 

Private John Clarke 3669

Killed in Action 23rd October 1914

1st Dragoons (Royals)

Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Age 25

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs. Wilson, Ten Foot (Gopsall Road), Hinckley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star. He first went to France on 8th October 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES 19TH DECEMBER 1914

It is officially reported that Private Clarke of the 1st Dragoons, a son of Mrs. Wilson of Ten Foot, Hinckley, was killed in action at a place not stated sometime during the last month.

Private Clarke enlisted in the Dragoons five and a half years ago. He was for two and a half years stationed with his regiment in Africa and also saw 18 months service in India. He returned from Africa at the beginning of September and after 3 days at Hinckley proceeded to the Front. Clarke was an unmarried man of 25 years of age. It is believed that he was shot whilst out scouting.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £2 10s 11d on 24th April 1915, along with his sister Elizabeth, Mary A and half-brothers Horace and Albert. The siblings received £1 5s 5d each. His Mother, Annie Wilson, received a war gratuity of £5 on 21st August 1919.

 

Private John William Clow 13082

Died of Wounds 30th September 1916

8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt L’Abbe, France

Plot 5 Row B Grave 9

Age 29

Born Barwell Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs. Clow, 17 John Street, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 7 Spring Gardens with his wife Jennie and one daughter Jennie. He was employed as a Wool Warehouseman.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914- 1915 Star. He first went to France on 29th July 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES

Private John William Clow of the Leicestershire Regiment has died of wounds in a military hospital on 30th September 1916. The deceased was aged 29. He leaves a widow and three children who live at 17 John Street, Hinckley. The Father and the Mother of the deceased live in Barwell. Prior to enlisting the deceased worked for A E Hawley at the Sketchley Dyeworks.

Army Registers of Effects:  His wife received a payment of £5 17s 2d on 24th February 1917 and a war gratuity of £8 10s on 6th October 1919.

 

Private Francis Colkin 235067

Killed in Action 30th July 1917

17th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire regiment) formerly 7604 Leicestershire Regiment

Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Panel 39 tom41

Age 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr. Francis Colkin and Mrs Emma Colkin, Hinckley; Husband of Rose Colkin, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 19 Grove Street with his parents and 3 siblings- Rose, William and Emma

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He enlisted in 8th February 1917 and was living at 21 Grove Street, Hinckley. He was employed as a Hosiery Hand. He stood 5ft 61/2 inches. He married Rose Edwards on 5th February 1910. They had one child Francis Reginald who was born on 23rd October 1911. He went to France on 17th May 1917 and disembarked at Boulogne. He was transferred to the Notts and Derbys on June 17th 1917. His widow was granted a pension of 22/11 per week for herself and two children on 25th February 1918

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £ 2 5s 5d on 2nd January 1918 and a war gratuity of £3 on 16th December 1919.

 

Guardsman Ernest John Collier 24893

Killed in Action 4th February 1917

4th Battalion Grenadier Guards

Combles Communal Cemetery, Combles, France

Plot 2 Row C Grave 29

Age 21

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester

Son of Mr Charles and Mrs Emma Collier, 14 Thorneycroft Road, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

S Davis and Sons Factory Memorial Scroll (now in Hinckley and District Museum; original in the Imperial War Museum)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 14 Thorneycroft Road, Hinckley along with 4 siblings – Annie, Horace, Doris and William. He was employed as a Hosiery Hand Winder.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 3RD MARCH 1917

Mr and Mrs Collier of 14 Thorneycroft Road, Hinckley have been notified that their second son, private Ernest J Collier of the 4th Battalion Grenadier Guards was killed in action on 4th February. Writing to his parents, Rev. A Llewellyn-Jones, the Church of England Chaplain to the Grenadier Guards says: “It is with great regret and earnest sympathy that I write this sad news to you. It was shell fire that killed him. You will no doubt be comforted to know that I was able to hold a service for him just behind the lines. His Company Commander and Adjutant of the Battalion were both present at the funeral.

In another letter received by the parents, Second-Lieutenant Bertram J Hubbard says: “I am just writing to offer my most sincere sympathy in the terrible loss you have sustained by your son’s death. I was his platoon officer and though I had not known him for very long, I knew enough to realise that he was one of the very best and most cheerful workers in the platoon. He was a favourite with all of the others and his place will be hard to fill”. Private Collier enlisted on December 2nd 1915, trained at Caterham and went to France in August of last year.

In the happy days of peace he was a member of the Hinckley Branch of the National League of Young Liberals.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £4 3s 7d on 21st April 19178 and a war gratuity of £ 10s on 20th October 1919.

 

Private John Henry Collier 10782

Killed in Action 21st March 1918

2nd Battalion Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment)

Pozieres Memorial to the Missing, France

Panel 64

Age 35

Born Battersea Enlisted Birmingham Living Hinckley

Husband of Mrs. Daisy Collier, 67 Duke Street, Hinckley.

Brother of the above.

St. Paul’s Church Memorial, now in St. Mary’s Parish Church, Hinckley.

1911 Census:  He was living at 67 Duke Street, Hinckley with his wife and one child – Frank. He was employed as a Grocery Assistant.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 12th September 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 11TH OCTOBER 1919

Mrs. Collier of 67 Duke Street, has been officially informed that her husband, Private John Henry Collier, of A Company, 2nd Wiltshire Regiment, who was reported missing on 21st March of last year, was killed in fighting near St. Quentin on that day. Private Collier is believed to have been shot through the head by a sniper and comrades who have returned to this country since the Armistice are able to say that they saw him fall dead in a trench during the particularly heavy fighting on the date mentioned. The late Private Collier was 35 years of age and leaves a widow and four children. He was a member of St. Mary’s Church, a popular member of the Constitutional Club and a much respected employee of the Hinckley Co-Operative Society. He joined the forces in the early days of the war and landed in France 12 months after enlistment. Three months later he proceeded to Salonika, was invalided home and crossed to France a second time in October 1917. By those to whom he was known, the deceased was regarded as a good straight fellow who always played the game and a large circle of friends will deeply deplore his loss. He was the son of an old Crimean veteran, the late Mr. Charles Collier, whose widow lives at Thorneycroft Road, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects:  His widow received a payment of £31 5s 3d on 22 October 1919 which included a war gratuity of £20 10s.

 

Private Percy Colver 25636

Died 5th December 1916

7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Bethune Town Cemetery, France

Plot 6 Row A Grave 22

Age 21

Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Joseph and Mrs Edith Colver, Hinckley. Native of Earl Shilton.

1911 Census: He was living at 109 London Road, Hinckley with his parents and 4 siblings – Miriam, William, Hannah and James. He was employed as a Shoe Hand (Rivetter).

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £4 4s 2d on 18th April 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 27th July 1919.

 

Private George Cope 12665

Died 30th June 1916

9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Basra Memorial to the Missing, Iraq

Panel 9

Age 49

Born Warton, Warks Enlisted Nuneaton Living Hinckley

Husband of Mrs Clara Cope, Fox Yard, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at Watery Lane, Sheepy Magna with his wife and three children – Horace, William and Clara. He was employed as a timbering miner.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 15TH JULY 1916

Private George Cope of the 9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire regiment, a Hinckley man, whose home is Fox Yard, Trinity Lane, has succumbed to excessive heat in Mesopotamia. Though 49 years of age, Cope showed his patriotism by enlisting shortly after the outbreak of the war. He was a big powerful man who had fine soldier like qualities. He worked in a colliery He leaves a widow and three children.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £2 12s 2d on 14th February 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 10s on 9th September 1919.

 

Private John Thomas Cope 29852

Died of Wounds 12th August 1917

11th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment formerly 35955 Worcestershire Regiment

Locre Hospice Cemetery, Belgium

Plot 1 Row B Grave 24

Born Hartshill Enlisted Warwick Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Thomas and Mrs Elizabeth Cope, 86 Rugby Road, Hinckley

His name was originally missed of the memorial but was added in October 2005

1911 Census: he was living with his parents in Witherley and he was still at school. He had 3 siblings – Kate, William and Emma.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal

HINCKLEY TIMES 1ST SEPTEMBER 1917

Signaller John Thomas Cope of the Warwickshire Regiment was killed in action in France on August 12th 1917. Tom Cope joined the Worcestershire Regiment when he was 18 ½ years old and went ou to France on July 17th 1917 and was transferred to the Warwicks. After less than a month in France a German shell exploded near to him, wounding him in the leg and he died in a dressing station. Before joining up he was serving an apprenticeship with R Fox, Builder of Atherstone.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £2 2s 8d on 24th October 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 21st November 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal John Copeland 57233

10th Battalion The Prince of Wales’s Own (West Yorkshire Regiment)

Montay-Neuvilly Road Cemetery, Montay, France

Plot 2 Row A Grave 14

Age 20

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs Clara Copeland and the late Mr John Copeland, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Davis and Sons Factory Memorial Scroll (now in Hinckley and District Museum; original in the Imperial War Museum)

1911 Census: He was living with his mother at 14 Leicester Road, Hinckley. He had 3 siblings – Ada, William and George

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES

In ever loving memory of our dearly beloved

JACK

Who on 20th October 1918 in the 21st year of his age, passed from this cruel, cruel world, we hope to enter a kinder one. Oh, how much we all loved him and bitterly mourn his loss. We also desire to thank the many friends for their expressions of sympathy shown to us in our greatest sorrow, hoping that they will accept this, the only intimation. Mrs J Copeland and family, 14 Leicester Road.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £15 11s 1d on 4th September 1919 which included a war gratuity of £7 10s.

 

 

Private Edward Charles Cotton 43400

Died 15th August 1918

11th Battalion Essex Regiment formerly 25771 Leicestershire Regiment

Hinckley Cemetery

Section 3 Grave 215

Born in Hinckley Enlisted in Hinckley Living in Hinckley

Age 31

Son of the late Mr Edwin Cotton and Mrs Ruth Cotton, Queens Park, Hinckley

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial

1911 Census: He was living at 26 Davenport Terrace, Hinckley and was a Grocer’s assistant.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal

HINCKLEY TIMES 31ST AUGUST 1918

Private Edward Cotton of the Essex Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Cotton, Queens Park, Hinckley, has died from the effects of German poison gas.

Army Register of Effects: He died in the general Hospital in Leicester. The family received £25 12s 9d on 20th November 1918 to cover funeral expenses. His father received £3 2s 6d. A war gratuity of £11 was paid on 2nd October 1919 to the father.

 

 

Private George Henry Cotton 49694

Killed in Action 31st July 1917

20th Battalion Durham light Infantry formerly 149784 Royal Field Artillery

Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Age 30

Born Burbage Enlisted Newcastle Living Hinckley

Son of Mr. Thomas Cotton, Waterloo Square, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Florence Elizabeth Cotton, Atherstone.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his Grandparents Mr John and Mrs Jane Cotton, 7 Waterloo Square, Hinckley. He was employed as a carpenter.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He enlisted on 10th December 1915, first with the Royal Field Artillery and was living at 3 Theatre Buildings, Hinckley. He was 28 years of age. He married his wife Florence Elizabeth Cotton, nee Garratt, at Baddesley Ensor on 24th March 1913.They had one son – Thomas Henry – born 2nd March 1915. His widow was given a pension of 18/9d per week on 1st April 1918. She had received a separation allowance of 16/- and an allotment of pay of 3/6d. He first went to France on 4th November 1916 with the 85th Training Reserve Battalion and was posted to the 13th Durham Light Infantry initially and back to the 8th Durham Light Infantry on 19th November 1916. He was admitted to the 24th General Hospital at Etaples on 20 December 1916. He was sent back to England on 12th January 1917. He returned to France on 11th June 1917 and was posted at Boulogne to the 20th Battalion Durham Light Infantry.

His wife and child moved to The Laurels, New Street, Baddesley Ensor to live. He had reported sick on 17th December 1916 with pains all over his body and was detained for 24 days. He had no temperature. On January 24th 1917 his temperature rapidly rose and then rapidly fell. He was complaining of kidney pain. His temperature remained normal and he was placed on iron tonic. He was looked after at the Military Hospital at Clifton Park in Blackpool. He received massage treatment and undertook physical exercises. He was initially reported as Missing but later presumed to have been killed.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £2 7s 1d on 1st October 1918 and a war gratuity of £4 10s on 28th October 1919.

 

Second-Lieutenant John James Cox

Died of Wounds 29th May 1915

2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Mervile Communal Cemetery, Merville, France

Age 36

Husband of Lillian Beatrice Cox, Crown Terrace, The Borough, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

From Officer Records: Sion of Mr William Cox, 2 Grove Street, Hinckley. He had two brothers – Thomas and William and four sisters Caroline, Selina, Elizabeth and Mary. He enlisted as a Private 5233 on 11th February 1898 in the 2nd Battalion Leicestershire regiment at Hinckley at the age of 18. He had previously served in the Militia although he had previously been rejected a being underweight.

Height 5ft 6 inches

His religious denomination was given as Church of England. He was described as having scars over both eyebrows.

He was promoted as follows;

Lance Corporal 31.3.1900

Demoted for bad conduct 15.12.1904

Loses Good Conduct Badge 7.2.1908

Promoted Lance Corporal 7.8.1908

Promoted Corporal 27.10.1910

Promoted Lance Sergeant 31.3.1911

Promoted Sergeant 23.10.1912

Promoted Second Lieutenant 30.11.1914

He served as follows:

Home 11.12.1898 to 6.2.1900

Egypt 7.2.1900 to 13.12.02

Home 14.12.1902 to 20.9.1906

India 21.9.1906 to 5.2.1914

Home 6.2.1914 to 29.11.1914

He was qualified as a shoeing smith in the army

10 days after enlistment he was injured playing football at Glen Parva Barracks – the Court of Enquiry came to the conclusion that there was no further action. He had a contusion of the right foot – 23rd March 1898.

He injured a foot on an iron railing on a bed. The Court of Enquiry – 21st October 1902 – concluded that there was no further action.

He was treated for disease 18.5.1903 to 4.6.1903

He was treated for an Ulcer 30.8.1904 to 23.9.1904

He was treated for Malaria 12.7.1913 to 19.7.1913

He married Lillian Beatrice Harris at St. John’s Church, Colaba, Mumbai on 9th December 1911

He died of wounds at the 6th Casualty Clearing Station 29th May 1915

His widow was then living at 8 Crown Terrace, the Borough, Hinckley.

His field kit was returned to his widow via Cox’s Shipping Agency Ltd, but enquiries by his widow for the whereabouts of his sword and revolver were unsuccessful.

HINCKLEY TIMES 5TH JUNE 1915

We deeply regret to record that 2nd Lieutenant John James Cox, a Hinckley officer belonging to the 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, died of wounds in a military hospital in France, 8am, Sunday last. A telegram from Lord Kitchener received by relatives in Hinckley on Monday of the present week announced the sad news. The deceased was struck by shrapnel in the stomach on May 22nd, the injuries were so severe that it was only possible to move him to a field hospital a short distance from the trenches.

Lieutenant Cox who rose from the ranks, had a brilliant career. He saw 18 years’ service in Egypt, India and Ireland and he returned from India in the early part of 1914 proceeding to Ireland as a full Sergeant. He was given a commission as a Second Lieutenant soon after his regiment went to France in September last. He fought in many engagements until the wounds that caused his death. Thirty One years of age, he was a fine type of soldier and climbed the ladder of success by sheer merit. He was popular with his brother officers and his death came as a great shock to all of those around him. He was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Cox of King Street. On December 19th 1911 he married Miss Harris of Hinckley. The remains of the deceased were laid to rest in the regimental cemetery somewhere in France on Monday afternoon last, those present including the Chaplain and officers of the 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £8 10s in November 1915.

 

Private Albert Edwin Crow 98046

Killed in Action 21st March 1916

10th Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers

Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Age 28

Born Chipping Norton Enlisted Nuneaton Living Hinckley

Son of Mr George and Mrs Margaret Ann Crow, 16 Mill View, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was a soldier serving in India.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star. He first went to France on 13th August 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES 1ST APRIL 1916

News is to hand that Albert Edwin Crow of the Royal Welch Fusiliers was killed in action on March 2nd. A letter from Lieutenant W B Morgan to the bereaved mother, who lives at 16 Mill View, Hinckley, states that the deceased was  most excellent soldier. Private Crow was 28 years of age. He had been 8 years with the colours, the greater portion of which had been spent in India. Before becoming a soldier he was employed at Sketchley Dyeworks.

He went to the front at the outbreak of the war and ought in many big battles being twice buried at La Bassee as the results of explosions and once gassed. He was in the hospital for some weeks in September last and returned to England to undergo an internal operation, a piece of shrapnel being taken out of his back. Crow returned to the front last December to take charge of a machine gun.

One of the deceased’s comrades forwarded a letter of sympathy to Mrs. Crow and in an account of the doings of the Welch Fusiliers suggests that on one occasion they marched for 20 hours with two hours rest covering 38 miles. The following day they continued the march and by nightime have covered a total of 70 miles in 30 hours. Mrs. Crow has another son and a stepson at the front.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of£31 8s 11d on 21st June 1916 and a war gratuity of £8 1os on 30th August 1919.

 

Private Ernest Horace Crow 240870

MILITARY MEDAL

Died of Wounds 5th June 1918

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Pernes British cemetery, France

Plot 2 Row F Grave 6

Age 23

Enlisted Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Son of Mr George Crow and Mrs Margaret Ann Crow, 16 Mill View, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Lily Crow, Nuneaton. Brother of the above.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

His name was originally missed off Hinckley War Memorial but was added in October 2005. His name appears on Nuneaton War Memorial.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 27th February 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 22ND JUNE 1918

Private Ernest Crow, who twelve months ago won the military medal, for a particularly brave signalling act, has died of wounds in France. He was the second son of Mr and Mrs Crow, 16 Mill View, Hinckley. He had been in France for over 3 1/2 years with the Leicestershire Regiment. He was 23 years of age. He was employed at Sketchley Dyeworks.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £2 7d on 12th August 1918 and a war gratuity of £17 on 24th November 1919.

 

Lance Corporal Ralph Crow 20718

13th April 1918

No 2 Company 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards

Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Panel 1

Age 20

Born Enderby Enlisted Glen Parva

1911 Census: He was living at John Street, Enderby and worked in the Stock Room of a Shoe Factory. He lived with his parents Mr John Crown and Mrs Maud Crow and 7 siblings – Oswald, Mabel, Dorothy, Beatrice, Albert, Walter and Frederick.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects; His mother received a payment of £12 17s 9d on 9th September 1918 and a war gratuity of £5 10s on 5th December 1919.

 

First Class Stoker David Crutchlow

Lost at Sea 12th January 1918

HMS Narborough wrecked outside Scapa Flow

Portsmouth Naval Memorial, United Kingdom.

Panel 30

Age 26

Husband of Mrs Crutchlow, 104 Mount Road, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents Mr David Crutchlow and Mrs Hannah Crutchlow at Violet House, Coventry Road, Bedworth with 4 siblings – Zillah, Samuel, Ethel and Herbert. His occupation was Coal Miner – Loader.

 

 

HINCKLEY TIMES 26TH JANUARY 1918

Able Seaman Stoker David Crutchlow of the Royal Navy has been drowned. He was informed that he had been drowned when HMS Destroyer…….struck rocks in a fearful gale off the Scottish coast. He was 26 years of age. He had served at the Battle of Jutland on board HMS Onslaught and had been in the navy seven years. His widow lives at 104 Mount Road, Hinckley.

HINCKLEY TIMES 1918

In ever loving memory of A B Stoker David Crutchlow (HMS….)

Who lost his life in the fearful gale 0f the Scottish coast January 12th 1918

I know not where my loved one rests amidst the angry waves

The might sea has claimed him

From all his loved ones here

Sad hearts are left to mourn him

Who was to them so dear

From his sorrowing wife, 104 Mount Road, Hinckley

 

Private John Dalby 1411

Killed in Action 13th May 1915

Leicestershire Yeomanry

Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Age 30

Born Hinckley Enlisted Burley Camp Living Hinckley

Husband of Mrs Annie Dalby, 63 Rugby Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 16th February 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £4 7d on 17th August 1916 and a war gratuity of £3 on 17th September 1919.

 

Private Ted Dalby 241759

Died of Wounds 22nd November 1917

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Rocquigny Equancourt Road British Cemetery, Manancourt, France

Plot 4 Row B Grave 25

Age 22

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Brother of the above

Son of Mr Willett and Mrs Marie Dalby, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 26TH JANUARY 1918

Private Ted Dalby of the Leicestershire Regiment has died of wounds in France on November 22nd 1917. Private Dalby was killed in the Cambrai battle and died of wounds to his leg and internal injuries. He had fought in the battle of Ypres. He joined up in 1916 and was 22 years old at the time of his death. He was previously employed as a horse slaughterer.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £4 3s 10d on 9th March 1918 and a war gratuity of £9 on 29th November 1919.

 

Roughrider William Henry Dalby RTS/3021

Died 28th September 1917

Royal Army Service Corps

Malo-les-Bains Communal Cemetery, Dunkirk, France

Row A Grave 20

Age 38

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley Living Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Husband of Mrs. Ellen Dalby, 11 Blockley’s Yard, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 11 Blockley’s Yard with his wife Ellen and 2 children – Ernest and Emma.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star. He first went to France on 26 September 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES 20TH OCTOBER 1917

Mrs Dalby of 11 Blockley’s Yard, Regent Street, Hinckley, has been notified that her husband Private William Dalby, a Roughrider with the Field Remount Section of the Fourth Army died in France on September 28th from injuries sustained by the kick of a horse. He had served as a roughrider since October 1914. He was aged 38 years. He leaves a widow and three children. He is the son of Mr and Mrs Dalby, Coventry Road, Hinckley. Prior to army service he helped his brother in the business of horse slaughterers.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £9 7s 11sd on 7th January 1918 and as Mrs Ellen Rawlinson, she received a war gratuity of £14 on 12th November 1919.

 

Private Sydney Dale 201895

Died of Wounds 18th September 1918

6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Five Points Cemetery, Lechelle, France

Row C Grave 5

Age 25

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester

Son of Mr George Dale and Mrs Sarah Ann Dale, nee Cuer, Leicester.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

His name was originally missed off the memorial but was added in 2014.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 22 Nutfield Road, Leicester and was employed as a Clothing Stores Apprentice. He had 4 siblings – Lilla, Florence, Doris and Cyril.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He attested on 3rd December 1915 and was called up on 8th January 1916. He stood 5ft 11 inches. He served at home from 22nd January 1916 to the 24th February 1917. He first went to France on 25th February 1917. His occupation was given as shop assistant. He was posted to the 2/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. He went with the regiment to Ireland and was in hospital in Fermoy from 29th August 1916 to 18th September 1916. His effects were returned to his mother who was living at 11 Braunstone Gate, Leicester. These included his identity disc, photos, a pocket book, a wallet, 2 metal cigarette cases, a watch, a cap badge and some cards. He disembarked at Le Harve on 25th February 1917. He was wounded on 24th March 1918 and was admitted to the 43rd Casualty Clearing station with a bullet wound to his hand and was subsequently admitted to the 14th General Hospital, with the same wound, at Wimereux, near Boulogne. He arrived at the Infantry Base Depot on 20th April 1918 and rejoined his unit on 23rd April 1918. He was granted leave to the UK from 18th June 1918 to the 2nd July 1918. On 27th August 1918 he was posted to the 6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment and joined “D” Company. He died in a Filed Ambulance of wounds on 18th September 1918. His mother had received a separation allowance of 7/4d.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £8 7s 4d on 23rd January 1919 and a war gratuity of £12 on the 11th July 1919.

 

 

Private George Daniels 10495

Killed in Action 10th August 1917

2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Basra Memorial to the Missing, Iraq

Panel 12

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Tom Daniels and Mrs Ann Daniels, 77 Stockwell Head, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 77 Stockwell Head and was employed as an Excavator. He lived with his parents and 6 siblings – Tom, Harry, Sam, Alice, Annie and Ada.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 29th July 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 7TH APRIL 1917

Private George Daniels, son of Mrs. T Daniels of 77 Stockwell Head, was killed in action at the Persian Gulf, on March 10th.

Private G Daniels volunteered with his brother Tom at the outbreak of the war. He went through a course of training at Aldershot for about 11 months and then proceeded with the Leicesters to France. About 12 months back he was wounded and came home for about 10 days, the wound not being a serious one.

Army Registers of Effects: His father Tom received a payment of £15 16s 1d on 20th December 1917. His mother received a war gratuity of £11 10s on 2nd January 1920.

 

Private Harry Daniels 22057

Killed in Action 19th September 1916

7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Guards Cemetery, Les Boeufs, France

Plot 3 Row H Grave 2

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Husband of Mrs Evelyn Daniels, 61 Duke Street, Hinckley. Son of Mr Tom and Mrs Ann Daniels, 77 Stockwell Head, Hinckley.

Brother of the above.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 77 Stockwell Head, Hinckley and 6 siblings – George, Tom, Sam, Alice, Annie and Ada.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record:  He enlisted on 25th October 1915. He married Evelyn Jeffs at the Wesleyan Chapel, Hinckley on 4th November 1915. His occupation is given as Shoe Finisher. He first went to France on 8th July 1916. His effects were returned to his widow – 1 Letter, 6 Cards, a Dictionary and a Wallet.

HINCKLEY TIMES 14TH OCTOBER 1916

Mrs. H Daniels of 61 Duke Street, Hinckley, has received an official notice stating that her husband, Private Harry Daniels of the Leicestershire Regiment was killed in action on September 9th.

A comrade states in a letter to his friends that he and Daniels were walking along the lines to enter the trenches for a second time when a shell exploded and Daniels was shot through the head and died immediately. He himself had a very narrow escape being wounded about the mouth and being blown into a hole. Private Daniels joined the army early in November last year and previous to his married life commanded the respect of his parents who said that he was always a good lad and never caused them any trouble.

The late Private Daniels was the son of Mr and Mrs Daniels of Stockwell Head, Hinckley. Before joining up as a Derby recruit he worked at the boot factory of Messrs Ney bros, Barwell. Two other brothers are at the front, one being in France, the other in Mesopotamia.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £1 16s 6d on 10th March 1917. She received a war gratuity of £3 on 25th September 1919.

 

Rifleman Harry Davey A/20248

Killed in Action 24th October 1917

9th Battalion Kings Royal Rifle Corps formerly R/4/127641 Army Service Corps

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Panel 115 to 119

Age 29

Born Hinckley Enlisted Nuneaton Living Hinckley

Son of Mr William and Mrs Kate Davey, 5 Manor Place, Hinckley.

1911 Census: he was living with his parents and was employed as a Coal Miner – Bondman. He had 3 siblings – George, Sarah and Lily.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 24TH NOVEMBER 1917

Rifleman Harry Davey, eldest son of Mr and Mrs William Davey of 5 Manor Place, Hinckley, has been killed in action with the Kings Royal Rifle Corps. He enlisted shortly after the outbreak of the war in the 1th Hussars and was transferred to the KRRC three weeks before falling in action. The deceased was 29 years of age and formerly worked at Messrs. Stanley’s colliery at Stockingford. His brother, who was wounded two years ago, has been discharged.

Army Registers of Effects: His father received a payment of £13 14s 9d on 9th April 1918 and a war gratuity of £14 on 11th November 1919.

 

Private Jim Davey 27095

Killed in Action 14th September 1918

9th Battalion (Pioneers) North Staffordshire Regiment

Bertincourt Chateau British Cemetery, France

Age 27

Husband of Florence Davey (nee Wilbur), 14 Highfields Road, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Unitarian Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: His parents were James and Mary Davey. His address is given as 60 Druid Street and his occupation as a pressman in a boot factory. He was single and had four siblings – Maud, Arthur, Sidney and Edith.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar – October 1918

It is our painful task to record the death in France of another of our men, Private Jim Davey, 9th North Staffs Regiment, who was killed in action on September 14th. He leaves a young widow who resides at 14 Highfields Road and parents residing at 60 Druid Street, to mourn his death. He was a quiet steady man and was held in much respect by a wide circle of acquaintances.

HINCKLEY TIMES 5TH OCTOBER 1918

Mrs. J Davey of 14 Highfields Road, has received official news that her husband Private J Davey of the North Stafford Regiment (Pioneer Battalion) has died in action after serving nearly two years in France.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £6 7s 3d was paid to his widow on 4th December 1918 followed by a second payment of 15s 5d on 6th August 1919. A war gratuity of £11 was paid on 20th December 1919.

 

Lieutenant Richard Samuel Davis

Killed in Action 21st March 1918

2/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment attached 4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Age 21

Son of Mr. Samuel Davis and Mrs. Beatrice Davis, Elmlea, Ashby Road, Hinckley.

St. Paul’s Church Memorial, Hinckley. (Now in St. Mary’s Church, Hinckley)

Family memorial, wall plaque, in St. Mary’s Church, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

S Davis and Sons Factory Memorial Scroll (now in Hinckley and District Museum; original in the Imperial War Museum)

1911 Census: He was a scholar at Marlborough College, Wiltshire.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal (now in Hinckley and District Museum) and British War Medal. He first went to France on 24th February 1917.

From Officer Records: He was born on 9th August 1896 and was educated at Marlborough College (May 1910 – 1914) He was a Second-Lieutenant in the Marlborough College OTC. He left the school on 21st December 1914.

He enlisted as Second Lieutenant on 21st February 1915. He stood 5ft 7 inches. He was initially posted as Missing in Action and his death was not officially confirmed until 19th September 1919.

His father repeatedly advertised in the “Times” for information as to his whereabouts but in vain.

Marlborough College records: His is listed as Prisoner, now presumed killed at Bullecourt, March 21st 1918. He was in B2 House. Richard Samuel Davis, the son of Mr S Davis of Hinckley, was at Marlborough College (B2) from May 1910 to December 1914. He played Racquets for the School in 1914. He joined the Leicester Regiment direct from Marlborough. In 1916 he was sent to Ireland at the time of the Dublin rebellion and in 1917 he went to France. He was appointed Intelligence Officer to the 177th Brigade (59th Division) and was reported missing on the first day of the German offensive 21st March 1918, near Bullecourt. It was later presumed that he fell in action on that day.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £155 18s 9d on 29th November 1919.

 

Acting Captain William Rhys Lancelot Davis

Killed in Action 23rd April 1917

10th Battalion The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment)

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Age 21

S Davis and Sons Factory Memorial Scroll (now in Hinckley and District Museum; original in the Imperial War Museum)

1911 Census: He was visiting Mr and Mrs Barron in Spondon, Derby with his brother Arthur Lancelot Davis. He was at school.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France 0n 20th December 1915. His father’s address is given as Bank Wood, Duffield, Derbyshire.

From Officer Records: He was born 12th April 1896 at 6 Acres, Hinckley. He was the son of Arthur Lancelot and Agnes Anne Davis formerly Clarke. His residence at enlistment was given as Beech House, Spondon, Derby. His parents lived at Gleadethorpe, Cavendish Crescent North, The Park, Nottingham. He was educated at Bedford Grammar School from January 1909 to July 1913. He was a Private in Bedford Grammar School OTC. He enlisted on 2nd November 1914 as Second Lieutenant. His height was 5ft 11 inches. He went to France on December 19th 1915. He was wounded with shell fragments to the right cheek and right buttock on 14th February 1916, whilst with his men in International Trench, part of “The Bluff” feature, in the south of the Ypres Salient, close to Zwarteleen and Hill 60. He left the unit on February 1916. He embarked for Southampton from Boulogne 29th February 1916.

Medical Board at Osborne on the Isle of Wight, 7th March 1916

“A small fragment of a shell lodged in his right cheek over the angle of the jaw and another in the fold of the right buttock, both of which were removed. He was admitted on 1st march and the wounds are now healed. He was nervous and suffering from insomnia and nightmares; no tremors to speak of but he has now considerably improved”

He was granted sick leave from 8th March to 7th April.

Medical Board at Military Hospital, Carrington, Nottingham 17th April 1916, condition described as Traumatic Neurasthenia:

“This Officer was slightly wounded in the face and thigh in the International Trench of the Ypres Salient. The wounds were very superficial. He was sent to the Clearing Station at Poperinghe, where the pieces of shrapnel were removed, after which he was transferred to the Base Hospital at Etaples. He is suffering at present from debility and sleeplessness”

He was granted sick leave for 6 weeks.

Medical Board at Military Hospital, Carrington, Nottingham 29th May 1916, condition described as Traumatic Neurasthenia:

“He has improved, he is sleeping better but is still debilitated and very easily fatigued. His appetite is bad. His pulse is regular but weak”.

He was granted sick leave for 6 weeks.

Medical Board at Military Hospital, Carrington, Nottingham 4th July 1916, condition described as Traumatic Neurasthenia:

This Officer has very much improved, he is now sleeping well and the headaches have disappeared. His appetite is good, exercise does not now cause fatigue and he is now fit”.

He was passed fit to rejoin his unit.

HINCKLEY TIMES

The many friends in Hinckley and District of Mr. Lance Davis of Derby formerly of Hinckley, learned with deep regret of the death in action on April 23rd of his youngest son, Lieutenant William Rhys Lancelot Davis of the Sherwood Foresters. News of his terrible bereavement was conveyed to Mr. Davis by a war office telegram on Saturday night last.

The late Lieutenant Davis, who is stated to have been gallantly leading his men into action at the time he met his death, was a native of Hinckley being born in the town on April 12th 1896. He was educated at Temple Grove and Bedford Grammar School and volunteered for service at the outbreak of the ar. He received his commission in November 1914 and proceeding to France took part in the heavy fighting of the earlier part of the campaign, being wounded before Ypres in 1916. It will be recalled that while recovering from his wounds, Lieutenant Davis visited Messrs. H and S Davis, his uncles in Hinckley and for some days enjoyed the company of many of his old friends. He re-joined his regiment in August of last year and was killed 11 days after attaining his majority.

Much regret is felt in the town for the bereaved father, whose other sons are serving with the Colours.

DU RUVIGNY’S ROLL OF HONOUR

William Rhys Lancelot Davis, Captain 10th Service Battalion, The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment); 3rd and youngest son of Arthur Lancelot Davis of Derby and Hinckley, by his wife, Agnes Anne, daughter of Thomas Worthington Clarke, of Hinckley; educated Temple Grove, East Shen; Bedford Grammar School and at Neuchatel, Switzerland, where he was studying languages; was gazetted Second Lieutenant Sherwood Foresters 18th November 1914; promoted Lieutenant 8th July 1916 and Captain 3rd April 1917; served with the Expeditionary Force in France from November 1915; was wounded before Ypres in February 1916 and was killed in action 23rd April 1917, during an attack on the Germans beyond Monchy Le Preux. Buried near where he fell; unmarried.

Army Registers of Effects: A payment of £156 12s 6d was paid into his Father’s account in the Union of London and Smith’s Bank.

 

Bombardier William Edgar Dawson 149285

Died of Wounds 24th September 1917

D Battery 189th Brigade Royal Field Artillery

Bedford House Cemetery, Zillebeke, Belgium

Plot 1 Row D Grave 15

Age 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr and Mrs C Dawson, Hollycroft, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 34 Manor Street, Hinckley and was employed as a Butcher. He lived with his wife Harriet Dawson and one daughter Violet.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 3RD NOVEMBER 1917

Official news is to hand that Bombardier W Edgar Dawson of the Royal Field Artillery died from wounds received in action in France on September 24th. Aged 28 years, he was the son of Mr and Mrs C Dawson, of Hollycroft, Hinckley and he leaves a widow and three little girls.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £6 4s 3d on 20th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £6 10s on 9th December 1919.

 

 

Private Albert John Dell

Killed in Action 23rd April 1917

19th Battalion Manchester Regiment formerly 4654 Leicestershire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Bay 7

Born Northchurch, Herts Enlisted Hinckley Living Northchurch, Herts

St. Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living as a boarder with the Bedford family at 38 Gossoms End, Berkhamstead, Herts.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – June 1917

It is with feelings of personal regret that we hear of the death of Private Albert John Dell of the 19th Manchesters and formerly a member of the Rosary staff. He is reported to have been killed in action in France on April 23rd. No details are known as to the immediate cause of his death. All the source of information to hand so far is the stereotyped form from the authorities.

The deceased’s home was at Northchurch, Great Berkhamstead, in Hertfordshire and he came to Hinckley in January 1913. A member of the Church of England, he attended St. Mary’s Church for some time after his arrival here; but later he began to show leanings towards Catholicism and attended St. Peter’s Church. Yet it was not until he joined the army that he took the final step and was received into the Church by Father Arendzen at St. Mary’s, Grantham.

Of a bright and frank disposition, Private Dell won the regard of his many friends. He had a taste for serious literature and gave several lectures to the Catholic Men’s Society on the Carthaginian Wars. He was also a member of the Club and St. Peter’s Musical and Dramatic Society. He took the part of one of two savages in “Don Quixote”, the other being the late Private Edward O’Neil.

It is a melancholy fact that both have paid the price of their patriotism within nine months of each other.

Private Dell was much attached to his second brother, who died from wounds received at the Battle of the Aisne in 1914 and having a desire to take his brother’s place he enlisted in the 5th Leicesters during October 1915 which was about the time of the first anniversary. He received most of his training at Belton Park, near Grantham. Later he was billeted at Bulwell, Notts and then went to Richmond, arriving at Rouen, in France, last June. The following month he was slightly wounded in the heed, which necessitated him remaining in hospital at Le Treport for a short time; he had an attack of the “Trench Feet”. Whilst in France he was transferred from the Tigers to the Manchesters. He was in his 26th year.

Our heartfelt sympathy is hereby offered to his relatives at the second loss they have sustained in the war. A third and younger brother is at present with the forces in France.

A requiem Mass is being offered on behalf of the members of the Club and a similar act of charity is being done at the request of the dramatic society – RIP”

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £10 15s 5d was paid to his legatee Hilda M Mackey on 28th November 1917 and a war gratuity of £6 10s was paid to Hilda M Mason on 20th November 1919.

 

 

Private Charles Dewing 235069

Killed in Action 20th September 1917

17th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment)

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Ag 38

Born Norwich Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Fanny Dewing, 31 Chessher Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: His birth place is given as Norwich. The census gives his wife’s name as Fannie. At that point they have one daughter – May, aged 2 years. His occupation is given as Hosiery Trimmer.

Medal Index Card: This gives his first regimental number as 202967 and then later 235069. Victory Medal and the British War Medal.

Service Record

His address is given as 31 Chessher Street, Hinckley. His age is 36 and he is a hosiery trimmer at Sketchley Dyeworks. He attests for service on 11th December 1915 and is called up to the 4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment on 8th February 1917. His height is given as 5ft 5ins. He married Fanny Morley on 1st August 1905 at Holy Trinity Church, Hinckley. There are three siblings – May (8.5.1908), Norah (22.2.1918) and Annie (18.5.1915). He was entitled to the British War medal and the Victory Medal. His religion is given as Church of England. He transfers from the 4th Leicestershire Regiment to the 2/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. He departs from Folkestone on 15th May 1917 and disembarks at Calais on 17th May 1917. On the 14th June 1917, he was transferred to the 17th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derbys) Regiment. From 16th June 1917 he was attached to the 227th Divisional Company Royal Engineers and returns to his battalion on 7th August 1917. He is reported missing in action on 22nd September 1917 and his date of death is reverted to 20th September 1917. His wife is granted a pension of 27/7 a week for herself and three children from 7th June 1918.  He appears to have initially refused a vaccination at Louth on 28th February 1917 in preparation for Foreign Service. However, he appears to have relented this decision.

HINCKLEY TIMES 24th NOVEMBER 1917

Mrs Dewing, wife of Private C Dewing, of 31 Chessher Street, Hinckley ha recently received a notification from the War Office stating that her husband has been missing since 20th September last. Up to 8th February last, Private Dewing, who is 38 years of age, was employed at Sketchley Dyeworks as a trimmer. He went to Louth for his preliminary training. In May last he proceeded with the Leicesters to France and was transferred a few weeks after to the Notts and Derby Regiment. Letters were received about the time he was missing in September and since then Mrs Dewing has heard nothing more. Any information will be gratefully received by his wife.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £2 3s 11d was paid to his widow on 21st December 1918. A war gratuity of £3 was paid to his widow on 30th October 1919.

 

 

 

Private Arthur Diggle 30328

Killed in Action 16th August 1917

7th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers formerly 31296 Leicestershire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Born Bullwell, Nottinghamshire Enlisted Leicester Living in Hinckley

Census 1911: His address is given as 71 Rugby Road, Hinckley and his occupation as Rib Hosiery Hand. His wife, Mary Louisa Diggle is aged 23 and their only daughter at that time, Elizabeth is aged 10 weeks.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and the British War Medal.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £1 18s 4d was paid to his widow on 7th December 1918 and a war gratuity of £4 was paid to her on 1st January 1920.

 

Private Herbert Dixon 240268

Killed in Action 28th December 1917

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment attached D Company 170 Tunnelling Company Royal Engineers

Noeux -les-Mines Communal Cemetery, France

Plot 3 Row B Grave 15

Age 22

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Census 1911: His address is given as 86 Upper Bond Street, Hinckley and his occupation as a Boot Factory Apprentice. He lived with his parents Mr Edward Dixon and Mrs Mary Ann Dixon and had five brothers Charles (30), James (25), Charles (25), William (18) and George Arthur (11)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He arrived in France on 29th June 1915.

HINCKLEYTIMES 26TH JANUARY 1918

Private Herbert Dixon of the Leicestershire Regiment has been killed in action in France on 28th December 1917. Private Dixon was one of a party filling sandbags in the trenches when he was shot in the head by a sniper. He died instantaneously with no pain. He was aged 22 years. He was a member of Hinckley Territorials and had previously been gassed. He worked for Arguile, Grewcock and Ward, Boot Makers, Barwell.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £9 18s 1d was paid to his mother on 2ns April 1918 and a war gratuity of £15 10s was paid to his mother on 9th November 1919.

 

Private Joseph Dixon 26057

Killed in Action 20th April 1917

8th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Bays 3 and 4

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Brother of the above

Son of Mrs Mary Ann Dixon, 67 Litchfield Terrace, Coventry Road, Hinckley.

S Davis and Sons Factory Memorial Scroll (now in Hinckley and District Museum; original in the Imperial War Museum)

1911 Census: He was living with his wife and his occupation is recorded as Hosiery – Cotton Patent Machinist.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He attested on 10th December 1915. He was living with his wife, Mrs Mary Ann Dixon, nee Smart, at 67 Litchfield Terrace, Coventry Road and they had married on 31st July 1907. They had one daughter, Edith Florence, who was born on 11th May 1916. A later form for October 1919 in the record records that there are no children of the marriage – the death certificate of Edith Florence, aged 8 months, appears in the record. She died of acute bronchitis and cardiac failure. Joseph Dixon had 4 siblings – Arthur, Charles, James and Florence. His widow received a pension of 13/9 per week from 14th January 1918. He first went to France on 13th November 1916. He was posted to the 8th Battalion Lincolnshire on 14th November 1916. He had a period of leave in England before being wounded in action and then presumed killed after being missing.

HINCKLEY TIMES 16TH MARCH 1918

Mrs. M A Dixon of 67 Litchfield Terrace, Hinckley, has been informed that her husband, Private Joseph Dixon, of the Leicestershire Regiment April 20th 1917, is now concluded dead.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of 9/4d on 3rd May 1918 and a war gratuity of £3 on 30th October 1919.

 

 

Private William Dixon T/206943

Died of Wounds 25th May 1918

7th Battalion The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment) formerly 365862 Northumbrian Cyclist Battalion

St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France

Block O Plot 2 Grave 24

Age 25 Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley Living Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Son of Mr Edward and Mrs Mary Ann Dixon, 86 Upper Bond Street, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 86 Upper Bond Street and was a Runner On in a hosiery factory. He had 4 siblings - James, Charles, Herbert and George.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 1918

Private William Dixon of the Queen’s Royal West Surreys has died of wounds received in action on Saturday 25th May, 1918. The deceased was 25 years of age. Private Dixon was wounded in the thigh from which complications arose and he died in the 5th General Hospital in Rouen. He is the third son of Mr and Mrs Dixon of 106 Upper Bond Street, Hinckley to fall in the war and one of six brothers serving with the forces. Shortly before his death, he wrote to say that he had obtained a “Blighty” one. In civilian life he was employed by Messrs. S Brocklehurst, Hosiery Manufacturers, Bond Street, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £15 13s 11d on 10th September 1918 and a war gratuity of £9 on 10th December 1919.

 

Private John Henry Drage 4862

Died of Wounds 12th September 1916

1/5th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

Millencourt Communal Cemetery Extension, France

Row F Grave 49

Age 34

Born in Leicester Enlisted in Hinckley

Son of George and Sarah Ann Drage, 37 Clarence Road, Hinckley.

1911 Census: His occupation s given as a Nursery labourer. The address is 39 Clarence Road, Hinckley. He was single.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal

HINCKLEY TIMES 14TH OCTOBER 1916

It is officially announced that Private John Henry Drage of the Northumberland Fusiliers, son of Mrs Drage of 37 Clarence Road, Hinckley, died on September 12th from wounds received in action on September 10th. He was 34 years of age and was called up as a Derby recruit in May of last year. For 12 years previously he had worked at Messrs B Hurst and Son, Nurseries, Burbage. It is thought that he had not been at the front for many months.

Army Register of Effects: A war gratuity of £3 was posted but the name of the recipient is not given.

 

 

Gunner Tom Drage 77925

Died of Wounds 23rd September 1917

149th Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery

Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium

Age 27

Born in Burbage Enlisted in Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Husband of Mrs Lillian E Drage, 3 Wood Street, Hinckley

St Paul’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: His occupation is given a hosiery hand - top hand. The address as 39 Clarence Road.

                                                                   ,           

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He enlisted on the 10th May 1916. His address is given as 63 Duke Street, Hinckley. His wife was Lillian Elizabeth Drage nee Woodward and they were married on 3rd April 1915. They lived at 63 Duke Street and then the wife moved to 3 Wood Street, Hinckley.

Following enlistment Gunner Drage was posted to No 4 Depot Royal Garrison

Artillery at Great Yarmouth on 2nd June 1916.

The record shows one brother and one sister: Ernest Drage, 11 Chreyssa Avenue, Mount Dennis, West Toronto, Ontario, Canada and Ellen Drage at 39 Clarence Road, Hinckley. He has a nephew and niece in Canada, Ernest Drage and Annie Drage.

He embarked for France on 21st August 1916 and disembarked at Le Harve on 22nd August 1916.

He died from wounds of the abdomen and left thigh, from aerial bombardment on 22nd September 1917, at the 4th Casualty Clearing Station, on the following day. When his effects were sent to his widow, there was a ring missing. His widow wrote to the authorities asking for the ring which was decorated with a pattern of raised flowers.

HINCKLEY TIMES 13TH OCTOBER 1917

Mrs Drage of 3 Wood Street, Hinckley, has been notified that her husband Gunner Tom Drage of the Royal Garrison Artillery, died in the 4th Casualty Clearing Station in France on September 23rd from wounds in the abdomen and left thigh received the day previous, when his battery were at rest billets. The deceased was wounded by a bomb dropped by a German plane.

The deceased was 27 years of age and was formerly in the employ of Messrs. Jennings and Son of Queens Road. He is the second son of Mrs. Drage in Clarence Road to be lost in the war.

Army Register of Effects: the sum of £2 3s 2d was paid to his widow on 9th January 1918. A war gratuity of £5 10s was paid to his widow on 6th December 1919.

Private Ryston Edward Draper 240386

Killed in Action March 22nd 1918

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery.

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Unitarian Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his Uncle, Mr. John Draper, at 28 Canonbury Road, Islington, London. He was described as a school boy.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father, Arthur Draper, received a sum of £27 15s 12d on 2nd February 1920 which included a war gratuity of £20.

 

 

Private Lewis Dumbleton 39223

Killed in Action 21st March 1918

2/6th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Age 31

Born Middleton Cheney, Northants Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr George Dumbleton, Middleton Cheney, Banbury, Oxfordshire; Husband of Mrs. Betsy Dumbleton, 110 Upper Bond Street, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 53 Willington Street, Nuneaton with his sister and brother in law, Mr Alfred White and Mrs Susan White. His occupation was recorded as Coal Miner – Filler.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He attested on 10th December 1915 and was called up on 19th April 1917. He was living at 26 Lower Bond Street in 1915 and was employed as a carter. An address of 23 Trinity Lane is also given for his wife, in later surviving documents. He and his wife Betsy, nee Fielding, had a son Ernest Eric Dumbleton who was born on 10th June 1917 but who subsequently died. In 1920 his widow was living at 88 Factory Road, Hinckley. His religion is given as Church of England. From the depot at Glen Parva he was posted to the 3rd Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment at Wallsend. He arrived at the 12th Infantry Base Depot in Calais on 12th September 1917 and was posted to the 9th Battalion of the Regiment on 17th September 1917. On the 27th September 1917 he was transferred to the 2/6th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment. His wife received a pension of 13/9d per week from 18th November 1918.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £10 11s 11d on 28th July 1919 which included a war gratuity of £5.

 

Private Harry Eady 22829

Died of Wounds 7th January 1918

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Choques Military Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row N Grave 32

Born in Thrapstone, Northants Enlisted in Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Age 30

1911 Census   Living at 24 Lower Bond Street, Hinckley. His occupation is given as farm labourer. He is married and has one son, Arthur, age 1.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He enlisted on 7th November 1915. His address is given as Stretton Cottages, Wolvey Road, Hinckley. His age is 29. His occupation is given as a Waggoner. His wife Emma Eady, nee Osbourne, is his next of kin. They were married at Hinckley Register Office on 23rd January 1909. His children were: Arthur (27.1.1909), George (17.7.1911) and Florence Annie (29.10.13).

He joined the 10th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment on 19th November 1915 and was posted to the 8th Battalion on 31st March 1916.He embarked on 30th March 1916 and was assigned to the 8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment at Etaples. He proceeded to join the battalion in the field on 20th April 1916 and arrived in billets on 22nd April 1916.

On 15th July 1916 he was admitted to the 6th Field Ambulance with a gunshot wound to the right leg, received on 14th July 1916. He was moved to the 34th Casualty Clearing Station and onto the Australian Field Hospital from where he was evacuated to England on 17th July 1916.

On the 11th August 1916 he was admitted to the Kempstone Hospital in Eastbourne and 7 days later was discharged to convalescent camp at Stildon House Red Cross Auxiliary Hospital at East Grinstead. He had suffered severe shrapnel wounds to the right leg. He had tubes inserted into two wounds to promote healing in the centre of the wounds. On 16th August the tubes were reinserted. On 5th September 1916 he is described as healing slowly. On 15th October massage was begun but it has to be confined to the ankle and there were no passive movements. By 30th October it is reported that the massage is continuing and passive movements are possible. By 5th November 1916 the wounds were described as healed.

On 1st July 1917 he was posted to the 1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment and joined his new unit in the field on 15th July 1917. On the 7th January he was admitted to a field ambulance with a gunshot wound of the abdomen and then to the 1st Casualty Clearing Station. He died there of his wounds on 7th January 1917. His widow received a pension of 27shillings 7pence per week from 27th July 1917. When his effects were returned his widow was living at 26 Trinity Lane, Hinckley.

HINCKLEY TIMES 26TH JANUARY 1918

Private Harry Eady of the Leicestershire Regiment has died of wounds in France on January 7th, aged 30 year. Private Eady was badly wounded when a shell exploded near him on Sunday 6th January. He had been badly wounded previously and had spent six months in hospital. He as well known in the Hinckley area as a runner and had won many prizes locally. His home address was the Three Pots, Hinckley. He was employed by Lieutenant –Colonel Atkins as a Waggoner.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £8 16s 6d was paid to his widow on 8th April 1918. A war gratuity of £9 10s was paid to his widow on 15th December 1919.

 

Private John William Ellis TK/6/53755

Died 28th October 1918

53rd Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment)

Hinckley Cemetery

Section 11 Grave 282

Born in Hinckley Enlisted in Leicester Living in Hinckley

Age 18

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial

1911 Census: He was a scholar. The address is not given. He had three siblings – Alice, Edwin and Gordon.

Army Register of Effects: He died in the military hospital in Clipstone Camp. The sum of £2 9s 10d was paid to his father Thomas on 17th March 1919.

 

Rifleman George Henry Evans B/203354

Killed in Action 18th September 1916

11th Battalion Kings Royal Rifle Corps

Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, Longueval, France

Plot 23 Row A Grave 3

Age 20

Born Hinckley Enlisted Worcester Living Worcester

Brother of Mr. Alfred Evans, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living at 12 Alma Street, Barbourne, Worcester with his parents Mr Alfred Evans and Mrs Ellen Evans. He was employed as a China Gilder.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal

style='font-family:"Times New Roman",serif'>HINCKLEY TIMES 11TH NOVEMBER 1916

Rifleman George Evans of the Kings Royal Rifle Corps was killed in action on the Somme on September 18th. He was seriously wounded and died almost immediately. He lived at 123 Castle Street, Hinckley. He enlisted in November 1815, aged 20 years. He went to France in April 1916.

Army Registers of Effects: Payments were made to his Father of £2 8s on 3rd April 1917 and to his Aunt, Ellen Evans – 16/- on 14th May 1917. She also received a war gratuity of £3 on 1st July 1919.

 

Private Samuel Charles Evans 18715

Died of Wounds 18th April 1916

2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Amara War Cemetery, Iraq

Plot 6 Row G Grave 2

Age 33

Born Burton upon Trent Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs. Sarah Jane Evans, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He lived at Blackbrook, Anslow, Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire with his Father, Mr John Evans and his Mother, Mrs Mary Evans. He had 2 siblings – William and Joseph.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 3RD JUNE 1916

Private S C Evans, a Hinckley soldier belonging to the 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment died in a hospital in Mesopotamia from wounds received whilst in action. He was the son of Mr J Evans of Burton Upon Trent and up to the time of his enlistment he resided in Hinckley. He was 33 years of age and leaves a widow and three children.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £4 2s 11d on 8th December 1916 and a war gratuity of £ on 10th November 1918.

 

Private Charles Sidney Everton 1317

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Died 25th June 1918 at the Leicestershire and Rutland Asylum, Narborough, Leics.

Age 23

Cause of death: Pulmonary Tubercle. His occupation at the time of his death was Brickyard Labourer.

He was living at 2 Cox’s Abbey, Castle Street, Hinckley and his mother Mrs Charlotte Everton was living at 3 Cox’s Abbey, Castle Street, Hinckley.

St. Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his Mother and was employed as a Seamless Hosiery Hand. He had 2 siblings – William and Samuel.

Service Record: He had enlisted on 18th March 1912 with the 1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. He was discharged at Dunstable, on 3rd October 1914, as being medically unfit – two months after mobilisation.

His name was originally missed off the Hinckley War Memorial but was added in October 2005.

 

Private Albert Fagg 18806

Killed in Action 5th March 1918

6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Ephey Wood Farm Cemetery, France

Plot 3 Row H Grave 8

Born London Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living in Ratby and was described as a Laundry Boy and Part Time Scholar.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal

Army Registers of Effects: His sister, Mrs. Ethel Watts, received a payment of £6 2s 11d on 29th May 1918 and a war gratuity of 13 on 14th November 1919.

His name was originally missed off the Hinckley War Memorial but was added in October 2005.

 

 

 

Private Ernest Fairbrother 40241

Died of Wounds 2nd October 1917

9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium

Plot 20 Row F Grave 20A

Age 20

Born Luton Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs Edith Fairbrother, Chapel Yard, Castle Street, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: he was living with his mother in Chapel Yard and was employed as a Puller On in the Hosiery Trade. He had 5 siblings – Elsie, Wilfred, Stanley, Frederick and Sidney.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 28th February 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 20TH OCTOBER 1917

Mrs. Fairbrother of Chapel Yard, Hinckley, has been notified that her son Private E Fairbrother of the 9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment died at No 2 Casualty Clearing Station at 5.30pm on October 2nd from a wound to his neck and left arm. Private Fairbrother mobilised with the Hinckley Territorials at the outbreak of the war. He went over to France in February 1915 and was badly wounded at Ypres. He returned to France in April 1916 and was killed only ten days after spending leave in Hinckley. He would have been 21 years of age next Sunday. He worked at Moore Eady Murcott Goode.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £2 5s 7d on 10th April 1918 and a war gratuity of £14 on 17th November 1919.

 

Private Arthur Farmer 44429

Killed in Action 24th September 1918

11th Battalion Essex Regiment formerly 101342 The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment)

Trefcon British Cemetery, Caulaincourt, France

Row C Grave 77

Age 18

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Son of Mrs Ellen Farmer, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Farmer, Occupation Road, Hinckley.

S Davis and Sons Factory Memorial Scroll (now in Hinckley and District Museum; original in the Imperial War Museum)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents, Mr Arthur Farmer and Mrs Ellen Farmer, at 9 Occupation Road, Hinckley. He had 3 siblings – Ann, James and George

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 2ND NOVEMBER 1918

The late Private A Farmer of the Essex regiment was killed in France on September 26th. He was the son of Mr and Mrs Farmer and leaves a widow in Occupation Road, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £5 18s 7d on 18th March 1919 and a war gratuity of £3 on 4th December 1919.

 

Private George Farmer 34719

Killed in Action 20th September 1917

10th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

Hooge Crater Cemetery, Zillebeke, Belgium

Plot 19 Row G Grave 7

Enlisted Hinckley

Brother of the above

1911 Census: He was living at 9 Occupation Road, Hinckley with his parents, Mr Arthur Farmer and Mrs Ellen Farmer. He was employed as a Printer’s Boy and had 3 siblings – Ann, James and Arthur.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £2 9s 3d on 12th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £6 on 12th November 1919.

 

Private Albert Arthur Faulks 48703

Died 9th December 1916

13th Battalion Kings (Liverpool) Regiment formerly 47038 The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment)

Etaples Military Cemetery, Etaples, France

Plot 20 Row F Grave 9

Age 32

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley Living Hinckley

Son of Mr and Mrs W Faulkes, Factory Road, Hinckley. Husband of Mrs Ellen Faulkes.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 23RD DECEMBER 1916

Private Albert Faulkes 48703 of the 13th Kings Regiment, transferred from the Sherwood Foresters, has died in the 7th Canadian Hospital in France on 9th December, from tetanus, following Trench Feet. He is married with two children. Thirty two years of age, he is the son of Mr and Mrs Faulkes, factory Road, Hinckley. He enlisted on 19th may 1915 and had been at the Front for 3 months. He worked at the Manchester Hosiery, as a webber. He was a member of Hinckley Liberal Club.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £2 9s 3d on 3rd May 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 29th October 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal William J Faulkner 11430

Died of Wounds 21st November 1916

11th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, France

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Age 20

Born Hinckley Enlisted Nuneaton Living Nuneaton

Son of Mr. Joseph Faulkner and Mrs May Faulkner, 6 Albert Road, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 31st July 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 9TH DECEMBER 1916

Lance-Corporal William Faulkner of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment has died in France on November 18th. He is the son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Faulkner of 6 Albert Road, Hinckley.

He enlisted in November 1914, aged 20 years. He was wounded at the battle of Loos in September 1915 but went out again at Christmas. He was injured by the accidental explosion of a bomb. He worked at the India and China Tea Company, Castle Street, Hinckley and then at Liptons, Nuneaton. He attended the Congregational Church where he was a Sunday School teacher.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of 11s 9 d on 24th February 1917 and a war gratuity of £7 on 20th September 1919.

 

 

Private Percy Radford Fish 1302

Died of Wounds 14th August 1916 Trench Mortar wound to left shoulder blade

D Company 1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Mount Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport, France

Age 212

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr and Mrs N Fish, 57 Coventry Road, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents Mr Nehemiah Fish and Mrs Nellie Fish at 57 Coventry Road, Hinckley. He was employed as a painter. He had 3 siblings – William, Annie and Sidney.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 28th February 1915.

PRO – MH106- 2030 His medical record gives two different times for the time of death – 11.30pm and 12 midnight.

HINCKLEY TIMES 26TH AUGUST 1916

Private Percy Fish of the Hinckley Territorials, son of Mr and Mrs N Fish of 57 Coventry Road, Hinckley, has died in the 2nd Canadian Hospital at Le Treport from wounds received in action on his 21st Birthday – July 1st.

The deceased formerly worked as a painter for Mr. J Abbott of the Borough. He was prominently connected with the local order of Good Templars and was a valued member of the Primitive Methodist Church. At the Good Templars service at this place of worship on Sunday night, reference was made to his death and to the good work accomplished in connection with the cause. Writing to the bereaved parents, Sgt T Heward of the Hinckley Territorials says that the deceased was held in respect by all who knew him. In another letter the Rev E Graham (Chaplain) states that Fish died about 11.30pm on the evening of August 14th. When the Chaplain was with him earlier in the evening Fish was not suffering as he had been when his parents saw him on the occasion of their visit to the hospital. The previous night he had told them that he was willing to go, since it must be and that he was desirous that it be soon. “He went as a Christian soldier at the call of the Captain of the great army above. May God Bless you and in his mercy bring you at last to the same home”.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £11 10s 8d on 7th December 1916 and a further payment of £4 14s on 6th February 1917. He received a war gratuity of £8 10s on 23rd September 1919.

 

Private Arthur Flude 23999

Killed in Action 17th October 1916

11th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Guards Cemetery, Les Boeufs, France

Plot 4 Row O Grave 8

Age 21

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr. Soloman Flude and Mrs Ellen Flude, London Road, Hinckley. Husband of Mrs Susan May Flude.

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 65 Thorneycroft Road and was a tailor’s apprentice. He had 7 siblings – Emma, Frank, Soloman Jnr, Florence, Harry, May and Mark.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal

HINCKLEY TIMES 28TH OCTOBER 1916

Private A Flude, of 13 Holliers Walk, Hinckley, of the Leicestershire Regiment has been killed in Germany by a shell. He was married. He met his death doing his duty carrying wounded under fire. He was 21 years of age. He worked for his Father, Mr Soloman Flude, Tailor, London Road, Hinckley. He was a Sunday School teacher at Hinckley Primitive Methodist Church.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £2 13s 6d on 14th March 1919 and a war gratuity of £3 on 18th December 1919.

 

Private Frederick James Flude 18420

Died of Wounds 18th October 1917

8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium

Plot 21 Row E Grave 11

Age 25

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Son of Mrs Mary A Foster, 23 Derby Road, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 12th October 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 10TH NOVEMBER 1917

Mrs Foster of 23 Derby Road, Hinckley, has been notified that her son Private Frederick Flude of the Leicesters died in the 3rd Casualty Clearing Station in France on October 17th from wounds received in action. Private Flude was 25 years of age.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of 14s on 7th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £11 on 17th November 1919.

 

Private George Fielding Follows 30328

Killed in Action 1st October 1917

9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Panels 50 and 51

Age 25

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs Follows, Hinckley. Husband of Mrs Ada May Follows, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of 10s 11d on 11th January 1919 and a war gratuity of £6 9s 1d on 8th December 1919.

 

 

Company Sergeant Major James William Forman

7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Pozieres Memorial to the Missing, France

Panels 29 and 30

Age 42

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr James Forman and Mrs Ellen Forman, 42 Queens Road, Hinckley

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Seamless Hosiery mechanic. He had 4 siblings – Ada, Horace, Ellen and Mary.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and Territorial Force War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects:  His Father received a payment of £52 11s on 24th October 1919 that included a war gratuity of £28.

Private James Frith 15720

Died of Wounds 15th July 1917

10th (Service) Battalion The York and Lancaster Regiment

Hazebrouck Communal Cemetery, France

Plot 3 Row D Grave 19

Age 27

Born Hinckley Enlisted Doncaster

Son of Mr. James Frith, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Esther Sophia Frith, 3 Barrack Yard, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 3 Chapel Yard, Coton Road, Nuneaton. He was employed as a Miner (Flammer). They had one son – James

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 10th September 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £7 1s 7d and a war gratuity of £13 7d on 9th December 1919.

 

Private Albert Samuel Frost 35704

Killed in Action 2nd October 1917

9th Battalion Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry formerly 149594 Royal Field Artillery

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Age 33

Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs Mary Ann Wignall, 1 Court Road, Sanvey Gate, Leicester; Husband of Eliza Ann Frost, 2 Warren’s Yard, Rugby Road, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 38 Trinity Lane, Hinckley and was employed as a Dyer’s Labourer in the Hosiery trade.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £2 4s 9d on 15th February 1919 and a war gratuity of £5 10s on 13 November 1919.

 

Private Alfred Garner 241556

Killed in Action 28th April 1917

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Bully-Grenay Communal Cemetery, British Extension

Plot 1 Row F Grave 13

Age 21

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Robert Garner and Mrs Emma Garner, Curzon Terrace, Factory Road, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 132 Factory Road and was employed as a Shoe Hand Tacker. He had 6 siblings – Edith, John, Lizzie, Harold, Arthur and Emma.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914- 1915 Star. He first went to France on 11th December 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 9TH MAY 1917

Private Alfred Garner of the Leicestershire Regiment has been shot dead by a sniper on 28th April 1917. Private Garner and another soldier were sent to the front line with a message when he was shot through the back by a sniper. The deceased was 21 years of age and worked at Clarke War & Co. The parents of the deceased live at Curzon Terrace, Factory Road.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £2 7s 8d ion 26th June 1917. He received a second payment of 3/8d on 12th July 1917. He also received a war gratuity of £9 on 24th November 1919.

 

 

 

Private John Seller Garner 326093

Died 10th May 1918

8th Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars (Worcestershire Yeomanry)

Hinckley Cemetery

Section 7 Grave 84

Enlisted in Birmingham Living in Hinckley

Age 31

Son of Mr William and Mrs Ann Garner, 25 Derby Road, Hinckley.

1911 Census: His address is given as 25 Derby Road, Hinckley. He was occupied as a Gun Metal worker. His birthplace was Barwell. He has three siblings – Mary, Charles and Annie.

HINCKLEY TIMES 18TH   MAY 1918

Mrs Garner of 25 Derby Road, Hinckley, was notified that her son, Private John Seller Garner of the Queens Own Worcestershire Hussars, has died in hospital in Dublin from pneumonia, aged 31 years. He had been ill for two days.

Private Garner had been in his regiment for about 18 months and had served in the army for two years, the last six months in Ireland. Prior to enlisting he was employed by the Birmingham Corporation as a car driver. Before that he worked for S Davis & Son, New Buildings, Hinckley. He was a member of Hinckley Liberal Club.

His body was brought from Dublin for internment in Hinckley cemetery. There was no firing party but the coffin was draped with the Union Jack.

Army Register of Effects: His father William received two sums of £3 11s 9d and £2 on 22nd October 1918 and 7th January 1919. A war gratuity of £6 10s was paid on 1st December 1919.

 

Private William H Garner 25095

Killed in Action 19th November 1917

138th Company Machine Gun Corps formerly 1918 Leicestershire Regiment

Philosophe British Cemetery, France

Plot 3 Row A Grave 12

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs P Elizabeth Garner, Stockingford, Nuneaton.

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 28th February 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 1ST DECEMBER 1917

Private Garner 25095, Machine Gun Company was killed in action on November 19th 1917.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £11 6s 10d on 2nd April 1918. She also received a war gratuity of £15 on 5th December 1919.

 

Private P Ernest Garratt 241606

Killed in Action 26th April 1917

8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Avesnes-les-Comte Communal Cemetery Extension, France

Plot 4 Row C Grave 14

Age 38

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs Mary Jane Garratt and the late Mr. Joseph Garratt, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 49 Derby Road, Hinckley with his mother and 1 sibling – Percy. He was employed as a clicker inn the boot trade.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 19TH MAY 1917

Private P Ernest Garratt of the Leicestershire Regiment has died of wounds in France on April 26th at the age of 38 years. His home is at 49 Derby Road, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £1 4s 3d on 26th June 1917 and a war gratuity of £8 10s on 27th December 1919. The record stats that he died at the 37th Casualty Clearing Station.

 

 

Private William George Gee 40511

Killed in Action 5th April 1918

6th Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment formerly 371016 Leicestershire Regiment

Pozieres Memorial to the Missing, France

Age 42

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs Florrie Ellen Gee, Holliers Walk, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Memorial.

1911 Census – He was living at 29 Holliers Walk with his wife and 3 children – Ashley, Kathleen and George. He was employed as an insurance agent.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 21ST JUNE 1918

Mrs Gee of 29 Holliers Walk, Hinckley would be glad for any information concerning her husband Private W Gee (40511) of the Northants Regiment. Private Gee came home on leave in March and returning to France sent a card dated April 1st, since which date nothing has been heard of him. Before joining up he was an assurance agent employed by the Prudential Co.

Army Registers of Effects:  His wife received a payment of £16 7s 4d on 31st January 1920.

 

 

Private Percy Gilbert 16194

Died of Wounds 11th October 1917

B Company 6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Godewaersvelde British Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row 4 Grave 32

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Age 24

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Son of Mr. Alfred Gilbert and Mrs Lizzie Gilbert, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 8 The Borough, Hinckley and was employed as a Shop Assistant Grocery Trade. He had 9 siblings – Lance, Clive, Thomas, Emma, Alfred, Elsie, Maud, Elizabeth and Florrie.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France 0n 29th July 1915.

Service Record: He attested on 30th November 1914 and his occupation is recorded as Grocer. He was 5ft 11 inches. He wore false dentures. He was posted to the Leicestershire Regiment on 8th December 1914 and arrived in France on 29th July 1915. From 16th November to 19th November 1916 he was admitted to hospital with a sprained right leg. He was admitted again on 9th December 1916 with a sprained right thumb. On 16th July 1917 he was admitted to the 64th WL Field Ambulance with Pyrexia (High Fever). He was hospitalised for 8 days. He was granted leave from 12th August to 22nd August 1917.

HINCKLEY TIMES 27TH OCTOBER 1917

It is announced that Private Gilbert of the 6th Battalion, B Company, the Leicestershire Regiment, has died of wounds in France, on October 11th. Private Gilbert was brought to the 41st Casualty Clearing Station, badly wounded and died at 6.15pm aged 24 years. He had been in France for two and a half years and had been wounded twice before. He joined the army in 1914. He worked for H Prosser, Grocer, the Borough, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £4 10s 4d on 7th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £13 10s on 10th November 1919.

 

Private Percy Collins Gilder G/40076

Killed in Action 26th September 1916

12th Battalion Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment)

Thiepval Memorial, France

Pier 12 Face D Pier 13 Face A

Age 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Walter Gilder and Mrs Susannah Gilder, Market Place, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents. He was employed as a Hosier and Outfitters Shop Assistant and had 4 siblings – Bernard, George, Alice and Annie.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He enlisted on 19th February 1915 in the Royal Fusiliers and landed in France on 18th August 1916 and transferred to the 12th Battalion Middlesex Regiment on 31st August 1916. He joined the battalion in the field on 1st September 1916. He stood 5ft 11inches.

HINCKLEY TIMES 18TH NOVEMBER 1916

Private Percy Gilder, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Gilder, Market Place, Hinckley has been killed in action with the Middlesex regiment on September 26th, 1916. He was a member of the firm of Messrs W Gilder & Sons, Outfitters, Market Place. He enlisted in the Bankers Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers early this year and was then transferred to the Middlesex Regiment when he arrived in France. He was reported missing some weeks ago. His Officers feared from the first that it was unlikely that he had been taken prisoner as the Germans had been driven back at the time.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £3 4s 7d on 6th June 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 27th November 1919.

 

 

 

Private Fred Ginns 15352

Died of Wounds 15th September 1917

26th Labour Corps formerly 2884 Labour Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment and formerly 31495 Leicestershire Regiment

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium

Plot 19 Row B Grave 13

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Age 32

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs Florence Ginns, 32 Lower Bond Street, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

St. Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: His address is given as 16 Walmer Villas, Spa Lane, Hinckley. He was single and a hosiery counter man. He had 7 siblings – Mary, William, Mary Ellen, Mary Agnes, Marie Florence, Joseph and Mary Catherine.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – October 1917

It is with regret that we add the name of Private Frederick Ginns to the foregoing list, which now totals twenty –two names. The deceased belonged to the 26th Labour Company and was called up in his group on June 30th 1916, passing over to France within a fortnight after. He was in his 3nd year and leaves a wife and baby daughter. The news of his death was first received from the Catholic Chaplain, the Rev P J Kilduff CF, to the 17th Casualty Clearing Station, France and was officially confirmed later. Father Kilduff wrote to say that Private Ginns was admitted to the hospital on Saturday afternoon, September 15th, suffering from wounds in the left arm and the abdomen and he died at 9.30pm, having been fortified with the last Sacraments. The following day, Sunday, he was interred in the local military cemetery, according to the rites of the church. Father Kilduff, in expressing his sympathy, stated that it was his intention to say a Mass in the ensuing week for the repose of the soul of the deceased soldier. His relatives, to whom we offer our condolences, wish to express through our columns their appreciation of the sympathy they have received from their many friends – RIP.

HINCKLEY TIMES 29TH SEPTEMBER 1917

It is announced that Private Fred Ginns of the Labour Company has died of wounds in France. He was attached to the Labour Corps. Private Ginns joined the army on 30th June 1916 and served in France for the past 14 months. He was admitted to hospital on the afternoon of September 15th with a wound to his left arm and abdomen and died the same day at 9.30pm in the 17th Casualty Clearing Station, aged 32 years. His wife and child reside at 32 Lower Bond Street. He was formerly employed by Bedford Bros, Hosiery Manufacturers, John Street, Hinckley.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £4 18s 11d was paid to his widow on 3rd January 1918. A war gratuity of £4 10s was paid to the widow 5th October 1919.

 

Private John William Gimson 71774

Died of Wounds 11th June 1917

11th Battalion The Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment)

Mendinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium

Plot 1 Row E Grave 3

Age 37

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester

Son of Mr John and Mrs Ada Gimson, 7 Blockley’s Yard, Hinckley. Husband of Mrs Ada Gimson, Leicester.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He lived at 18 Ruding Street, Leicester and was employed as a Hosiery Scourer. He had 2 siblings – Amelia and George.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES JULY 1917

It is officially announced that Private William Gimson of the Leicestershire Regiment has died of wounds on 11th June in France, aged 37 years. Private Gimson received gunshot wounds on the previous day and died in a Casualty Clearing Station. The son of Mr and Mrs C Gimson of 7 Blockley’s Yard, Regent Street, Hinckley. He was married and lived and worked in Leicester before joining the army.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £3 5s 9d on 24th September 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 29th October 1919.

 

Private John Goadby 9460

Killed in Action 22nd September 1914

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Vailly British Cemetery, France

Plot 2 Row E Grave 13

Age 20

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Son of Mr James Goadby, 6 Oak Yard, Bond Street, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his father and was employed as a Boot hand – Tacker. He had 1 sibling – Arthur.

Medal Index Card: Victory War Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star. He first went to France on 9th September 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES 24TH OCTOBER 1914   

Information was received on Saturday that Private John Goadby, 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, was killed on September 22nd. Private Goadby was the son of Mr J Goadby of Bond Street, Hinckley. He joined the Warwickshire Regiment some three years ago and subsequently transferred to the Leicestershire Regiment. Until the war broke out he was stationed in Ireland. Of course, nothing is known officially as to how Goadby met his death but it has been stated by one of his comrades, a Hinckley man who is in hospital suffering from wounds in action, that the unfortunate’s head was blown off by a shell. Goadby was 20 years of age.

HINCKLEY TIMES 31ST OCTOBER 1914

Writing from the East Lancashire Red Cross Hospital at Worsley Hall, private T De Mott of the 1st battalion Leicestershire Regiment explains that it was on the 22nd of September that Goadby got killed and adds: “I was wounded with the same shell. I did my best for the poor chap. As the shell burst I was thrown two yards and I heard Goadby shout: “Oh, De Mott, I am hit”. I replied: “So am I”.

When I had finished bandaging myself up I went to bandaging Goadby but my pal was breathing his last. His last words were; “You have been a good pal to me, so goodbye!” and I shook hands with him. I then tried to get into my trench but found that I could not stand. I watched them dig his grave and bury him”. Private Goadby’s last wish was that the Kaiser would be defeated.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £3 12s 4d on 26th January 1915 and a war gratuity of £5 on 2nd June 1919.

 

 

Lance-Corporal Stanley Philip Good 10218

Died of Wounds 15th August 1915

6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Locre Churchyard, Belgium

Plot 2 Row A Grave 16

Age 19

Born Alderton, Suffolk Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Phillip Good and Mrs Edith Good, Coventry Road, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at Shade Cottage, Wigston Parva, Leicestershire. He had 8 siblings – Percival, Lorna, Constance, Robert, Jack, Octavia, Rhona and Henry.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 29th July 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £2 18s 9d on 8th November 1915 and a war gratuity of £3 on 21st August 1918. The record shows that he did in the 86th Field Ambulance.

 

 

 

Sapper Berty George Goode 164879

Died of Wounds 18th April 1917

4th Field Squadron Royal Engineers

Grevilliers British Cemetery

Age 26

Born Market Bosworth Enlisted Coalville

Husband of Harriet A Thompson (formerly Goode), Osbaston Fields, nr Nuneaton

1911 Census: His address is given as the Railway Hotel, Hinckley. His occupation is as a cabinet maker and he has two siblings –Sarah and Maggie.

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – May 1917

We regret to announce that Mr. Bert Goode, son of Mr Goode of the Railway Hotel and grandson of Mr. Jonathan Goode, has died from wounds received in action. He had married Miss Barbara Trivett of Market Bosworth, niece of Father Leo Moore.

HINCKLEY TIMES

Very many of our readers in Hinckley and Market Bosworth district will learn with regret that Mr. Berty Goode, a mounted sapper in the Royal Engineers, who before joining up was the landlord of the Red Lion Hotel, Market Bosworth, has died of wounds received in action on 19th April.

The deceased who was 26 years of age, was the only son of Mr and Mrs William Goode, of the Railway Hotel, Hinckley. He was called up in May of last year and after receiving training at Chatham and Aldershot, proceeded to France in February of this year.

According to a telegram received by the widow from the Colonel in command, Sapper Goode died in hospital on Wednesday of last week from the effects of his wounds, a portion of shell piercing his abdomen.

Some days previously, Mrs Goode had received a letter from Rev E C Beauchamp, Chaplain of the clearing station, to the effect that the deceased was wounded in the groin. “The wound”, he explained “was naturally serious but he seems to be making good progress and is quietly cheerful”. A Chum also wrote to Mrs Goode that he, the deceased, “was doing a soldier’s duty when he got hit and the people at home ought to be proud of him”.

From a subsequent letter received from the Chaplain, it seems that Goode’s condition was much worse on Tuesday 17th and that death took place at midday the following day.

The deceased was well disposed and generally a well-liked young man. He was well known throughout Leicestershire as having assisted his father in the catering business at the County Cricket Ground, at the Leicestershire Agricultural Show and at other important gatherings of the general public. As a boy he was an enthusiastic chorister at Hinckley Parish Church under Mr. John Cooper, while as a young man he proved himself a useful member of Hinckley Rugby Club and made a wide circle of friends by whom his death will be much regretted”.

Army Register of Effects: He died in the 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Station, France. A sum of £3 12s 2d was paid to his widow Harriet A Goode on 19th January 1918. A war gratuity of £3 was paid to Harriet A Thompson on 19th March 1920.

 

 

Private John Goode 368

Killed in Action 7th April 1915

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Lindenhoek Chalet Military Cemetery, Kemmel, Belgium

Plot 2 Row H Grave 7

Born in Hinckley Enlisted in Hinckley

Age 33

Brother of Mr Thomas S Goode, Hinckley

St Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: His address is given as Castle Street and his occupation as a boot and shoe finisher.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 27th February 1915.

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine May 1915

It was with regret that the news was received of the death of Private John Goode of the Hinckley Territorials, 5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, while in the trenches during the early part of last month. He is the first member of our congregation (besides being the first Hinckley Territorial) to lose his life in the terrible conflict. According to an account from one of his comrades (among whom his was highly popular) he was shot at 5pm on April 7th and died an hour and a half later without regaining consciousness; and at 10 o’clock the same night he was buried in a place called “Pack Horse Farm”. One of the best known of local Territorials, Private Goode had been a member of the Hinckley Company for the last twelve years, which length of service secured for him a long service medal. He was a capital shot and was invariably amongst the prize winners in the annual competitions. He was thirty three years of age.

By desire of the members of the Club, a Requiem Mass was said for him on Monday the 19th; and another is being offered for the same intention at the request of the Catholic Men’s Society. RIP.

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – June 1915

To perpetuate the memory of the late Private J Goode, a framed portrait, suitably inscribed, has been placed in the new school. Conflicting reports are also to hand regarding the manner in which he received his death wound. One comrade, now in Hinckley, asserts that it was caused by a sniper’s bullet; others say it happened amidst heavy firing. The incident happened in the commune of Wulverghem, France – RIP.

Extract from the diary of Lance-Sergeant Cyril Brown

“On 7th April we had our first casualty. I was on guard with 6 men in the dugout and at two o’clock I posted poor old Johnny Goode and a few minutes later he was shot in the head and the poor chap died as I was binding him up”

HINCKLEY TIMES 17th APRIL 1915

The first Hinckley Territorial to be killed in action is Private John Goode, who on Wednesday of last week was shot through the jaw whilst in the trenches. He died and hour and a half later without regaining consciousness.

Private Goode was one of the best known Territorials having been a member of the Hinckley Company for the last 12 years, which length of service gained for him the long service medal. He was a capital shot and was invariably amongst the prize-winners in the annual competition.

Thirty Three years of age he had for the last 20 years worked at the Boot and Shoe factory of Mr Andrew Payne in Wood Street. His death comes as a great shock to the other members of the company with whom he was highly popular.

Army Register of Effects: A sum of £3 4s 3d was paid to his brother Thomas on 19th July 1915 and a war gratuity of £3 was paid to the same brother on 8th September 1919.

 

Corporal Lance Horace Goode 22719

Died of Wounds 4th May 1918

6th Battalion Kings Own Scottish Borderers

Courtrai (St. Jean) Communal Cemetery, Belgium

Row C Grave 25

Age 21

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Charles Goode and Mrs Eliza Goode, 27 Druid Street, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: he was living with his parents at 27 Druid Street and was employed as a Hosiery Warehouse Apprentice. He had 3 siblings – Eva, William and Walter.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £17 1s 11d on 5th June 1919 which included a war gratuity of £14. The record states that he died in a field Ambulance at Kortrijk.

 

Lance-Sergeant Walter Goode 29827

Killed in Action 23rs November 1917

13th Battalion Alexandra Princes of Wales Own (Yorkshire) Regiment

Cambrai Memorial, France

Panel 5

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Son of Mr. Charles Goode.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £8 12s 10d on 11th December 1918 and a war gratuity of £9 10s on 30th November 1919.

 

Second Lieutenant Thomas Lord Goode

Killed in Action 15th June 1918

5th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Maynaboschi British Cemetery, Italy

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Age 23

Son of Mr. Ernest Goode and Mrs Emma Goode, 109 Queens Road, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and is escribed as a scholar. He had 1 sibling – John.

Officer Records: He was born 30th December 1894.

He was the son of Edward Ernest Goode and Mrs Emma Goode, nee Musson, of 109 Queens Road, Hinckley. His Father was a manager in a Hosiery Factory. He was educated at Hinckley Grammar School. He was an articled Clerk to a Chartered Accountant. He enlisted on 20th December 1915 as 6505 Private in the 3rd Company, 3rd Battalion Honourable Artillery Company. He stood 5feet 7 inches. At the time of enlistment he lived at 22 High Street, Erdington, Birmingham. He was discharged to Commission on 27th March 1917. He was Second Lieutenant C Company 1/5th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment 143rd Brigade 48th Division

He was granted leave from 8th September 1917 to 18th September 1917.

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Spring Term 1913

Thomas Lord Goode was School Prefect, Secretary to the School Debating Society and Editor of the School Magazine.

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Autumn 1913

He was awarded the Hugh Atkins School Prize

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Spring Term 1918

“From Second Lieutenant T L Goode, 1/5th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Italian Expeditionary Force to Mrs Coxhead…..

I wish to thank you so much for the cigarettes sent to me by the Old Girls Association. You will see from my address that since I was on leave I have left France and am now in the “land of ice-cream” though if it were called the land of ice it would be a better description. If there is one thing difficult to obtain here it is a cigarette, so you will understand how I shall appreciate these you have sent. At present I have not decided whether I prefer France or Italy, but on the whole I think we are better off here than if we had still been in France. The chief disadvantage is that leave will be slow and it will be some time before I get home again. On the other hand it is a most interesting country. The larger towns are very imposing and the country quaint. I have had most interesting trips up to the mountains, where the scenery is glorious. The people themselves treat us very well indeed but the language difficulty is one to be reckoned with. Soon after we came here I had occasion to go to one of the cities to the bank there, a distance of about 15 miles. Practically the only Italian words I knew were the name of the town where I was going and the word for bank. When I arrived at the town I went to the nearest Gendarme and said “Banca”. A crowd gathered and I found someone who spoke French, so then my difficulties were considerably lessened. Since them my knowledge of Italians words has increased a little but it is very amusing for example to buy food for the Mess. We are now being allowed “Italian Leave”, so I hope I get the opportunity to see some better parts of the country. If all goes well in the future as it has done since we came here, no one can grumble. As the men say, it is a “bon” war just at present.

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Summer Term 1918

Thomas Lord Good (1907 – 1913), born at Hinckley, December 30th 1894, joined the HAC (Infantry Section) in December 1915; trained at Blackheath, Roehampton and Richmond, after attending a Cadet School at Clifton, Bristol, he obtained his commission (March 1917) as Second Lieutenant and was attached to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment; was sent to France in April and afterwards trained in a French machine gun school in Italy. Killed in Action June 15th 1918. Aged 23.

HINCKLEY TIMES JUNE 1918

Second-Lieutenant T L Goode was killed in action on 15th June 1918. It is with the deepest regret that the news was received on 24th June of his demise. He was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs E J Goode of Queens Road, Hinckley. A letter from his commanding officer stated that he had been killed in action on 15th June: “The Austrians had broken through on our battalion front and were surrounding the battalion HQ. Your son gathered some men and helped to defend the position until he was shot in the stomach and killed. The enemy was held up and your son’ great coolness and courage was largely responsible for this”. Second Lieutenant Goode was born on 30th December 1894 and was educated at St. Mary’s School, where he gained a scholarship to Hinckley Grammar School in 1907. He was a prefect from 1910 to 1913 and senior prefect in the last year, 1913.

In February 1914 he was articled to Messrs. J Pritchard &Co, Chartered Accountants, Colmore Road, Birmingham. He was very successful in the profession. He joined the Honourable Artillery Company Infantry Section in 1915. In 1916 he went to Cadet School at Clifton, Bristol and in March 1917 he obtained his commission as a Second Lieutenant attached to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. On 30th May 1918 he was mentioned in General Plumer’s Despatches for distinguished and gallant service and devotion to duty. His body was buried in a British Cemetery, behind the lines. The deceased was a highly respected Sunday School teacher at St. Mary’s, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father Ernest John Goode received a payment of £93 8s on 22nd May 1919 and a further payment of £6 10s on 13th August 1919.

 

Private Frederick Henry Granger 1638

1st April 1917

D Company 49th Battalion Australian Infantry

Vaulx Hill Cemetery, Vaulx Vraucourt, France

Plot 1 Row F Grave 30

Age 35

Born Leicester

Son of Mr and Mrs F Granger, Wykin Hall, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Granger, Glengarry, Tasmania.

From the Australian National Archives:  He initially served in the 40th Battalion AIF, enlisting on 30th March 1916. He declares that he had worked as an apprentice millwright in England. His wife Matilda, lived in Westbury, Tasmania. He embarked at Hobart on 1st July 1916 and arrived a Devonport on 22nd August 1916. He trained in the 7th Training Battalion and joined the 26th Battalion AIF on 14th October 1916. Two days later, 16th October 1916, he marched into Etaples with his unit. On 1st November 1916 he was taken on strength with the 49th Battalion AIF. He was killed in April 1917. He stood 5ft 9 inches and gave g his denomination as Church of England. He was buried by Rev Leo M Bergin a Roman Catholic Chaplain. His widow did receive a pension of 40/- per week from 25th June 1917 for herself and two sons – Frederick (15/-) and Frank (20/-).

His widow received his physical effects on 12th November 1917 but wrote asking whether her husband’s ring had been found, as it was of great personal value to her. It remained lost. The effects returned to her were: Leather bag; Identity Disc; safety Razor; 2 Metal watches (damaged0; 2 writing pads; a Song Book; Tobacco Pouch;Knife;2 Note Books; Souvenir Album; Postcards; Photos and Letters. The Australian army authorities in December 1932 were looking for the whereabouts of the widow and were informed that she had died on 9th September 1928. His youngest son, Frederick was living in Launceston, Tasmania. The authorities had posted details of Private Granger’s burial details to the widow but had been sent them back undelivered. The burial details were important for it appears that Private Granger was initially buried in the Australian cemetery, Vaulx-Vraucourt. This cemetery had British bodies later exhumed for burial at Vaulx Hill Cemetery. Three unidentified Australian bodies were also removed and it was assumed that Granger was one of them. It was not recorded in the reburial process where the Australians were interred. The Australian authorities decided to erect a headstone for each of the unknowns bearing the inscription “Buried near this spot”.

He was awarded the 1914-1915 Star, the British War Medal and the Australian Victory Medal. His widow was sent a memorial plaque and scroll.

HINCKLEY TIMES 19TH MAY 1917

News has reached the Hinckley district that Private Frederick Henry Granger of the Australian Imperial Force, eldest son of Mr and Mrs F W Granger of Wykin Hall, Hinckley, was killed in action, in France, in April.

The late Private Granger, who was a company bomber, was 35 years of age. He was born whilst his family lived at Burbage Fields and spent his early years on his father’s firm.

In 1906 he migrated to Tasmania and settled on a large farm there. He enlisted in the Australian forces in April 1916 and came to England after six weeks of training. He spent his leave in August at home in Wykin and left for France at the end of September. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Granger and family and for the widow and two children in bereavement.

 

Private Joseph Albert Grant 41383

Died 28th December 1918

2nd Squadron (Cavalry) Machine Gun Corps formerly 18th Hussars

Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimelle, France

Plot 12 Row E Grave 13

Age 26

Son of Mr Joseph and Mrs Mary Maria Grant, 45 Stockwell Head, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 45 Stockwell Head, Hinckley and was employed as a Hosiery Hand Circular Frame. He had 5 siblings – Maud, Grace, Mary, James and Hilda.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star. He first went to France on 15th August 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES SEPTEMBER 1914

Hinckley Man at Mons – Injured Private who saw his comrade’s head blown off.

A graphic account of the Battle near Mons is given to the “Hinckley Times” representative this week by Private J Grant of the 15th Hussars, who had been invalided after partially recovering from a wound on the right hand which was caused by a piece of shrapnel during the fighting near Mons.

The wounded man stated that just prior to the occurrence he was engaged scouting to ascertain the position of the enemy for the artillery and was at the time he received the wound under cover behind a hill. A shell flew over him and bursting the air about 13 yards from the ground a piece of shrapnel struck him, breaking his finger and leaving a nasty wound on his hand. A little later he was ordered to ride to the military hospital and a few days later was taken to a hospital at Brighton.

Grant described the first few minutes that he was under fire as a very trying time. Soldiers, however, were troubling very little about the flying bullets but the horrible shriek which accompanied the discharged was nerve racking. He saw a comrade’s head blown clean off his shoulders by a bursting shell and on another occasion saw a horse, after having its head severed, run a number of yards before dropping dead.

Private Grant describes the German soldiers as a splendidly built lot of fellows on the whole. Their rifle fire is, however, very poor, they shoot from the hip while the British troops take careful aim, as if at a range. He added that the losses to the British at Mons were very heavy owing to being so greatly outnumbered and having to retreat on account of German flanking movements. At one time the majority of them had very little hope of extricating themselves.

The use of aeroplanes greatly assisted the Germans in ascertaining the position of the British, while our own artillery, owing to the aerial scouts, had to continually change their position.

HINCKLEY TIMES 25TH JANUARY 1919

First Hinckley Man to be wounded dies in Germany

A Mons man, Private Joseph Grant of the Machine Gun Corps, formerly of the 18th Hussars has died of pneumonia in Germany. Grant enlisted in 1911 and when war broke out, was in the first contingent of the British Expeditionary Force to arrive in France. He was present at Mons and was the first Hinckley man to be wounded in the war. Recovering from his wounds, he returned to France in February 1915 and fought in many of the important battles up to the day of the armistice. He was seized with illness while serving with the Army of Occupation at Cologne and died while in a Red Cross train while on his way to Boulogne. A son of Mr and Mrs J Grant of 45 Stockwell Head, Hinckley, he was 26b years of age and before joining the army was employed at the hosiery factory of Moore Eady Murcott Goode Ltd, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £60 1s 10d on 2nd June 1919 which included a war gratuity of £25 10s. The record says that he died on the 25th Ambulance Train in France.

 

 

 

 

Private Leonard Grewcock 20812

Killed in Action 14th July 1916

9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, France

Pier 2 Face C Pier 3 Face A

Born Barwell Enlisted Hinckley Living Barwell

Brother of Mr G Grewcock, 2 Albert Road, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living with his stepbrother, Mr. Alfred Faulks and his wife Eliza Faulks, at 73 High Street, Barwell and was employed as a Finisher in the Boot Trade. He had 1 sibling – Walter Grewcock.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 29th December 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 28th APRIL 1917

Official news is to hand that Private Leonard Grewcock of the Leicesters was killed in action on July 14th of last year. He was previously posted as missing. According to a letter received by the deceased’s elder brother, Mr G H Grewcock of 2 Albert Road, Hinckley, from an officer, the late Private Grewcock was last seen at 11.00am on the 14th July, apparently alright in himself but helping a wounded colleague to a dressing station. He joined the army about two years ago. Prior to enlistment he worked at the boot factory of Messrs. Arguile Grewcock and Ward of Barwell.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father, Mr. George Grewcock, received a payment of £6 18s 11d on 18th August 17 and a war gratuity of £3 on 10th October 1919.

 

Private Walter Grewcock 24449

Killed in Action 21st August 1916

2nd Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment

Euston Road Cemetery, Colincamps, France

Plot 1 Row D Grave 29

Age 24

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs Eliza Grewcock, 22 Spencer Street, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was single and living with his parents Mr Thomas Grewcock and Mrs Harriet Grewcock at 23 Spencer Street, Hinckley. He was employed as a Warehouseman and had 7 siblings - Nellie, Walter, Lionel, Sydney, Elsie, John and Leonard.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 16TH SEPTEMBER 1916

Mrs. Grewcock of 22 Spencer Street, Hinckley, has received information that hr husband private W Grewcock 22440, of the South Staffordshire Regiment, has died of shell shock.Twenty Four years of age, Grewcock was called up as a Derby recruit in April last year. He was trained at Cannock Chase and went to France about 10 weeks ago. He formerly worked at the hosiery factory of Messrs. Atkins Bros at Hinckley and was highly esteemed by his former fellow workers. In a letter to his widow, Private J Cassel, says the deceased’s dearth came as a great shock to the whole battalion. He was a great favourite with the other soldiers and always did his work cheerfully and manfully. Grewcock, in addition to a widow, leaves a child.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £2 8s 5d on 11th December 1916 and a war gratuity of £3 on 25th November 1919.

 

Private Samuel Grimes 20501

1/4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Died at Home 23rd July 1918 – of Phthisis and Asthenia.

Age 37

Husband of Mrs Leah Grimes, 61 Rugby Road, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 61 Rugby Road with his wife and one child – Samuel. He was employed as a Boot and Shoe Finisher.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal

 

 

Private Sydney Edward Grove 10145

Killed in Action 30th October 1914

20th Hussars

Menin Gate memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Age 26

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Edward Grove and Mrs Keturah Grove, Hinckley.

Unitarian Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living on Hollycroft with his parents. He was employed as a Boot Dealer and had 3 siblings – Clarence, Constance and Lilla.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star (with clasp).

HINCKLEY TIMES 15TH APRIL 1916

News is to hand that Private Sydney Edward Grove a well-known Hinckley soldier and athlete is presumed dead after being missing since October 30thn 1914. The late Private Grove enlisted in June 1913 in the 20th Hussars and soon became a proficient soldier. His Regiment was one of the first to arrive in France with the BEF to take part in the early movements of the war.

Towards the latter part of October, less than three months after landing on foreign soil, Grove was sent out on a certain duty near Messines and never returned. The War Office have informed his aunt, Mrs Abbott of the Borough, with whom he lived prior to enlisting, that after causing a search of numerous internment camps in Germany to have been made unsuccessfully, that they must now presume that he was killed in action on October 30th 1914.

The late Private Grove was a well-built athletic type of fellow. He was 28 years of age and was well liked by his colleagues in his career in the army. The fact that he was personally complimented on for his smartness by his commanding officer and that the fact that he was one of 40 Hussars, all the rest being experienced, who were chosen for a certain duty, shows that his future as a soldier was a promising one.

For some years he lived at Barwell being employed in the stockroom of the factory of Messrs Geary Bros. He had been a member of the Leicestershire Yeomanry and the Captain of Hinckley Swimming Club since its inception, winning many prizes at the various Galas in Hinckley, Leicester and Coventry and other places. As a polo player he had few equals locally. Grove was also a boxer of reputation and a fine footballer, being full back for Barwell United. At Colchester, in an army boxing competition, Grove was the Heavyweight Champion, beating Private Gilbert in the final and also figured with success in the battalion polo team which beat Colchester.

Army Registers of Effects: His Aunt, Mrs Lilla J Abbott received a payment of 3 shillings on 16th October 1916.

 

Sergeant William Growdridge 240008

CROIX DE GUERRE, BELGIUM

Died of Wounds 12th January 1918

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Choques Military Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row O Grave 1

Age 35

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs Alice Growdridge.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 4 Brick Kiln Street with his Father, Mr Henry Growdridge. He was employed as a Rib Hosiery Hand. He had 4 siblings – Mary. Lilla, Ernest and Horace.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 27th February 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 9TH FEBRUARY 1918

It is reported that Sergeant William Growdridge of the Leicestershire Regiment has died of wounds in France on January 12th 1918. Sergeant Growdridge was badly wounded by a trench mortar on January 1th and died the following day at a Casualty Clearing Station. He was aged 35 years. He went to France with the Hinckley Territorials in the early days of the war and was wounded by a sniper in September 1915 spending over four months in hospital, returning to France in October 1916. He served with the Hinckley Volunteers forn18 years and held a long service medal. He played football for Hinckley United and worked at Sketchley Dyeworks. His widow lives at 34 Queens Road, Hinckley.

LEICESTER DAILY MAIL 17TH APRIL 1918

He was a crackshot taking part in several of the big competitions at Syston, often assisting Hinckley to win the Burnaby Shield. He was a much respected member of Hinckley Liberal Club.

He is mentioned in the Battalion History as a Signaller.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £23 5s 10d on 9th April 1918 and a war gratuity of £19 on 15th November 1919.

 

 

 

Temporary Second Lieutenant Ernest Louis Hall

Died of Wounds 6th November 1917

 D Company 11th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinge, Belgium

Plot 21 Row EE Grave 21

Son of William John and Edith Mary Hall, 47 Clarence Road, Hinckley.

St Peter’s Church Memorial

Hinckley Grammar School Memorial

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Private family memorial in St Peter’s Church, Hinckley

1911 Census: His address is given as 47 Clarence Road, Hinckley. His occupation is given as a carpenter’s apprentice.  He is the eldest of seven siblings: Mary Winifred, Edith Gertrude, Catherine Agnes, Agatha Mary, Vincent John and William Francis.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-15 Star. There had been a request from his mother for the 1914-1915 Star which was granted.

HINCKLEY TIMES 17TH NOVEMBER 1917

A telegram received by Mr and Ms Hall of Clarence Road, Hinckley, last Thursday night, intimated that Second Lieutenant E L Hall of the Leicesters, had succumbed to wounds at the 3rd Canadian Casualty Clearing station.

Major R Radford, commanding the Leicesters, has since written to Mr and Mrs Hall explaining that the deceased was wounded by a shell that landed amongst a party he was in command of, killing eight and wounding ten others.

Major Radford added: “I was in great hopes that he would recover poor fellow. H was taken at once to an advanced dressing station and then to the Canadian Casualty Clearing Station. This was a good way behind the line and I was unable to go myself or send any of my officers to see him and now the battalion has moved a long way off. Your son joined me on October 15th and indeed I am very sorry to lose such a promising officer and I hope that you will accept my sympathy, as well as that of the officers of this battalion, in the great loss you and your family have incurred”. Second Lieutenant Hall, who was an old boy of Hinckley Grammar School was mobilised with the Hinckley Territorials on the outbreak of war. He proceeded to Luton and after six months went out to France. He participated in much severe fighting including the attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt and the memorable engagements on the Somme. He was made a corporal of the signalling section in October 1915.

In February last he came home to study for his commission and passing out well was in August gazetted to the Leicester. He re-joined his regiment at Partington and a fortnight later was sent on a draft to the front. He had been back in the firing line less than a month. Much sympathy is felt for Mr. and Mrs Hall in their bereavement. The deceased was a much respected young man of great promise. Before the outbreak of the war he assisted his father in the building business. He was a member of St Peter’s Club, Dramatic Society and Football Club, the members of which deplore his loss.

FROM OFFICER RECORDS:

Born 25th August 1894 at Queens Road, Hinckley.

Son of William John Hall and Edith Mary Hall, 47 Clarence Road, Hinckley. He had two brothers and four sisters.

He enlisted on 20thh March 1913 as a Private in the 1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, originally with the service number 1530, which was later changed to 240165. He was a carpenter by trade working with his father. His height was 5ft 4 ins. He embarked for France on 27th February 1915 landing at Le Harve.

29th August 1915 – Too field hospital with inflamed tonsils

30th August 1915 – Admitted to No1 Canadian General Hospital in Etaples

26th September 1915 – Arrived at 46th Divisional Base Depot at Rouen

27theptember 1915 – Proceeded to rejoin unit

26th December 1915 – admitted to hospital with Impetigo

9th January 1916 – he rejoins his unit

15th April 1916 – Promoted Corporal to complete establishment of signallers

13th February 1917 – Sent to England to train for a commission

7th April 1917 – to No 5 Officer Cadet Battalion at Cambridge

31st July 1917 – granted a temporary Commission in the Leicestershire Regiment

6th November 1917 – Died of Wounds

 

During his period of service, Temporary Second Lieutenant Ernest Hall sent back letters to his family and friends which found their way into Hinckley Grammar School Magazine and St Peter’s Parish Magazine.

 

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Spring Term 1915

“From Private E Hall, 5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, to his parents, 19th December 1914……

Once more we have been inspected by the King and I have the pleasure of having my own salute answered by him. I got to a level crossing near a small village, which you have got to get over to get to Sawbridgeworth. When I landed there the gates were shut and I had to wait. I had only been there two or three seconds when the King’s car dashed up. It was kept waiting about three minutes and I had good look at him and as he drove off saluted and he answered it. I didn’t half feel big as there was no one else there”

 

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Spring term 1915

Letter of 13th March 1915……”We left camp there on Sunday and had 20 hours riding in first class “modele deluxe”, or otherwise horseboxes. There were 38 men in a box, except ours which was luckily overlooked and only had a dozen in it. We were travelling from 7.00pm Sunday till 4.00pm Monday and during the day sat with the doors open watching the scenery. Some parts are very nice but on the whole it is not such nice country as England and is largely waste ground. My bit of French knowledge has come in quite useful and I am always acting as interpreter for the other fellows. The people here speak Flemish and French and we are about 16 miles off the firing line. The Leicestershire Yeomanry rode through here yesterday and we saw Mr. Dudley Atkins and several Hinckley fellows, who all looked well. We also met a lot of the 2nd Leicesters at our last camp and I knew several of them. We expect to leave here tonight and train nearly up to the trenches. Everyone out here thinks the war will be over this year, as the Germans are getting sick of it. General French and the Prince of Wales pass along the main road here from Headquarters to the firing line and General Joffre’s headquarters have been about two miles from here”

 

St Peter’s Parish Magazine May 1915

Letter of 10th April

We left the base at 9.30pm and landed at headquarters about 1 o’clock. We relieved the South Welsh and took over the trenches entirely on our own with the 4th Leicesters on our left and the Staffords on our right. The headquarters were at the remains of a large farm and a thousand yards behind the firing line. We were not allowed to have a fire in the daytime or t allow a light to be seen at night as the Germans shelled us on the least suspicion of the farm being used. The telephone wires were already connected to all the trenches and various farms and the Welsh gave us a general idea of the scheme before they left. We had two companies in the first line trenches and two in the reserve and we at once got in touch with them and messages started to come in from each trench, and continued to do so almost all the five days we were there. The value of the phone was proved here, as absolutely everything depends on constant communication. It began to get rather uncomfortable n the night as it rained hard and the being very little of the roof left overhead it came on to us all over the place. We had a spare wire running down into the cellar in case of being shelled and also had dug-outs near in case the place became absolutely untenable. There was very heavy firing on Monday night when the Germans thought we were due to relieve the Welsh. I did night duty on the phone while I was there and slept during the day. On Tuesday the first fellow to be wounded outside our farm was brought in with a bullet through the shoulder and which could be seen in his right arm. A bit later an officer was brought in belonging to the 4th Leicester suffering from wounded toes from a bullet. Tuesday night was a very busy time for us and at 6.30 Wednesday morning the first 5th Leicesters casualty was reported, being a Private Harmer of D Coy who was shot through the head and who died immediately. All reports of casualties came at once to Headquarters, so we knew exactly how things were going. During the morning I climbed up the loft to have a look at an observation post which was fixed in the roof. An enormous amount of corn and tobacco leaves was lying all over the place. The household things were exactly as they were left when the owners fled. Two or three pigeons still flew about and with a couple of cats were all that as left of the livestock of the farm. A dead pig lay in the middle of the farmyard and the rest of the cows etc lay dead on the way to the trenches. In the afternoon the news came through of the death of Private John Goode. It came as a great shock to us as he was the first Hinckley man among us to get killed and was so well known to all of us. He was shot through the jaw and remained unconscious for some time before he died. Snipers were very busy about this time and the bullets kept rattling the tiles of what was left of our roof. A whole company of the 4th Leicesters got lost and had to be guided from our headquarters to their own as it as getting light and this seemed to have somewhat given our position away to the enemy, for it was hardly safe to move outside the door. Our Colonel went out and at once had two shrapnel shells and a shower of bullets after him, which struck one of the barns. On Thursday I went with another fellow across the yard to look in a barn which the Germans destroyed by shrapnel fire earlier in the war and which was burnt to the ground. In it we found the charred remains of three poor fellows who appear to have been killed as they lay there. We found two of their identity discs and they belonged to the 4th East Surreys. The barn contained thousands of rounds of ammunition (which had been exploded by the fire) and the brass buttons, etc, of the dead men. The snipers started once more to work and we returned to the house as the bullets came rather too near to be pleasant. By Thursday night we had six or seven men wounded more or less seriously. We should have been relieved at night but received news that we were not to be until the following night. Friday passed without any further casualties and we were relieved by the 4th Lincolns at 12 pm got safely back to our base at 3 am. We received some very interesting reports from the trenches each day while we were there and I mention the following as an example. On Wednesday night a door in the parapet of the German trenches was seen to open and a party of Germans wearing round caps came through. They lay down in front of their trench with fixed bayonets as though they were going to charge ours. When however, a star shell was sent up by our officers they received such a storm of bullets from our fellows that they turned and ran, and those that were not killed or wounded climbed over their own parapet again. Our fellows stood the test of lying in the wet and muddy trenches wonderfully, well and they got the highest praise from the regular troops out here. We are now resting for four days, and get a bath and change of clothing tomorrow and shall then do another spell in the trenches again, which will be our regular routine now. We are billeted in huts after the style of those in use in England and shall return here ach time to rest.  The five days naturally seemed rather long cut off from the world but I guess we shall get used to that.

 

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – May 1915

Letter of 19th April, 1915

On Monday night a Zeppelin came over here and dropped bombs on the town near, killing some civilians. It came right over our barn and the troops opened fire on it, but it got away successfully. On Tuesday we had a jam roll and roast beef for dinner and set off for the trenches at 6.30pm. On reaching the dressing station we found that Frenchman’s Farm was untenable owing to its having been heavily shelled by the enemy the day before when the Lincolns were there. They also shelled the next farm with shrapnel and killed one officer and two men and injured eight others. We therefore went to another farm (Cob) and stayed there without being disturbed. On Wednesday I had my first journey up to the trenches. We had to carry a sheet of corrugated iron each for a new signaller’s dugout, being built for when an advance is made and which will be used for headquarters. It is a pretty rotten job going up, as heaps of bullets whistle about, and most of our fellows get shot whilst taking rations, etc, up to the firing line.

There is a narrow boarded track to walk on, and unless you are very careful you suddenly find yourself in a “Jack Johnson” hole up to the waist in water. All the party I was with got there safely and we brought a wounded man back with us from the support trenches. On Thursday everyone had to stand to as an attack was expected but then it passed fairly quiet. Friday also passed uneventfully, though we were pretty busy on the phone. We should have been relieved by the Lincolns on Saturday night but about 4 pm the order came that we were ordered to help with artillery and rifle fire. It was the fiercest battle I have yet heard, and the noise of the guns all night was terrific. According to report, it was quite successful and for hundred yards of trenches were occupied and held against all counter attacks. Heavy losses were inflicted on the enemy while our own losses were slight. We were complimented on our splendid assistance and did not have a single casualty while the heavy firing was going on. We were relieved last night and the battalion left the trenches with two casualties. Our losses during the week were three killed and seven or eight wounded. I got to our hut about twelve o’clock and had a good night’s sleep. The weather is much better now and it’s a lovely day today and quite hot in the sun. So far no signallers have be hurt and I think that it is one of the best jobs at the trenches, they are fairly safe in their dugouts while the company fellows have to stand in the trenches. I think we shall have some lively times here presently as fresh lots of artillery are being brought into position and the Germans very rarely reply to our gun fire each day.

 

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – July 15

From Private E L Hall to his parents, June 5th 1915:

“We are having a very decent time at present, but have so far been rather unfortunate with our losses this time. A big shell, one of several sent over by the enemy, burst just against our headquarters in the village about two miles from the firing line and did a great deal of damage. The colonel’s orderly and servant who were standing  holding the two hoses of our colonel and the fourth Lincolns’, were with the latter colonel and the horses instantly killed, while our own colonel was wounded, in three places,, and a signaller, Gerald Ayres, who was near, was also wounded but not very badly. The shell blew the house down next to where the operator sat at the telephone and he had a very lucky escape. All our wires were smashed, so that we have had to use my station as headquarters today while they moved to another house. The colonel is already in England and going on as well as can be expected. We are rather short of officers now as the adjutant is ill and in hospital and our senior major, Major Martin, has taken over the command of the 4th Leicesters. The dugout we are now in is easily the best we have had as it is pretty big and we have a nice chair each and two polished oak tables in, as well as a whatnot and several sacred and other pictures hanging on the walls. These were obtained from several ruined farms near here where the former inhabitants have left almost everything behind.”

 

 

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – July 1915

From Private E L Hall, June 17th, 1915:

“Sunday passed fairly quietly, though we were shelled in the afternoon without any damage being done. A number of our men were wounded in the firing trenches but no one killed. On Monday our wires to the next support point were broken and I went out with another fellow to mend them. We had just done so when we heard the sound of a big shell coming towards us. It burst on the slope about fifty yards from us and had we not been lying flat on  the ground, which we did as soon as we heard it coming, I’m afraid that we should have had a few lumps in us as hundreds of pieces of shell flew over us cutting through the high grass like a mowing machine. We then went back to our dugout and three minutes afterwards another shell came, cutting a large tree clean through the middle, which we had just come under on our way back. The tree falling once more broke the wires and we again went to mend them, but this time without any lively incidents. On Tuesday the Headquarters were brought forward to our station, while we supported an attack which was being made on our left. The Germans seemed to have got wind of our intentions, as at 9.30pm  it seemed as though the heavens were opened, the enemy blew three trench mines up and then slung “coal-boxes” and high explosives, shrapnel, rifle grenades and every imaginable thing across while their infantry opened up a terrific fire. The mines were blown up just on our left and were in front of the trenches held by our division. Some forty or more poor fellows were killed and injured and they were still digging for those who were buried when we came out. According to report one or more of the mines burst in between the lines and did great damage to their own trenches. You can guess what the shock was, as tin fell off a shelf at headquarters, nearly two miles away. Our fellows kept up a heavy fire all night and some 100,000 rounds of ammunition passed through our place and were used. At3 pm our trench mortars and artillery etc retaliated and had a good amount of success. I have never heard such heavy rifle fire before and the shots were like hail over our place and the cracking in the tress made a fearful noise. Everything quietened down after 5am and everything went on as usual with slight rifle firing and an occasional shell bursting. Tuesday and Wednesday passed pretty quietly, but we were not sorry to be relieved after so much noise”.

 

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – August 1915

Private Ernest Hall to his parents, July 25th 1915:

Yesterday was one of the most eventful and liveliest days that we have had for some time. Just before 7 pm we were ordered to leave the dugout and take the phone into the firing trench, as our men were ready to explode a mine under the German trenches, in front of the centre trenches occupied by the 5th. A small sap was blown up first and then the large mine. The earth rocked similar to an earthquake and an enormous cloud of dirt, sandbags etc was thrown up into the air. The damage done to the enemy’s parapet was very extensive and from what could be seen their losses heavy. At the same time as the explosion our artillery concentrated heavy fire on the enemy’s trenches and did some good work. The enemy replied by shelling us very heavily but fortunately did not do much material damage. After a time things quietened down and we went back to the dugout with the phone. I was on duty there at 9.30pm when the place began to rock and another explosion was heard. It proved to be an enemy mine in front of the right trench occupied by us and the left of the 4th Leicesters.  Fortunately, it burst some twenty yards in front of the trench and therefore didn’t do so much damage as ours. Some twelve or fifteen poor fellows in Captain Griffith’s company were killed and a nice few wounded. They chiefly belonged to Melton Mowbray and were all buried and some are still missing. A party who were out on listening patrol were near to where the mine exploded and no trace of them has been found. I think the Germans seem to have really lost their heads or their mine would not have gone up so soon. In one case one of their men got over his own parapet and started to run towards our lines. He was at once riddled with bullets, rather unfortunate, I thought as some useful information might have been obtained had we taken him alive. Another battle was expected on our right at Hill…… but nothing has happened up to now and the night has passed fairly quietly”

 

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – August 1915

Private E L Hall to his parents, 27th July 1915:

“We were relieved on Sunday night and reached our bivouac field about 12 midnight. For once we were very lucky as an artillery sergeant major passing with  an  ammunition column asked if we would like a ride on the limbers and we had one nearly all the way back. On the last day in the trenches we had a splendid view of an enemy aeroplane being brought down by one of our own airmen. He had been flying over our trenches all afternoon until about five o’clock, when we suddenly saw one of ours coming at a tremendous rate and trying to get level with him. He succeeded in getting level and then poured a rapid fire from a machine gun into the German, whose machine at once burst into flame and turned upside down. The pilot of the enemy machine was a very plucky fellow, as upside down and his machine on fire as it was, he succeeded in flying spirally from an enormous height until he was on a short distance from the ground. His observer fell out when they were about a thousand feet up and fell between the lines, while the pilot fell with his machine just behind the trench I was in. He was alive when found but died in a short time. On our way out from the trenches we passed very close to the machine but could not see much owing to it being dark. We only stayed in the bivouac field for the night and then marched up to some huts next to those we formerly occupied”.

 

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Autumn Term 1915

Also St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – November 1915

From Private E L Hall to his parents, 18th October 1915….

“About 2 o’clock last Tuesday, we started to march from our billets towards the trenches, which were about 12 miles away. When about four miles from the line we halted for three hours, whilst food etc was served out to us. At 9 o’clock we started on the last part of the journey, which took us until daylight on Wednesday morning, stoppages being constantly caused by troops coming out of the trenches and men only being able to enter the communication trench in single file. I went up to the battalion headquarters, which were in the support trenches and we proceeded to lay out a wire to the Brigade dugouts. We then had a short rest until 12 o’clock, when our artillery bombardment started and continued until 2 o’clock, the enemy retaliating with “crumps” and lyddite shells, which burst unpleasantly near us. Directly the bombardment finished the 4th Leicesters and the 5th Lincolns mounted the parapet and began to double across the open, the 4th Lincolns at once following. It was the first charge that our fellows had made and in the words of some Guards who witnessed it, was simply magnificent. Although raked by Maxims and Shell fire, the men continued on in irresistible lines and the first and second lines of  the enemy were occupied and passed over and then the redoubt, or what remained of it after our artillery fire, was also occupied as was also the next trench. Part of the 5th Leicesters, who had at intervals come up to reinforce the attack, penetrated right through to a village behind the enemy  lines, this being I  believe, the furthest point reached by any men in the Division. They had to retreat again owing to the enemy’s fire and the trench in front of the redoubt was also evacuated but the main part of the redoubt was held and the Leicester  and Lincoln Brigade was relieved from there at night by the Notts and Derbys brigade, who had been in the Divisional Reserve. The other Brigade in the Division, the Stafford, were operating on our right but I am not able to say how they went on, except that they no doubt helped towards the success of the divisional attack. We were relieved at daybreak on the Friday morning by the Guards and after marching to the ruined town of V…., were embarked on motor lorries, which took us to our billets. The losses of the Division were very heavy but I think the enemy’s were even greater and considering that we were fighting against the Prussian Guards and Bavarians (which is proved by the helmets captured from them), the fight was a great victory for the “Terrors”. Yesterday afternoon, we were inspected by the GOC, who congratulated us on our success. We are at present having ten days rest, when we shall be once more ready for whatever we are again asked to do”

 

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Summer Term 1916

From Private E L Hall to his parents….”We had a very pleasant journey, our carriages being wonderful to relate, second-class passenger coaches and we came back much quicker then we went down the line. W has three day rations with u and  with our kit, and ten of us a carriage, you can imagine there was not much room to spare but we  managed to make ourselves pretty comfortable and with a small tin for a fire bucket, we had hot drinks where we wanted them and we had plenty of wood for fuel. Some of the Frenchies looked at us when they saw our fire and I am afraid the ceilings of the coach were a  shade darker when we left them but we still had to live and we don’t usually bother  about trifles”

 

 

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine –Autumn Term 1916

From Private E L Hall to his father: “I choose or rather get some queer hours for letter writing. It is nearly midnight now and I don’t suppose I shall get down this side of one o’clock, but I shall be ready for breakfast at 7 as usual. I am splendidly fit and six hours sleep seems plenty while we are up here. Our left sector made a raid last night and succeeded in killing a few Boches and bringing a helmet and identification marks back again, besides doing a good deal of damage to the enemy trenches. There was a very heavy rainfall last night and some of the trenches are knee deep in water….It has been getting later than ever now, as the Intelligence Officer has been giving us some Shakespeare recitations. He is a fine fellow and a great friend to all the section”.

 

 

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Autumn Term 1916

From Second Lieutenant E L Hall, 3rd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, to the headmaster…..”I took my commission in the Leicestershire Regiment a couple of months ago and I am at present stationed at Partington. My training course, preparatory to obtaining a commission, took place at Cambridge and I spent a most enjoyable time there for four months. Aft two years in France it has been a great change to be back among such congenial surroundings for work. Like most good things, the time has, however, come again when I shall be saying good-bye to England for another uncertain period. I rather hope it will be the Eastern Front this time, as it would be a change in every way from the Western”.

 

 

 

 

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine –November 1917

Second-Lieutenant Ernest L Hall lies in a hospital in France dangerously wounded in the chest. He received his commission on August 4th last and was gazetted to the 11th Leicesters. After being here for a few days on draft leave, he went to France on September 25th and had been there just a month when he was wounded (October 23rd). He is now in the Third Canadian Casualty Clearing Station and his orderly writes that he has undergone an operation to remove the shot and is making favourable progress. It is shortly expected that he will be removed down to the base preparatory to his departure for England. We are pleased to announce that Mrs W J Hall is recovering from the effects of shock occasioned on learning the news of her son’s injury. She has also regained her speech.

 

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – December 1917

Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs W J Hall and Mr and Mrs J G Burchnall in the loss of their eldest sons. Both were in their twenty fourth year and had been lifelong friends and it so happened that they died on the same day, though inn different spheres of the world-wide war.

Despite the hope entertained of his removal and recovery, Second Lieutenant Ernest L Hall succumbed on November 6th to his wounds at the 3rd Canadian Casualty Clearing Station, France.

Major R H Radford, commanding the Leicesters, wrote later to Mr and Mrs Hall explaining that the deceased was wounded by a shell which landed right amongst a party he was in command of, killing eight and wounding ten others. Major Radford added: “I was in great hopes he would recover, poor fellow. He was taken at once to an advanced dressing station and then onto the Canadian Casualty Clearing Station. This was a good way behind the line and I was unable to go myself or send any of my officers to see him and now the battalion has moved a long way off. Your son only joined me on the 15th October and I am indeed very sorry to lose such a promising officer and I hope that you will accept my sympathy as well as that of the officers of the battalion in the great loss you and your family have incurred”.

Captain A W Petre, Officer Commanding D Company, also writes to offer his sympathy: “Though your son had only been with us a short time, he had endeared himself to all of us and I feel that we have lost not only a splendid Officer but also a true and trusted friend. There is little I can tell you of his last hours as I left the country on the day following that on which your son was wounded but I am assured that everything that medical skill could do for him was done and that at no time after his arrival at the CCS was he in great pain.”

Second Lieutenant Hall was an old boy of Hinckley Grammar School and was mobilised with the Hinckley Territorials on the outbreak of war. He proceeded to Luton and after six months training went out to France. Here he participated in much severe fighting, including the attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt and the memorable engagements on the Somme. He was made a corporal of the signalling section in October 1915.

In February last he came home to study for his commission and passing out well, was in August gazetted to the Leicesters. He rejoined his regiment at Patrington and a fortnight later was sent on draft to the front. He had been back in the firing line less than a month.

The deceased, besides being a member of St. Peter’s Club and the Football Club was also a member of our Dramatic Society and acted in both of its productions. In “Don Quixote” he took the part of secretary to Sancho Panza. He is the fifth member the Society has lost by death in a little less than two years. A Mass will be offered during January next for his eternal repose – RIP”.

 

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Obituary

ERNEST LOUIS HALL (1905 – 1909), mobilised with the Hinckley Territorials on the outbreak of war; trained at Luton for six months. Went to France 1915; took part in the attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt and in the Battle of the Somme; corporal in the signalling section, October 1915. Returned to England in February 1917; trained for a commission at Trinity College, Cambridge; gazetted to the 11th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, August 1917. He proceeded again to the front in August. He was killed in Action November 6th, 1917.  Aged 23.

Army Register of Effects: The sum of £70 14s 11d was paid to his father William Hall and his mother Edith M Hall on4th March 1918. A war gratuity of £18 was paid to the parents on 31st October 1919.

 

 

 

 

 

Lance-Corporal John Hall 11718

Killed in Action 14th July 1916

7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial, France

Pier 2 Face C Pier 3 Face A

Age 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living in Hinckley

Son of Mr. John Hall, Queens Road, Hinckley. Husband of Jessie Hall.

 

St. Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: Living at 17 Duke Street, Hinckley. He was a bricklayer by trade. There were two children in 1911.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. First went to France on 29th July 1915

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – October 1916

After being officially reported as wounded and in an unknown hospital in France, Lance-Corporal John Hall, of the 7th Leicesters, we regret to say, is now announced to have been killed in action on July 14th last. The sad news was conveyed in the following letter from Captain E N Dickinson of the deceased’s company:

” BEF September 5th 1916 – Dear Mrs Hall…I regret to read in your letter of 30th August that you have received no news of your husband, No 7/11718, Lance-Corporal, Hall J. He was officially reported wounded on July 14th 1916, but information has quite recently come to hand and I deeply regret now having to tell you that your husband was “killed in action” July 14th 1916. I cannot give you any further details of his death but I know he died a true soldier doing his duty for “King and Country” manfully and well. May this be some consolation to you and your little ones. I remain, Yours Sincerely, E N Dickinson, Captain Commanding B Company.”

Lance-Corporal Hall, who was in his twenty – ninth year, enlisted in the earliest groups of Kitchener’s army, shortly after the outbreak of war and went out to France with the machine gun section of a battalion of the Leicesters in August 1915. The sincere sympathy of all goes out to his parents and to his widow and her five little children.

HINCKLEYTMES 16TH SEPTEMBER 1916

Information is to hand that Lance-Corporal John Hall of the Leicesters, the third son of Mr John Hall, builder, Queens Road, Hinckley, was killed in action on July 14th last. He was previously reported as missing. The news was conveyed to Hall’s wife in a letter from Captain E N Dickinson, of the deceased’s company. Lance-Corporal Hall, who enlisted in the earliest group of Kitchener’s army in September 1914, was in the employ of his father. His brother George Hall, has twice been wounded.

The deceased leaves a widow and five children who reside in Duke Street. He was a well-known member of St. Peter’s Church and was a prominent figure on St. Peter’s cricket and football fields. He was 28 years of age.

Army Register of Effects: His widow received £2 14s on 2nd February 1917 and a war gratuity of £8 10s on 11th October 1919.

 

 

Sergeant Walter Hall 1991

Killed in Action 13th October 1915

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Loos Memorial, France

Panels 42 to 44

Age 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of George Hall, Hinckley. Husband of Mrs Mary Ann Hall, 3 Brick Kiln Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley. Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 28th February 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 6TH NOVEMBER 1915

Sergeant Walter Hall of the 5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, whose wife lives at Brick Kiln Street, has been killed in action. News is to hand of the death of this soldier, who prior to mobilisation with the Territorials was employed in the clicking department of Messrs W and C Willa, Boot and Shoe Manufacturers, Trinity Lane. He is said to have met a terrible death being blown to pieces by a bursting shell. Writing to his widow, Private W Cooke, of the same regiment says that the late Sergeant Hall; “Died as he lived, a soldier and a man” and will be greatly missed by his comrades. The family with whom the deceased was billeted whilst training at Sawbridgeworth have written to the widow expressing their great sorrow, adding that they could not have met a better man, the deceased’s thoughts being continually for his wife and children. Another friend writes to say that Sergeant hall died a “True soldier”. The deceased as the son of Mr “Pullet” Hall and was highly respected. He leaves a widow and three children at 3 Brick Kiln Street.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow, then Mrs Mary Ann Smith received a payment of £4 9s 9d on 27th January 1916 and a war gratuity of £7 10s on 15th August 1919.

 

Private William Hall 38424

Killed in Action 14th April 1917

1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

Duisans British Cemetery, France

Plot 3 Row J Grave 37

Age 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Sheffield

Son of Mrs. Elizabeth Hall, Clarendon Road, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his mother at 42 the Lawns, Hinckley. He was a printer’s compositor and he had 2 siblings – George and Mabel.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 21ST SEPTEMBER 1918

After and adventurous and thrilling career in France, Private William Hall of the Northumberland Fusiliers, one of three soldier sons of Mrs. E Hall of Clarendon Road, Hinckley a former member of staff of the Hinckley Times, has fallen in action. The official notice states that his death took place on September 1st and further particulars are not yet to hand. Private Hall, who was aged 28 years, joined up under the Derby Scheme in 1916, prior to which time he worked in the composing room of the Hinckley Times office. As in civilian life, he performed his military duties conscientiously and well and amongst his colleagues regret is general that he was not spared to return home after the war. Always full of optimism, the deceased bore the hardships of active service with true soldierly courage. Readers will recall that he write many interesting letters to the Hinckley Times. In the last he stated that he was soon expecting to come home.

Army Registers of Effects: His sister Elizabeth J Lambert received a payment of £3 15s 6d on 6th September 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 10s on 21st October 1919. The record shows that he died in No 41 Casualty Clearing Station.

 

 

 

Private William Hall 38439

Killed in Action 1st September 1918

1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

HAC Cemetery, Ecoust St. Mein, France

Plot 1 Row B Grave 2

Age 29

Born Sheffield Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs Elizabeth Hall, Hinckley

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £14 5s 9d and a war gratuity of £11.

His name was originally missed of the memorial but was added in October 2005.

 

Private George Arthur Hames 37674

Killed in Action 6th April 1917

24th Battalion (Tyneside Irish) Northumberland Fusiliers

Anzin St Aubin British Cemetery, Arras, France

Plot 2 Row A Grave 5

Age 34 Born Tamworth Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Harry Hames and Mrs Annie Hames, 33 Charles Street, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 3 Charles Street, Hinckley with his parents and his occupation is described as Hosiery Counter Man. He had 3 siblings living at home – Harry, Clara and Arthur.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 26TH MAY 1917

News has been received at his home at 33 Charles Street, Hinckley, of the death in a Field Ambulance on May 4th, after six or seven hours of unconsciousness of Private George Arthur Hames of the Northumberland Fusiliers, who prior to joining up was employed at the hosiery warehouse of Messrs. G Bott and Sons, Hosiery Manufacturers. The deceased was a single man of 34 years and went to the Front about 12 months ago. Reports received by his relations states that he received a serious bullet wound and that he is buried in a British Cemetery in the suburb of a large French town near to the fighting that is currently taking place. He was a much respected member of Hinckley Liberal Club.

Army Registers of Effects: Payments were made to his brothers and sisters - Harry, Ellen, Clara, Elizabeth and John of £1 1s 15d on 14th August 1917. His brother Harry received a war gratuity of £3 10s on 21st October 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal Steward Hamill 240153

Died of Wounds 25th August 1918

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Fouquieres Churchyard Extension, France

Plot 4 Row E Grave 1

Age 20

Born Leicester Enlisted Hinckley

Nephew of Mrs Fray, Manor Street, Hinckley

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: he was living at 3 Bell Entry, Castle Street, Hinckley with the Bonnett family. He was employed in the Hosiery Trade – Stamping.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 27th February 195.

HINCKLEY TIMES 21ST SEPTEMBER 1918

While a party of men were cleaning their rifles behind the lines in France, Lance-Corporal Steward Hamill of the Leicestershire Regiment was accidentally shot through the temple, death being instantaneous. Hamill who was aged 20 years, went out to France with the Hinckley Territorials in the early days of the war, prior to which time he lived with his Aunt, Mrs Fray, in Manor Street, Hinckley. He worked for Messrs. Ney Bros (Boot Manufacturers), Barwell.

He had twice ben gassed and had only been back in the firing line two days before he met his death. Shortly afterwards, he would have come to Hinckley for a month’s leave following four years’ service.

Army Registers of Effects: His Aunt received a payment of £33 3s 4d on 31st May 1919 and a war gratuity of £19 10s on 3rd December 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal Leslie Joseph Harries 241111

Killed in Action 25th August 1918

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Fouquieres Churchyard Extension, France

Plot 4 Row E Grave 3

Age 22

Born Burbage Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Bernard Percival and Mrs Elizabeth Harries, 70 Castle Street, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 70 Castle Street, with his parents and was employed as a Draper’s Assistant. He had 4 siblings – Howard, Ethel, Edith and Ivy.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 21ST SEPTEMBER 1918

News has reached Hinckley of the death in action with the Leicesters on 25th August of Lance-Corporal Leslie Harries, son of Mr and Mrs B P Harries of Castle Street, Hinckley.

Writing to the bereaved Mother, Lieutenant K Ashdown, pays tribute to the character and worth of the deceased. “Nothing” he says “has given me as such mental pain for a long time as writing to you to let you know of the death of your son”. Lance-Corporal Harries who was 22 years of age joined the colours in the 2/5th Leicesters together with his brother in November of 1914.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £10 6s 1d on 9th December 1918 and a war gratuity of £18 on 2nd December 1919.

 

 

Lance-Corporal Arthur Harris 9820

Died of Wounds 1st August 1915

A Company 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Section 9 Grave 89

Born in Old Basford, Nottingham Enlisted in Leicester Living in Hinckley

Age 20

Son of Mr Arthur and Mrs Elizabeth Harris, Turner’s Row, Coventry Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. First went to France on 8th December 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES 7TH AUGUST 1915

We regret to state that Lance-Corporal Harris of the 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment has died in the King George Hospital, London, from wounds received in action on June 4th last. The sad intelligence was conveyed to his mother who lives in Turner’s Row, Coventry Road, on Monday last.

Lance-Corporal Harris was 21 years of age. He enlisted some two years ago and proceeding to France on December 4th last, saw much fighting. He was badly wounded in the head and after treatment in a military hospital in Boulogne was transferred to London. Last Friday it was necessary to perform another operation.

In a letter to the Rev. J F Griffiths, Vicar of Holy Trinity, the deceased stated that the following notice to his injuries had been placed above his bed: “The brain surface was loosely patched with a piece of gauze and the scalp flap was allowed to fall back into place”.

Harris added that his nerves were completely shattered and that he would only be fit for light work again. Before joining the army he was a shoehand, employed at the Boot and Shoe factory in Barwell of Messrs. Geary Bros.

Army Registers of Effects: The sum of £7 17s 1d was paid to his mother on 20th March 1916 and a war gratuity of £5 was paid to her on 4th September 1920.

 

Private William Harris 23706

Killed in Action 15th July 1916

8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, France

Pier 2 Face C Pier 3 Face A

Age 24

Born Old Basford, Notts Enlisted Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Son of Mr Arthur and Mrs Eliza Harris, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £11 7s 1d on 5th September 1917 and a war gratuity of £4 on 9th October 1919.

 

 

Private Charles Harris 36645

MILITARY MEDAL

Killed in Action 31st October 1918

9th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

Cross Roads Cemetery, Fontaine Au Bois, France

Plot 3 Row A Grave 20

Age 23

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Joseph and Mrs Elizabeth Harris, 16 ½ Manor Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Carter. He had 6 siblings – Maria, Jack, Lillian, Edwin, Joseph and Sidney.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star.

HINCKLEY TIMES

Private Charles Harris of the 9th Northumberland Fusiliers, as son of Mr J Harris, carter, of 16 ½ Manor Street, Hinckley was killed in action on 31st October last. Lieutenant Wilkinson writes to the bereaved Mother: “On October 24th your son became my servant owing to my own servant becoming a casualty and during the short time I had of becoming personally acquainted with him, I commenced to look on him as a real friend, for his cheerful disposition helped us all along, no matter how trying the circumstances were. In action I could always rely on him to do his duty as a man and upon the 25th October, I sent forward a recommendation for the work he did during our attack of 24th October for his example was truly an inspiration tom all taking part. His death took place during an attack on three houses occupied by the enemy at 10.45pm on October 31st. I shall never forget his last words to me before the attack, which were; “I know quite well sir you think this attack is awfully dangerous and so do I, but where you go, I go”. Can you wonder how everyone feels so deeply the loss of so true a soldier? We attacked the houses, only a small party of us, your son following closely at my heels. As I entered one house a machine gun opened fire, slightly wounding me in my left side and killing your son. The enemy was in too large a force and we had to withdraw, being unable to bring your son way on account of the heavy fire. He fell just before reaching bridge of the river Rhonelle. Another letter from Harold B Cartwright says: “He was the best pal anyone could wish to have. He was liked by everyone in the company and everyone wishes to convey their heartfelt sympathy. By this I think you will have recognised that the most terrible and yet the greatest honour any man can wish for happened. He was killed about three days ago fighting for King and Country. However, I would much rather have him here at my side. As you know he was a Lewis Gunner, but a day or two before he died he did a very brave deed in capturing some prisoners single handed. I think it was one of his platoon officers who saw him and recommended him and asked him to be his servant. Charlie was fed up with the gun and accepted the job. About three days ago and order was given for a strong machine gun post to be taken and his officer was to lead the attack. Of course, his servant and runner had to go with him and Charlie was killed by his side”. Captain W S Allen states: 2 I looked upon him as one of the best men in the company. He was always brave and reliable. He was recommended for a decoration and the award of the Military Medal has come through, which, in my opinion, he well deserved. I wish to convey the sympathy of the whole company to you in this trying time”.

The late Private C Harris who was 23 years of age before joining the army worked for his Father.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £9 9s 3d on 21st May 1919 and a war gratuity of £8 0n 9th December 1919.

 

 

Private Sidney Tom Harris 24761

Died of Wounds 28th September 1917

2/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Belgium

Plot 6 Row H Grave 8

Age 21

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Thomas and Elizabeth Harris, 19 Highfields Road, Hinckley.

Unitarian Chapel Memorial

United Reformed Church Memorial

S Davis and Sons Factory Memorial Scroll (now in Hinckley and District Museum; original in the Imperial War Museum)

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 62 Coventry Road, Hinckley and he was employed as a seamless hosiery hand. He had two sisters, May and Hilda.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar – October 1917

Private Sidney Harris, 2/5th Leicesters, was wounded on September 26th and died on the 28th at the Clearance Station, France. He was the only son of Mr and Mrs T Harris, 19 Highfields Road, and was twenty two years of age.

HINCKLEY TIMES 20TH OCTOBER 1917

Deaths Column…In Loving Memory of Private Sidney Harris,

                             Died of Wounds 28.9.1917 Wounded 26.9.1917

                             Leicestershire Regiment Aged 21 years

                             Parents and Sisters, Margaret and Hilda,

                             19 Highfields Road, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother was paid a sum of £3 1s 5d on 4th January 1918 and a war gratuity was paid also to her of £7 10s on 11th November 1919.

 

Private Harold Thomas Headley PO/1727(S)

Died of Wounds 26th October 1917

1st Battalion Royal Marines Light Infantry

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium,

Age 22

Son of Mr Thomas Headley and Mrs Jane Headley, 94 Rugby Road, Hinckley.

St Paul’s Church Memorial, Hinckley (Now in St. Mary’s Church, Hinckley)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 31 John Street and was employed as an Office Boy. He had 1 sibling –Gwendoline.

Service Record: He enlisted at Warwick on 11th December 1915. He was born in 1895. At the time of enlistment he is described as an Assistant Booking Clerk. He stood 5ft 3inches. He was placed on Reserve but called up to the Deal depot on 30th November 1916. In February 1917 he was allotted to the Victory Brigade, Royal Marines and on 16th March 1917 he joined the First Battalion Royal Marines. His character is consistently described as very good. His family received a war gratuity of£5 on 20thn September 1919.

HINCKLEY TIMES 17TH NOVEMBER 1917

Mr and Mrs Headley of 9 Holliers Walk, Hinckley, have been notified that their only son, Private Harold Thomas Headley, of the Royal Marines Light Infantry, died of wounds on October 26th. The deceased was so badly wounded that he died shortly after reaching the dressing station. He was 22 years of age.

At the time of enlisting in November of last year, Private Headley was engaged as a shell inspector at the munitions factory of Messrs. Herbert Ltd, Coventry. He was formerly employed as a fitter at Hinckley Gasworks and as a boy worked for Messrs. John Baxter and Sons at the Hinckley Times office.

 

 

Private Frederick Heward 16063

Died of Wounds 15th January 1917

9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Section 12 Grave 88

Born in Hinckley Enlisted in Hinckley

Age 35

Son of Mr George and Mrs Emma Heward, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Mary Rose Theresa Heward, 6 Rutland Avenue, Hinckley.

St. Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

He was a Scoutmaster for 2nd Hinckley St Peter’s troop.

1911 Census: He was a boarder, living at 5 Chessher Street, Hinckley. He was employed as a hosiery hand.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 29th July 1915.

Service Record

He enlisted on 18th November 1914 for the duration of the war. At the time he lived at 89 Clarendon Road, Hinckley and was aged 33 years and 10 months. He was appointed an unpaid Lance-Corporal whilst training at Aldershot on 15th February 1915 and then a paid Lance-Corporal on 22nd June 1915.He was deprived of his Lance-Corporal stripe on 8th December 1915 for misconduct in the field, the nature of which is not stated.

On 16th July 1916 he was wounded in action an admitted to the 64th Field Ambulance with a gunshot wound to the right leg. On the same day he was admitted to the 45th Casualty Clearing Station and on the 17th July he was evacuated to the 10th General Hospital at Rouen. On 20th July he was transferred to England on the hospital ship “W. Australia”. He spent 9 years with the Territorials prior to enlistment.

 

 

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – October 1915

Lance-Corporal Frederick Heward, of the 9th Leicesters, has been for some time engaged in the dangerous work of a sniper. Some letters recently received from him give some interesting details of the daily routine of trench life.

“We are not having very good weather out here as it keeps raining and is so cold at night. When we were going into the trenches (which we have taken over from the French), they were up to the shoe tops in sludge and water. I have got a champion little dugout to myself. In it is a nice little bedstead made of two poles and wire netting lapped around like a hammock, which is the best I have had since I have been out here. There are some little shelves on which to put the rations…..I think we have left civilisation altogether this time as all the villages are smashed up and no people are living anywhere about. We got to the trenches on Friday night, so I had my birthday in the trenches.  I am pleased to say that I knocked a German over just to keep it up. I caught him in a trench about 100 yards from ours and I gave him a couple of rounds….We had to go without tea on Saturday afternoon, as while we were serving it out a shell came and hit the parapet and filled the pot with earth. I was very sorry”.

From a further letter dated the 11th September, we cull the following extracts:

“We have been in the trenches eight days but expect to get relieved very shortly. I have had only one wash since we have been in and that was in the water I shaved with, as it is very scarce up here. We are only allowed one pint a day and we could drink that much! We had a bit of excitement last night when, after just receiving the order to “stand to” (when every man has to stand in his place in the trench), some of our men on the listening post spotted two Germans close to our wire entanglement and reported it. Here came my bit of luck for just as I was going down to see what the matter was, I was stopped at the entrance by the Sergeant. Whilst standing there (which was not a minute) the man I had sent down to tell the men to lie low, met them half way up the trench both wounded – one in the head and ear and the other in the neck with four or five bullet holes in his jacket; but thanks God none of the wounds are serious. If I had happened to be there is an off-chance that I (being a bit taller than the others) would have caught some of the bullets. One of the other men and me took their places and we kept our eyes open all night, as we did not know whether we had hit the Germans or not. We think they were going to throw bombs into our trench, so the officer sent me one down and told me to let them have it if I saw any of them again.; but the night went through without any more trouble…We came out of the trenches this morning and are now in some houses at the back of the firing line which had been smashed up by artillery. There is a church close by, but there is not much left of it – only the walls and the tower; the statues, pulpit and seats are all broken and lie scattered over the floor. Only the crucifix stands untouched on what remains of a wall and the figure is about seven feet high. We are staying in the village about a week.”

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – December 1916

Private Frederick Heward is making satisfactory progress at Morden Grange, a convalescent home at Mitcham, Surrey and a few miles out of London. He was wounded twice and his thigh broken but he is able to get about in a wheeled chair.

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – February 1917

Our list of casualties slowly grows and now we have the duty of adding the name of Private Frederick Heward (9th Leicesters) to our roll of the gallant dead. After publishing in our December number hopeful news of his recovery, the announcement of his death came as an unpleasant surprise.

Private Heward was seriously wounded by shrapnel while taking part in the memorable advance towards the German lines in July of last year and after receiving first aid attention, lay for two days in a shell hole until the stretcher bearers could get to him. He was brought over to the 4th London General hospital, where he lay with a shattered left thigh for three months and was then sent to a convalescent home to build up his strength for a serious operation in which a bone was to be straightened and plated. The latter was performed on Monday, the 15th and he died the same day, after regaining consciousness and receiving the last Sacraments.

The funeral took place at Hinckley on the following Saturday afternoon, the body being brought from London the same morning. A firing party attended from Glen Parva barracks, while others acted as bearers, preceding the cortege to the cemetery, where a large gathering of the townspeople had assembled. The widow, father and sister were the chief mourners and Father Michael conducted the obsequies at the conclusion of which three volleys were fired over the warrior’s grave and the “Last Post” impressively sounded by two buglers.

Private Heward was thirty-five years of age and was a convert to the Faith. He was considered a most efficient soldier and was one of the crack shots of the regiment. As a sniper he rendered invaluable service. Soon after the war broke out he left his trimming press at Sketchley Dyeworks in order to join Kitchener’s Army. He had been connected with the Hinckley Territorials for ten years and as a marksman on several occasions helped the local company to win the Burnaby Shield at Syston. He won several medals and many prizes and once topped the tradesman’s list in a competition at the Burbage Common range. While in training at Purham Downs, before leaving for France, he won a silver cup presented by the Captain of the company. Previous to enlisting he had for some time been Scoutmaster of St. Peter’s troop of scouts.

By his death Mrs. Heward suffers a triple bereavement, for within the last three or four months she has lost her husband and two brothers – the late Inspector Ambrose Hood, of the Leicester Police force and Mr. L Hood. To her we offer sincere sympathy and for them we pray: Requiescant in Pace

HINCKLEY TIMES 27TH JANUARY 1917

Another well-known Hinckley soldier has laid down his life for the great cause. Private Frederick Heward 16063 of the Leicesters was among the crackshots of the Hinckley Territorials. He was seriously wounded while taking part in the great advance in July of last year. He was brought over to a London hospital where he lay with a shattered left thigh for three months and was sent to a convalescent home to build up his strength for a serious operation in which a bone was to be straightened and plated. The latter was performed on Monday of last week and Heward died the same day after not regaining consciousness.

Heward, who left a widow but no children, was one of the crackshots of the regiment and as a sniper rendered invaluable service. Soon after the war broke out he left his trimming press at Sketchley Dyeworks in order to join Kitchener’s army. He had been connected with the Hinckley Territorials for 10 years and as a marksman on several occasions he helped the local company win the Burnaby Shield at Syston. He won several medals and prizes and once topped the tradesmen prize list in a competition at Burbage Common range.

While training at Purham Downs before leaving for France, he won a silver cup presented to him by the Captain of the company. Private Heward was 35 years of age and was regarded as one of the most efficient soldiers ever to be turned out by Hinckley. He was hit by shrapnel whilst advancing towards the German lines and after receiving first aid attention at the hands of Private W Branson, a Burbage youth, lay for two days in a shell hole until the stretcher bearers could get to him.

The military funeral took place at Hinckley on Saturday afternoon last, the body being brought from London the same morning. A firing party attended from the Glen Parva barracks while others attended as bearers, preceding the cortege to the Cemetery where a large gathering of townspeople had assembled. The young widow, father and sister were the chief mourners and Father Michael Browne of St Peter’s, Hinckley, conducted the service, at the end of which three vollies were fired over the warrior’s grave and the “Last Post” impressively sounded by the buglers.

Half a dozen members of the Hinckley Hosiery Trimmers’ Union, to whom the deceased belonged, were at the graveside as well as members of the Hinckley Volunteer Training Cops and a number of employees of Sketchley Dyeworks. The latter sent a very beautiful artificial wreath.

The widow has within the last three months lost her husband and three brothers, Inspector Ambrose Hood of the Leicestershire Police Force and Mr L Hood, landlord of the “Prince’s Feathers”, Rugby Road, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: The sum of £16 10s 11d was paid to his widow on 1st May 1917. A war gratuity of £9 was paid to the widow on 24th October 1919.

 

 

Private George Norman Hewer 1919

Died of Wounds 15th October 1915

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Fouquieres Churchyard Extension, France

Row 1 Grave 74

Age 18

Born Offchurch, Warks Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs Esther Norton (formerly Hewer), Stockwell Head, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 32 Stockwell Head with his mother and was still at school. He had 3 siblings – Violet, Lily and Gladys.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 18th August 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 6TH NOVEMBER 1915

An official communication states that Private George Norman Hewer of the 5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, a Hinckley youth has been killed in action in France. The deceased who would have been 19 years of age last Sunday met his death on October 15th. He was the only son of Mrs. Hewer, Stockwell Head, Hinckley, whose husband was killed in the South African war. Prior to being called up he worked at the Boot and Shoe Factory of Messrs. Geary Bros at Barwell. Hewer was an old scholar of St. Mary’s Day School. He went to France with his regiment in August.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £1 4s 3d on 24th January 1916 and a war gratuity of £4 10s on 31st July 1919.

 

Corporal Walter Shirley Herbert 17743

Died of Wounds 10th July 1916

6th Battalion Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment) formerly 14483 Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry

Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt L’Abbe, France

Plot 2 Row A Grave 28

Age 25

Born Hinckley Enlisted Birmingham Living Hinckley

Son of Mr John Walter Herbert and Mrs Edith Maud Herbert, Castlemain Villa, 33 Hill Street, Hinckley.

Hinckley Grammar School Memorial (now in Hinckley and District Museum)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Warehouseman. He had 2 siblings – Sidney and Edith.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 19th July 1915.

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Autumn Term 1916

“We also have to record the death of Corporal W S Herbert of the 6th Wilts Regiment. He joined the colours in September 1914 and after training at Salisbury Plain was sent to France. He took part in the Battle of the Somme being in charge of a machine gun section. While at school he was very keen on games and was a member of the Old Boy’s Cricket Club and the Corinthian’s Football Club. As a soldier he showed the same keenness in his duties, taking a special interest in gunnery. He was recommended for distinction and was shot by a sniper on July 9th, while making a machine gun emplacement.”

HINCKLEY TIMES 22ND JULY 1916

Another of the nine brave Hinckley lads who voluntarily enlisted to do their best in the time of our country’s difficulty on September 3rd 1914, in the early stages of the war, has “gone under” to a German sniper somewhere in France. We speak of Corporal Shirley Herbert of the 6th Wiltshire Regiment who died on Sunday 9thn July. From what we hear in the town and from his fighting comrades, Herbert seems to have been a popular fellow in the gun section with which he swerved.

Corporal Shirley Herbert was the elder son of Mr and Mrs J W Herbert of Castlemain Villa, Hill Street. He was an old boy of Hinckley Grammar School and worked in the hosiery business with his father in Hinckley for some years, afterwards being employed by Messrs. Buckler at the Albion Works, Leicester. When war broke out he, with eight other pals, enlisted in the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry. At the time the Regiment was very popular with the young men of the country. Indeed, the enlistments were so numerous that many recruits had to be transferred and the Hinckley lads thus proceeded to the 6th Battalion Wiltshire regiment. Corporal Herbert went to France on July 13th of last year and since that time has been in and out of the trenches without injury. He had one leave of several days in January last and came home to Hinckley with the mud of the trenches sticking to his boots.

During the present offensive the Wiltshires encountered some stiff fighting but Herbert went through without a scratch, until he was shot by a sniper.

Private T C Garner, one of the nine Hinckley Pals writing to his friends in Hinckley says: “ I am awfully sorry tom inform you of Shirley’s death which occurred on July 9th, at any rate I believe that it was this date. I will give you a few details. We were in the first attacks on July 2nd and managed to get out alright. On Wednesday we went into another, which was a very warm one and Shirley got through until we were consolidating. Then of course the snipers got busy and one caught him through the head. He did not die instantly. H Bott got him taken down to the dressing station and I believe he died there but as to the day, I cannot say for certain. It was a terrible blow to me as you may understand. We have been together since the gun section was formed and all the fellows worshipped him. It is not possible to tell what a great blow it is to them when they heard the news. All the section send their deepest sympathy to his relatives and his dear mother and father.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £3 7s 2d on 27th October 1916 and a war gratuity of £9 10s on 8th September 1919.

 

Private William Hill 20288

Died of Wounds 5th May 1917

8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Hinckley Cemetery

Section 3 Grave 217

Enlisted in Leicester Living in Hinckley

Age 34

Son of Mrs Jane Hill, 9 Manor Place, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: The record gives his occupation as a Trimmer. He had three brothers and one sister.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 22nd December 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 19TH MAY 1917

Private William Hill of the Leicesters, son of Mrs Hill, Manor Place, Hinckley, died in a military hospital at Devonport on May 5th from wounds received in action in France a few weeks previously. He had been in hospital a fortnight suffering from severe wounds to the head and legs caused by shrapnel.

The deceased was a single man, aged 34. He enlisted on June 1st 1915 and for the last 18months he had rendered good service in France. Before the war he was employed as a window cleaner. The body was brought to Hinckley and interred in the cemetery on Wednesday of last week. The Rev. J F Griffiths, Vicar of Holy Trinity, officiated. The coffin was covered with a Union Jack and was accompanied to the graveside by a party of soldiers from Glen Parva, who fired three vollies over the grave, while a bugler played the “Last Post”. A large number of friends and sympathisers attended as a witness to the internment.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received two payments - £2 13s 11d on 1st October 1917 and 7s on 19th November 1917. A war gratuity of £7 10s was paid to his mother on 12th November 1919.

 

 

Private Joseph Hincks 30181

Killed in Action 17th January 1917

9th Battalion Devonshire Regiment

Waggon Road Cemetery, Beaumont Hamel, France

Row B Grave 11

Age 37

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of the late Mr George Hincks and Mrs Dinah Hincks, 20 Derby Road, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Edith Hincks, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was a Clicker by trade and was living with his mother and sister – Mary Ann.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 3RD FEBRUARY 1917

The death occurred in action on the Somme on the night of January 17th of Private Joseph Hincks who joined up as a Derby recruit on May 1st. The deceased went through his training with the South Staffordshire regiment at Cannock but on arriving in France was transferred to the Devonshire Regiment. He was killed instantaneously by the bursting of a shell.

Private Hincks was 37 years of age and was one of Hinckley’s most successful amateur gardeners and as a regular contributor to the local flower show was invariably a conspicuous winner. He was an authority on Sweet Pea culture and his exhibits rarely found their equal in the district. His garden during the summer was a picture. The deceased was a married man and had been a member of Hinckley Liberal Club for many years, besides rendering useful service on the committee of Hinckley Sweet Pea and Rose Society.

Before joining the army he was a clicker in the shoe trade. By his death Messrs. Bailey and Simmonds have lost a most valuable workman. He is the youngest son of the late George and Dinah Hincks, 20 Derby Road, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £2 15s 11d on 26th April 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 22nd October 1919.

 

Private Walter Hinton 42692

Killed in Action 24th October 1918

11th Battalion Suffolk Regiment formerly M/318932 Royal Army Service Corps

Vendegies Cross Roads British Cemetery, Bermerain, France

Row A Grave 5

Age 19

Born Earl Shilton Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Alfred Hinton, Lime Kilns, Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 16TH NOVEMBER 1918

Mr and Mrs Hinton of White House, Lime Kilns, Hinckley, have been notified that their son Private W Hinton of the 11th Suffolks, was killed in action in France on October 24th at the age of 19 years.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £15 16s 3d on 20th August 1919 which included a war gratuity of £8.

 

Private Arthur Hiser 40576

Killed in Action 26th December 1917

2nd Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment formerly 3675 Leicestershire Regiment

Hermies Hill British Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row E Grave 3

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

His wife was Mrs Kate Hiser, Hinckley.

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living at 30 Mansion Street, Hinckley with his Grandparents, Mr Joseph Hiser and Mrs Charlotte Hiser. He worked in a Dye Works Store. He had 1 sibling – Annie.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of£7 18s 3d on 18th April 1918 and a war gratuity of £6 paid on 21st December 1919 and a further gratuity of £8 paid on 24th September 1920.

 

 

Private Ernest Hodges 240173

Killed in Action 11th October 1918

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Busigny Communal Cemetery Extension, France

Plot 4 Row A Grave 6

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 11 Grove Street, Hinckley with his parents Mr Frank Hodges and Mrs Jane Hodges. He was employed as a Hosiery Trimmer.

Medal Index Card:  Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 27th February 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: This record gives his mother’s name as Annie Pinchess who received a payment of £24 4s 4d on 22nd April 1919 and a war gratuity of £20 on 11th December 1919.

 

Private Thomas Alfred Hodgkinson 11409

Killed in Action 23rd January 1916

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

White House Cemetery, St. Jean les Ypres, Belgium

Plot 1 Row D Grave 7

Age 19

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs Clara E Moore, Coventry Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents Mr James Moore and Mrs Clara Moore at 68 Coventry Road, Hinckley. He was employed as a Seamless Hosiery Hand and he had 2 siblings – Shirley and Edith.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 7th April 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 19TH FEBRUARY 1916

News is to hand that private Thomas Hodgkinson of the 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, son of Mrs. Moore of Coventry Road, Hinckley, was killed by a German sniper in France, on the evening of Sunday January 23rd. Private W Taylor, of the deceased’s company said: “He was greatly respected by all who knew him and was ever willing to do his bit to make life happy and easy as he could for his comrades”. Taylor added: “He was a brave and noble son”.

Hodgkinson was 19 years of age and he enlisted in the Militia for three months in May 1914. Previous to that he was employed at the Tunnel Colliery at Nuneaton.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £4 10s 6d on 29th March 1916 and a second payment of 14/4d on 5th April 1916. She also received a war gratuity of £9 on 7th August 1919.

 

Private Sydney Thomas Holden 241036

Died of Wounds 18th May 1918

1/4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Fouquieres Churchyard Extension, France

Plot 3 Row A Grave 2

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley cemetery

Age 18

Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr James Holden and Mrs Alice Holden, Queens Road Nursery, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: He lived with his parents at the Queens Road Nursery. He was at school and had 9 siblings – Daisy, Florence, Lillian, Percy, Leonard, Harold, Arthur, Gladys and Phyllis.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 1ST JUNE 1918

Private Sydney Holden has died of wounds he received in action on May 19th. Private Holden 241036 lived in Querns Road, Hinckley. He was one of five brothers and was in the Leicestershire Regiment. He was the youngest son of Mr and Mrs J S Holden. The Rev H N Burton wrote and explained that he was in the front line with a Lewis Gun team and was severely wounded by a shell. He joined the Leicesters in 1915 when he was 16 years old.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £7 7s 6d on 26th August 1918 and a war gratuity of £16 10s on 28th November 1919.

 

Private William Hollick 52852

Died of Wounds 18th October 1918

7th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment

Rocquigny-Equancourt British Cemetery, Manancourt, France

Plot 4 Row D Grave 14

Age 30 Born Cosby Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Thomas and Mrs Sarah Hollick, London Road, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Alice E Hollick, Coventry Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at Crown Villa, 111 London Road, Hinckley. He was employed as a Hosiery Trimmer. He had 2 siblings – John and Louisa.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 23RD NOVEMBER 1918

Formerly a prominent member of Hinckley Church Lads Brigade, of which he was a Sergeant, Private William Hollick of the East Yorks Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Hollick, London Road, Hinckley, has died from wounds received in action on October 17th at the age of 30 years. His widow and two little boys live in Coventry Road.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £8 7s 7d on 3rd April 1919 which included a war gratuity of £5

 

Private Wilfred Ernest Holt 240199

Killed in Action 25th August 1918

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment Fouquieres Churchyard Extension, France

Plot 4 Row E Grave 2

Age 21

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Herbert Holt and Mrs Elizabeth Holt, Wharf Street, Leicester.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 19 Queens Road, Hinckley with his parents. He was employed as an Office Clerk. He had 4 siblings – Hilda, Edwin, Clarence and Eric.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and Territorial Force War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £35 6d on 18th November 1918 and a war gratuity of £18 10s on 29th December 1919.

 

 

 

 

Gunner Walter Holt 51125

Killed in Action 13th October 1915

65th Trench Mortar Battery Royal Garrison Artillery

Loos Memorial to the Missing, France

Age 22 Born Hinckley Enlisted Nuneaton Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Joseph Holt and Mrs Phoebe Holt, 146 Queens Road, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 146 Queens Road, Hinckley with his parents. He was employed as a Dyer Drier. He has 1 sibling – Elizabeth.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 2nd August 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 30TH OCTOBER 1915

Gunner Walter Holt 51125 of the Royal Garrison Artillery was killed in action on 13th October. He was 22 years of age and prior to enlistment in November last, he was employed at Sketchley Dyeworks, where he had held a situation for the last eight years. He was a son of Mr and Mrs Holt of 146 Queens Road, Hinckley and his death is much regretted by his friends locally. The deceased went out to France in August. Writing to the bereaved parents, Rev P A Stewart of the 61ST Field Ambulance 25th Division says: “It is with great sorrow that we have to inform you of the death of your son 51125 Gunner Walter Holt 38th Company RGA on Wednesday last, October 13th. His death was instantaneous. He was with a trench mortar party which was struck by a German shell during bombardment. It is very difficult to know how to comfort you in your great loss but it will be some comfort and consolation to you to know that your son died at his post of duty. I buried your son and a comrade just behind the fire trench shortly after the bombardment. Their graves will be marked by crosses. May the God of all comfort you and all to whom your son was dear and give you strength to bear his loss bravely”.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £5 8s 10d on 15th January 1916 and a war gratuity of £3 on 3rd September 1919.

 

Private Arthur Edwin Hopewell 13083

Died 25th October 1918

9th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Cologne Southern Cemetery, Germany

Plot 5 Row J Grave 4

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census:  He was living at 26 Victoria Street, Hinckley with his parents, Mr Thomas Hopewell and Mrs Elizabeth Hopewell. He was employed as a Hosiery Trimmer. He had 2 siblings – Hannah and Gertrude.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 29th July 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother. Mrs Elizabeth Hopewell, received a payment of £74 14s on the 17th November 1919, which included a war gratuity of £24.

 

Private Stanley Hopkins 25707

Killed in Action 2nd October 1917

8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Age 21

Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mrs Ellen Hopkins, 77 Factory Road, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: he was living at 28 New Street, Hinckley with his Aunt, Mrs Charlotte Hutt and was employed as a Runner On – Hosiery Trade.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He attested on 29th February 1916. He stood 5ft 5inches. He was posted to the 8th battalion on 15th October 1916. He joined his unit in the field on 26th November 1916. He was admitted to the 64th Field Ambulance with Boils on 14th March 1917 and then to the 16th Field Ambulance on 17th March 1917 with the same complaint.

HINCKLEY TIMES 10TH NOVEMBER 1917

Private Stanley Hopkins of the Leicesters was killed in action on October 1st. He was the son of Mr and Mrs Hopkins, 77 Factory Road, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £1 14s 4d on 6th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £7 on 21st November 1919.

 

Sergeant Alfred Hough 426094

Killed in Action 30th November 1917

89th Field Ambulance Royal Army Medical Corps (Territorial) attached 1st Battalion Essex Regiment

Cambrai Memorial to the Missing, France

Panel 13

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Born Gorton, Manchester Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

1911 Census: He was boarding with Mrs Ann Hollier at 57 Mount Road, Hinckley. He was employed as a Pharmacist.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star.

Service Record: He enlisted on 3rd April 1915 and was living in the Market Place. He was described as a widower. His Mother, Annie Logan, lived at Lord Street, Mansfield. He first served at the 5th Northern General Hospital in Leicester from 3rd April 1914. He was promoted Sergeant on 6th April 1915. He first went to France on 14th March 1916. He lived at 60 Hill Street, Hinckley. He had a daughter Miss Florence Joan Hough who was in the care of a Guardian - Mr Thomas King of 37 Hill Street, Hinckley, who received a separation allowance of 7/- for the child.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother, given as Annie Logan, received a payment of £37 18s 5d on 27th June 1918 and a war gratuity of £14 10s on 28th November 1919.

 

 

 

Corporal John Hoult 34745

Killed in Action 29th September 1917

11th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire) Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Age 28

Born Leicester Enlisted Derby Living in Hinckley

Son of Mr and Mrs. Alfred Hoult, 17 Victoria Street, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs. Ellen Florence Hoult, 9 Mill View, Hinckley.

Unitarian Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living as a boarder, along with his wife and son, Alfred Hoult, with the Blakesley family at 13 Victoria Street, Hinckley. His occupation is given as coal miner. He was aged 19 years and his wife was aged 22 years.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar – December 1917

Corporal Jack Hoult, Notts and Derbys Regiment, aged 26, an old scholar, is officially reported killed in France. From the School and Chapel we extend our deep sympathy to his widow and two children,

living at 12 Victoria Street, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £13 10s 8d on 21st November 1918 and a war gratuity of £8 on 1st December 1919.

 

Driver Leonard Gilles Houvert 1181

Killed in Action 26th August 1917

B Company 108th Brigade Royal Field Artillery

Flat Iron Copse Cemetery, Mametz, France

Plot 9 Row 1 Grave 5

Born Rothersthorpe, Northants Enlisted Nuneaton

Husband of Mrs Ellen Houvert, Cox’s Abbey, Upper Castle Street, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 64 Woodland Road, Burbage with his Mother Mrs Hannah Houvert and was employed as a painter. He had 5 siblings – George, Harry, Lillian, Walter and May.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 31st August 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 21ST SEPTEMBER 1917

Driver Leonard Houvert of the Royal Field Artillery was killed in action in France on August 26th. His wife lives at Cox’s Abbey, Upper Castle Street, Hinckley and his mother was a former resident of Burbage. He joined the army at the outbreak of the war, prior to which time he was working as a miner at the Charity Pit, Nuneaton. In a letter of sympathy the Rev T H Bailey says that the whole affair was most unfortunate. A large shell exploded right on top of a gun limber as it was standing by ready to move and eight other fellows were killed. Death was instantaneous.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £9 11s 4d on 2nd December 1918 and a war gratuity of £19 on 1st December 1919.

 

Private Benjamin Howard 270214

Killed in Action 26th August 1917

5/6th Battalion The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) formerly 5192 Highland Light Infantry

Hargricourt British Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row D Grave 32

Age 19

Born Ilkeston, Derbyshire Enlisted Hinckley Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Allen Howard and Mrs Fanny Howard, 18 Mount Road, Hinckley.

Hinckley Grammar School Memorial (now in Hinckley and District Museum)

1911 Census: He lived in Priesthills Road, Hinckley with his parents and 1 sibling – Thomas.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He attested on 6th June 1916 and was mobilised on 26th October 1916 and his address at that time was Station Road, Hinckley. He was aged 18 at enlistment. He was initially posted to the 2/7th Battalion Highland Light Infantry and was transferred to the Royal Scots on 18th June 1917. He had a brother Thomas and a sister Hilda Florence. His religion was given as Church of England. He first went to France on 3rd June 1917 disembarking at Boulogne and he proceeded to the 21st Infantry Base Depot at Etaples on 4th June 1917. He joined his unit in the field on 21st June 1917. His Father was sent back some personal effects: letters, photos, a religious book and cards.

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine – Autumn Term 1917

Ben Howard (1910 – 1912). He was born at Ilkeston, February 3rd 1898, joined the army in October 1916. He was enrolled at Danbury, in the Highland Light Infantry, was sent to Naas, near Dublin, to complete his training and after a brief stay at his regimental headquarters at Galway, was sent to France during Whit week 1917 and there drafted into the Royal Scots. He was killed in Action on August 26th 1917. He was aged 19.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father Allen received a payment of £1 19s 11d on 15th January 1918 and his Mother received a war gratuity of £3 on 25th November 1919.

 

Henry Walter Howkins

Discharged Soldier – Civilian Death

1911 Census: He was living with his parents Mr Frederick Howkins and Mrs Jane Howkins at 19 John Street, Hinckley and was a Hosiery Warehouse Boy. He had 1 sibling - Frederick.

Service Record: He attested on 16th February 1916 and was mobilised on 112th May 1916 He initially went to Glen Parva but was posted to the C Company 2/6th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment on 18th May 1916.. He was employed as a Hosiery Counterman. He was discharged from his unit on 13th October 1916 being considered medically unfit for military service.

HINCKLEY TIMES 5TH MAY 1917

Following a lingering illness the death has taken place at his home at 19 John Street, Hinckley, of Henry Walter Howkins, who formerly served in the South Staffordshire Regiment. The deceased who was in his 20th year, enlisted in May of last year and was sent out to Ireland with the south Staffordshire Regiment, in connection with the Irish disturbances. He was discharged on October 13th last, owing to ill health. In recent years he was employed by Messrs. Mason and Blakesley, Hosiery Manufacturers. He was much respected by his employers and his fellow workpeople. He is the son of Mr and Mrs Howkins, of the same address.

 

Private John Thomas Hubbard 20224

Died 21st March 1918

2/6th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Bay 7 and 8

Born Peatling Parva Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living in Leicester at 2 Court N Northgate Street and was a Coal Carter. He and his Wife, Minnie, had three children – Florence, Ellen and Alice.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Wife received a payment of £12 17s 9d on 10th June 1919 which included a war gratuity of £11 10s.

His name was originally missed of the Hinckley War Memorial but was added in October 2005

 

Private Robert Hudson 252467

Died 10th December 1918

D Company 3rd Battalion Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

Hinckley Cemetery

Section 2 Grave 240

Age 49

Husband of Mrs Mary Jane Hudson, 3 Baines Lane, Hinckley

1911 Census: He lived at 3 Kemps Yard, Bond Street, Hinckley and he was occupied as a labourer and bricklayer. There were four children living at home – George, Samuel, Alfred and Emily.

Medal Card Index: He was a discharged soldier, leaving the army on 7th October 1918. He had enlisted on 29th April 1915. He received the Victory Medal and British War Medal.

 

Private Ernest Humphrey 241869

Killed in Action 30th April 1917

2/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Jeancourt Communal Cemetery Extension, France

Plot 2 Row C Grave 14

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley cemetery

Age 23

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr William Humphrey and Mrs Clara Ellen Humphrey, 7 Albert Road, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 7 Albert Road and was employed as a Warehouseman. He had 3 siblings – William, Ellen and Daniel.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £7 7s 7d on 31st July 1917 and a war gratuity of £5 on 10th November 1919.

 

Private William Humphrey 22867

Killed in Action 16th April 1917 at Monchy

1st Battalion King’s Own Scottish Borderers

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Bay 6

He was the eldest brother of the above and is mentioned in the register entry for the above.

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley cemetery.

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living with his parents Mr William Humphrey and Mrs Clara Ellen Humphrey at 7 Albert Road and was employed as a Warehouseman – Shirts and Pants. He had 3 siblings – Ernest, Ellen and Daniel.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £2 2s 7d on 23rd October 1917 and a war gratuity of £5 10s on 25th October 1919.

 

Private Bertram Gilbert Humphreys 205662

27th December 1918

2nd Garrison Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment formerly Middlesex Regiment

Delhi Memorial Buried in Karachi Cemetery

Age 28

Son of Mr William Humphreys and Mrs Sarah Annie Humphreys, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 9 Church Walks with his parents and was employed as a Dry Cleaner in a Dyeworks. He had 2 siblings – Wilfred and Dorothea.

Medal Index Card: British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £35 2s 1d on 27th August 1919.

 

 

Private Sidney Charles Hurst 9287

Died of Wounds 16th April 1916

3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards

Brandhoek Military Cemetery, Vlamertinghe, Belgium

Plot 2 Row B Grave C

Age 22

Born Leicester Enlisted Leicester

Son of Mr E and Mrs Eliza Hurst, 49 Dares Walk, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He lived with his mother at 49 Dares Walk and was employed as a Seamless machine operator. He had 3 siblings –May, Ellen and William.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star (with clasp). He first went to France on 12th August 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES 6TH MAY 1916

Mrs E Hurst of 49 Dares Walk, Hinckley, has been officially notified that her son Private Sidney Charles Hurst of the 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards died in a Field Ambulance on April 16th from wounds received in action.

The following letter has been received by Miss Hurst (sister) from the Rev A Llewellyn Jones, the Church of England Chaplain to the 3rd Brigade of Guards; “I know that delay is often inevitable in getting official news through and this may be the first knowledge you have about the sad news of your brother 9827 Pte. S Hurst but I know that the suspense is often wore than the worst news and so I write to you at once that you may be all help and comfort to your mother that you can. Tour brother came down badly wounded to a field ambulance yesterday and very soon died of his wounds. I was holding a service near the field ambulance and was told of his death and was asked to take the last service over him and lay his body to rest in a soldiers’ cemetery nearby. This I did and now his body lies with many other brave fellows who have given their lives in this tremendous struggle for freedom and right. The cemetery is at a little place called Brandhoek between Vlamertinghe and Poperinghe. It was an impressive service, aeroplanes flying overhead, the sun shining, the birds singing and yet I was called upon to lay these brave lads to rest and think of the sorrowing hearts at home. There were many officers and men present at the service. It was good to see our brave men honoured thus and a help to bring comfort to those at home. The message of Easter, will, coming at this time help to bring comfort to those at home and help you all in this time of sorrow”. Private Hurst was 22 years of age. He enlisted on October 19th 1911, previously working at the hosiery factory of Messrs. Atkins Bros, Hinckley. He was wounded last September.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £17 2s 5d ion 2nd October 1916 and a war gratuity of £90 10s on 14th August 1919.

 

William A Hurst

Unit not traced

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley

Brother of the above.

1911 Census: He was living with his Mother at 49 Dares Walk and was employed as a Seamless Machine operator. He had 3 siblings – May, Ellen and Sidney Charles.

 

Lance–Corporal Walter A Hurst 38453

Died 21st March 1918

1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Bay 2 and 3

Age 33

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living at 78 Druid Street, Hinckley, boarding with a Mr and Mrs Friswell. He was employed as a Shoe Hand.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His brothers, Samuel, William and George received payments of £8 19s 2d on 20th August 1919 which included a share of the war gratuity of £11.

 

Rifleman William Hurst 47604

Killed in Action 24th March 1918

2nd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles formerly 32080 Leicestershire Regiment

Pozieres Memorial to the Missing, France

Panels 74 and 75

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father, Mr William Hurst received a payment of £12 3s 11d on 17th October 1919 which included a war gratuity of £9.

 

 

Driver Thomas Hydon 240674

Killed in Action 4th April 1918

C Battery 92nd Brigade Royal Field Artillery

Pozieres Memorial, France

Age 33

Born in Hinckley Enlisted in Hinckley

Husband of Mrs K Hydon, Queens Park, Hinckley.

Unitarian Memorial

1911 Census: He was living at 2 Coventry Road, Hinckley and was married to Keziah Hydon. They had two children – Arthur George (4 years) and Ethel Hydon (1 year). His occupation is given as Boot sewer.

Medal Card Index:Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar – May 1918

It grieves us to record that our dear friend Thomas Hydon, aged 33 years, lost his life in France on Thursday, April 4th. He was a driver in the Field Artillery and was killed while bringing up ammunition across a shell swept area. In his death our church has suffered a great loss. His loyalty and devotion to our cause, in his early life with the work of our Sunday School and later as a member of the Chapel Committee, sidesman and worshipper, had bound him closely to us as a congregation. His quiet, unassuming yet ever cheerful presence will be missed in all our friendly gatherings and general activities. Having the welfare of our church at heart, he was always loyal and ready for his share of the work. With his widow and two children living at 1 Queens Park, we mourn his untimely death and to them and the many relatives we extend from the School and Chapel our very sincere sympathy. A Memorial service was held in the Chapel on Sunday April 21st.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £9 18s 6d on 9th August 1918 and a war gratuity of £ on 25th November 1919.

 

Private Joseph Iliffe 267136

Killed in Action 14th October 1918

19th Battalion (Tyneside Pioneers) Northumberland Fusiliers

Hooge Crater Cemetery, Belgium

Plot 14 Row H Grave 10

Age 32

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester

Son of Mr George Iliffe and Mrs Ellen Iliffe, New Plough Hotel, Leicester Road, Hinckley.

St Paul’s Church Memorial (now in St. Mary’s Church, Hinckley)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at the New plough Hotel and was employed as a Seamless Hosiery hand. He had 1 sibling – Walter.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £18 14s 9d on 23rd June 1919 and a war gratuity of £1 10s on 10th December 1919.

 

Private F Ingram 9831

Killed in Action 25th April 1915

1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Panel 8

Born Warwick Enlisted Warwick

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Husband of Mrs Daisy Ingram.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star (with clasp). He first went to France on 22nd August 1914.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £9 7s 7d on 22nd November 1915 and a war gratuity of £5 on 6th August 1919.

 

Sapper Charles Jacques 224833

Died of Wounds 14th April 1918

121st Field Company Royal Engineers formerly 46291 Yorkshire Regiment

Nesle Communal Cemetery, France

Row B Grave 33

Age 39

Born Shepshed Enlisted Hinckley

He was the son of Mr R B Jacques, Hurst Road, Hinckley and had three brothers and three sisters. Husband of Mrs Edith Jacques, Upper Castle Street, Hinckley

St. Peter’s Roman Catholic Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at Coronation Buildings, Hinckley with his wife and their son Maurice. He was employed as a plasterer.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He married Edith Gertrude Hutchinson on 22nd October 1902. He had two children Maurice (born 21st June 1909) and Henry Cyril (born 15th September 1911). He attested on 11th December 1915 and was mobilised on 4th January 1917. He was posted to the Royal Engineers. He was briefly transferred to the Yorkshire and Lancashire regiment on 10th September 1917 but was transferred back on 30th January 1918. He was posted to the Royal Engineers Base Depot from where he joined the 121st Field Company on 22nd February 1918. He was reported wounded and missing on 27th March 1918. He died whilst a Prisoner of War from wounds received in action – he was shot in the knee. His wife was awarded a pension of 25/5d per week for herself and the two children from 17th February 1919. She had received a separation allowance of 29/- and an allotment of pay of 7/7d.

HINCKLEY TIMES 9TH NOVEMBER 1918

After being wounded since March 27th last it is reported that Sapper Charles Jacques of the Royal Engineers, a well-known Hinckley plasterer is now reported to have died of wounds whilst a prisoner of war in a field hospital at Nesle. He is stated to have been buried in the cemetery of Honor Nesle Grain. He leaves a widow and two sons who reside in Upper Castle Street.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £12 15s 6d on 29th March 1919 which included a war gratuity of £7.

 

P R Jacques

No Trace

 

Lance-Corporal William Jeffs 9415

Killed in Action 25th October 1914

D Company 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium

Age 19

Born Sapcote Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Son of Mr John Jeffs and Mrs Mary Jeffs, 61 Duke Street, Hinckley.

Methodist Chapel Memorial, Sapcote, Leics.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living in Sapcote with his parents and was employed as a Signaller for Engine. He had 4 siblings – Evelyn, Kathleen, Albert and John.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 6TH NOVEMBER 1916

After having been missing for over 12 months a communication this week has been received from a comrade whom is a prisoner of war at Gottingen camp in Germany, stating that Lance Corporal W Jeffs 9415 of 1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment, a Hinckley man, was shot through the head and was last seen in a kneeling position in a dug out near Bois Grenier in France. The communication comes from Private Hunter, 1st battalion Leicestershire Regiment who was unfortunately taken prisoner. The War Office writing to Mr and Mrs Jeffs at 61 Duke Street states that it is feared that the statement of Private Hunter is correct and that the acceptance of Jeff’s death for official purposes is under consideration. Jeffs was 20 years of age. Before joining the army he was employed in the quarries of the Mountsorrel Granite Company at Stoney Stanton. He was his parents’ oldest son.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £7 16s on 19th January 1916 and a war gratuity of £5 on 14th July 1919.

 

Private George Jennings 31287

Killed in Action 6th October 1917

7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Bedford House Cemetery, Enclosure No 4, Belgium

Plot 9 Row 1 Grave1

Husband of Mrs Caroline Jennings, 29 Mansion Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 29 Chessher Street, Hinckley and was employed as a Brick Maker. He had two children – Winifred and Sarah.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 1st DECEMBER 1917

Private George Jennings of the Leicestershire Regiment was killed in France in action on October 5th. He leaves a widow and two children who live at 29 Mansion Street, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £2 2s 6d on 25th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £5 on 5th February 1920.

 

Private Gordon Jennings 11873

Died of Wounds 10th February 1915

3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards

Wimereux Communal Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row C Grave 30

Age 20

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley on 3rd September 1914

Son of Mr and Mrs Jennings, 57 Derby Road, Hinckley.

Unitarian Chapel Memorial

1911 Census: Living at 57 Derby Road, Hinckley and employed as a Hosiery Maker. His parents were William and Fanny Jennings. He had one sister Ethel (23) and three brothers Stanley (21), William (19) and Dudley (13)

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first arrived in France on 22nd January 1915.

In a house renovation in Charles Street, bricked up in the chimney was the pay-book of Gordon Jennings, giving his age at enlistment of 20 years and 67 days. He signed up for service in the Army for 3 years and 9 years in the Reserve. The physical description given of him indicates blue eyes, a fair complexion and dark brown hair.

Great Meeting Chapel – Calendar – March 1915

We much regret to record the death of Private Gordon Jennings of the 4th Battalion Coldstream Guards, who died in the Anglo-British Hospital at Wimereux, France on February 10th from wounds received in action the previous day.

We of the Church and Sunday school extend our sympathy to his sorrowing parents who reside at 57 Derby Road.

HINCKLEY TIMES 20TH FEBRUARY 1915

We much regret to record the death this week of two more Hinckley heroes. Private Gordon Jennings 11873 of the 4th Battalion Coldstream Guards died in the Anglo-French hospital at Winnicreux (France) on February 19th from wounds received whilst in action the previous day.

Jennings was 20 years of age and until September of last year, resided with his parents, Mr and Mrs Jennings  at 57 Derby Rod, being at the time a hosiery hand in the employment of Messrs Mason and Blakesley. A finely built fellow, he was well known locally and news of his death has caused much regret. He came home for a few days leave at Christmas and left for the Front towards the latter part of January. It is thought that he met his death in the fighting around La Bassee.

Army Registers of Effects: Gives his place of death as Rawalpindi Hospital, Boulogne. His Father, William received a payment of £2 13s 9d on 28th May 1915. He also received a war gratuity for his son of £5 on 2nd July 1919.

 

Private Stanley Jennings 53472

Killed in Action 3rd May 1917

D Company 15th Battalion Durham Light Infantry formerly 28005 Leicestershire Regiment

Arras Memorial, France

Age 29

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living in Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Son of Mr William and Mrs. Fanny Jennings, Charles Street, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Alice E Jennings, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was single and living with his parents, William and Fanny Jennings at 57 Derby Road, Hinckley. He had a sister Ethel and three brothers, William, Gordon and Dudley.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He enlisted on 26th February 1916 at Hinckley and was given a living at 167 London Road, Hinckley. His occupation was given as a Hosiery Hand. He stood 5ft 9ins and his wife was Alice Esther Jennings, nee Duckett. They had married on 3rd September 1914. His two children were Marjorie, born on 31st March 1915 and Gordon Stanley born on 3rd December 1916. He had an initial battlefield burial on 17th May 1917 after at first being designated missing in action. His mother wrote to the Infantry Records Office from 4 Charles Street, Hinckley on May 29th requesting information about her son, from whom she had not heard for 5 or 6 weeks.

He was originally posted to the 11th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment at Rugeley Camp and was promoted to Acting Lance-Corporal on 23rd June 1916. On the 1st September 1916 he was transferred to the 9th Training Reserve Battalion. On the 24th December 1916 at Etaples in France he was transferred to the 15th Battalion Durham Light Infantry where upon he reverted to the rank of Private.

His widow was sent his final effects – photos, cards and a wallet. The record states that he had two brothers, Will living at 14 Alma Road and Dudley living at 4 Charles Street. He has three sisters, Elizabeth Rowley, living in Derby Road, Ethel Simmonds living in Ten Foot, Factory Road and Helen Owens living in Ashby Road.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar – July 1917

We regret to announce that Private Stanley Jennings, Durham Light Infantry, was killed in action in France on the 3rd May 1917. He was twenty seven years of age and he leaves a widow and two children to mourn his loss. They reside at 168 London Road, Hinckley. Our deep sympathy from Church and School goes out to her and her little ones, and also to the parents, Mr and Mrs Jennings of 4 Charles Street, in this their second bereavement. Their son, Private Gordon Jennings, who died of wounds in France in February 1915, was the first of our men to lose his life in the war.

HINCKLEY TIMES 30TH JUNE 1917

Private Stanley Jennings of the Lewis Machine Gun Section of the Durham Light Infantry, was killed in action in France on May 3rd. He is the son of Mr and Mrs Jennings of Charles Street, Hinckley and he leaves a widow and two children.

Army Registers of Effects: The widow received a payment of 10s 4d on 19th October 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 10s on 30th October 1919.

 

Private Matthew Johnson 15234

Killed in Action 9th August 1915

G Company 9th Platoon 6th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment

Helles Memorial to the Missing, Turkey

Age 26

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Frederick Johnson and Mrs Mary Ann Johnson, 16 Albert Road, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Hosiery Hand Porter. He had 4 siblings – Sarahann, Ellen, Edith and Lillian.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to the Gallipoli Peninsular on 14th July 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 4TH SEPTEMBER 1915

The 26th Hinckley man to fall for his country is Private Matthew Johnson of the 6th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment (Pioneers) who prior to the war was employed in the sorting department at Sketchley Dyeworks.

Private Johnson, who was 26 years of age was the son of Mr and Mrs F Johnson of 16 Albert Road and the news of his death came as a great shock to his many friends and relations. He joined the East Yorks Regt on November 9th of last year. Previously he had served four years in the local Territorials. Towards the end of June his regiment left England for the Dardanelles and it was shortly after taking part in the historic landing at Suvla Bay on August 19th that he was shot in the head.

The deceased soldier was a prominent member of the Hinckley Liberal Club and was generally popular fellow whose death will be deeply regretted. He had worked at Sketchley Dyeworks since he was a youth of 16 years of age.

Writing to the bereaved parents, Pte. E Chadwick, a soldier friend of the deceased who is lying in the Royal Southern Hospital in Liverpool says: “I was sorry to hear that I was the first to tell you of Matt. There was not one in the company who did not respect him. We belonged to the party that made the landing at Suvla bay and we had to take the Turk by surprise at 2 o’clock in the morning. As soon as we got onto the beach they were waiting for us, so there was a bayonet charge by one part of our brigade. After that we had to take the first hill called Hill Ten. We went over that hill and dug ourselves in for the night but the next morning there was a terrible row. They started shelling with shrapnel, so we had to move to a place called Chocolate Hill. We had a fight there and then we had to lay low as there were no reinforcements near. It was then that the snipers began firing away at us. They got our Captain and a few more so we moved to the worst place of the whole lot by swinging around to the left by another hill. It was while defending there that Private Johnson got hit. I could not say which side the shot came from but I think it was the right. The sniper’s bullet caught him right in the head. It made us all want to find the sniper but finding them is a difficult job as they are the colour of the trees. Matt was crying for about three quarters of an hour and then he collapsed. You could not get anything out of him as he was hit badly but he died a hero, a man never to be forgotten by his mates”.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £2 15s on 24th January 1916 and a war gratuity of £3 on 27th July 1919.

 

 

Private Samuel Johnson 41059

Killed in Action 31st May 1917

4th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Bay 6

Age 19

Enlisted Hinckley Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Henry Johnson and Mrs Elizabeth Johnson, 57 Rugby Road, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Butcher’s Errand Boy. He had 1 sibling – Elsie.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES – In Memoriam Notice

Private Samuel Johnson   Aged 19

He fought and died in a foreign land

No loved ones near to take his hand

Not even close his pleading eyes

Miles away from his home he lies

Mother, Father and Sister, 57 Rugby Road, Hinckley

I often think of you dear one

If not with outward show

For those who mourn sincerely

Mourn silently and low

Emma

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £2 4d on 15th October 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 28th January 1919.

 

Private William Johnson 43805

Died of Wounds 15th October 1917

8th Battalion Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry formerly 185360 Royal Field Artillery

Menin Road South Cemetery, Belgium

Plot 3 Row L Grave 9

Born North Newbold, Yorks Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs. Jane Mills (formerly Johnson), Dog and Gun, Leicester

1911 Census: He was living in Mount Road, Hinckley and his occupation was as a groom for the Ward family.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar – November 1917

Pte. William Johnson, 8th K.O.Y.L.I., died of shell wounds at a Field Hospital in France on Monday October 15th. He was thirty-three years of age and leaves a widow who resides at 66 Derby Road.

HINCKLEY TIMES 10TH NOVEMBER 1917

Mrs. W Johnson of 66 Derby Road has received official news of the death from wounds received in action on October 15th of her husband Private W Johnson.

Army Registers of Effects:  His widow received two payments of £2 9s 4d ion 28th January 1918 and 13s 10d on 23rd March 1918. She was paid a war gratuity of £3 10s on 19th November 1919.

 

Private Frank Jones 11764

Died of Wounds 15th July 1916

7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Daours Communal Cemetery Extension, France

Plot 2 Row C Grave 19

Age 23

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living in Birmingham

Son of Mr Charles E and Mrs Jones, Burbage; brother of Mrs Payne, Ashby Road, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Unitarian Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first landed in France on 29th July 1915.

Great Meeting Chapel – Calendar – September 1916:

Private Frank Jones of the 7th Leicesters was a member of our Sunday School up to the time his family left this town. He joined the forces in September 1914 and died of wounds received in the July offensive, 1916.

HINCKLEY TIMES JULY 1916

News is to hand that Private Frank Jones of the 8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment who before the war was employed as a burner at the brick yard of Messrs. Hudson and Co, has died of wounds received on the 15th July. Son of Mr and Mr C E Jones of Burbage, he was the brother of Mrs Payne of Ashby Road, with whom he lived. He enlisted on 22nd September 1914 and has been in France for 12 months or so. He was so badly injured that he succumbed to his wounds the same day. He is thought to have succumbed in the same action as Corporal Clarke and Private Wheatley.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £3 17s 9d on 10th October 1916. He also received a war gratuity of £8 10s on 20th September 1919.

 

Guardsman George Bailey Jones 28017

Died of Wounds 1st August 1917

3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards

Mendinghem Military Cemetery, proven, Belgium

Plot 3 Row E Grave 5

Age 34

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs Rose Jones, 33 Thorneycroft Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was employed as a Hosiery warehouseman.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 18TH AUGUST 1917

It is officially announced that Private George Bailey Jones of the Grenadier Guards has died of wounds received on 1st August, in France. The Chaplain has reported that Private Jones was shot through the head on 1st August and died in a Field Hospital the following morning without regaining consciousness. He was 34 years of age. He was buried in a little cemetery close to the field hospital. Private Jones leaves a widow and son who live in Thorneycroft Road. He enlisted in November of 1916 and had only been in France 8 weeks. Prior to the outbreak of the war he worked for Samuel Davis in New Buildings but before joining up commenced business with Mr S Hill, trading as Hill and Jones, Hosiery Manufacturers, Spencer Street, Hinckley. Private Jones was an accomplished violinist, being an associate of the London College of Music and was the first violinist of the Hinckley Musical and Dramatic Society. He was man of the most kindly disposition who delighted in rendering assistance to any good cause. A large number of townspeople will deeply deplore his loss.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £3 5s 2d on 20th April 1918 and a war gratuity of 33 on 18th November 1919. He died in the 64th Casualty Clearing Station.

 

 

Private Arthur Ernest Joyce 203614

Killed in Action 22nd April 1917

1/4th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Bay 5

Age 31

Born Calton, Notts Enlisted Hinckley

Nephew of Mrs Fish, 57 Coventry Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 9TH JUNE 1917

News has been received by his Aunt, Mrs Fish of 57 Coventry Road, that Private Arthur Ernest Joyce, of the Leicesters was killed n action on April 2nd. He was 31 years of age and had previously been wounded on the Somme. His leave after recovering from those wounds was spent with his friends in Hinckley. Before enlisting in 1915, Private Joyce was a carter at Hinckley Railway Station and lodged at the White Hart in the Borough. His father is in America.

Army Registers of Effects: His father, Mr John Joyce, received a payment of £4 14s 9d on 6th September 1918 and a war gratuity of£8 10s on 26th November 1919.

 

 

Pioneer Sydney Reuben Keen 317033

Died of Wounds 9th September 1918

L Signal Battalion Royal Engineers formerly 31606 Leicestershire Regiment

Heath Cemetery, Harbonieres, France

Plot 10 Row B Grave 4

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Age 20

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Reuben Keen and Mrs Fanny Keen, 16 Leicester Road, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel memorial, Hinckley

Hinckley Grammar School Memorial

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was at school

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His father received a payment of £7 17s 5d on 23rd November 1918 and a war gratuity of £9 10s on 1st December 1919. He died in the 41st Casualty Clearing Station.

 

Private Edmund Keene 10/160

Killed in Action 18th September 1916

A Company 10th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment

St. Vaast Post Military Cemetery

Plot 3 Row P Grave 18

Age 24

Son of Mr John Keene and Mrs Mary Elizabeth Keene, 52 Earl’s Road, Nuneaton.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first entered the Egyptian theatre of War on 22nd December 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received 2 payments: £5 5s 1d on 28th November 1916 and a payment of 9d on 25th September 1919. She received a war gratuity of £8 10s on 25th September 1919.

 

Private Ronald Anderson Kerr 40628

Killed in Action 24th September 1917

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Loos British Cemetery, France

Plot 20 Row F Grave 12

Age 21

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr William Kerr and Mrs Mary Ellen Kerr, Dalbeatie, Kirkcudbrightshire; Born in Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Hinckley Grammar School Memorial (now in Hinckley and District Museum)

1911 Census: He was living at Braeside, Hollycroft, Hinckley, with his parents and was at school. He had 2 siblings – Kenneth and Phyllis.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Hinckley Grammar School Magazine, Autumn Term 1917

Ronald Kerr (1907 – 1911), enrolled on the outbreak of the war in the 2/5tjh battalion Leicestershire Regiment; trained at (chiefly) Luton and St. Albans; went through a special course in scouting; was sent to Dublin and elsewhere in Ireland during the Sein Fein outbreak.

Army Registers of Effects: His mother received a payment of £36 5d on 27th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £10 10s on 19th January 1920.

 

Private Robert Henry Kiddle 358315

Died of Wounds 15th March 1918

1/10th The Kings (Liverpool Regiment)

Lapugnoy Military Cemetery, France

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Plot 8 Row B Grave 14

Age 20

Born Ilford Essex Enlisted London Living Liscard, Cheshire

He was the son of Mr John Henry Kiddle and Mrs Elizabeth Kiddle.

1911 Census: He was living at 20 Gaynesford Road, Forest Hill, London. He was at school and had 3 siblings – Thomas, Elizabeth and Catherine.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects:  His Father John received a payment of £5 17s on 8th June 1918 and a war gratuity of £7 10s on 22nd January 1920.

 

Lance-Corporal James King 32942

Died 15th January 1918

Royal Army Medical Corps attached Beima Naaha Officers Hospital

Basra War Cemetery, Iraq

Plot 1 Row G Grave 22

Age 23

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr William and Mrs Elizabeth King, 6 Grove Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Seamless Hosiery Hand. He had 6 siblings – Sarah, Mary, Florrie, Emma, John and Anne.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 20th January 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 16TH FEBRUARY 1918

Acting Lance-Corporal James King of the Royal Army Medical Corps has accidentally drowned in Mesopotamia on January 15th 1918, aged 23 years. Part of Lance-Corporal King’s duties was to proceed daily up the river to fetch the wounded to hospital and it is supposed that he met his death whilst carrying out these duties. He joined Kitchener’s army in September 1914 and served in France before going to Mesopotamia. He is the son of Mr and Mrs W King, 6 Grove Street, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £1 16s 10d on 1st March 1921.

 

Private Percy Bonsell King 240396

Killed in Action 21st March 1918

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Bay 5

Age 29

Born Hinckley Enlisted Loughborough Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Arthur and Mrs Catherine King, 49 Manor Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was a Hosiery Top Maker. He had 4 siblings – Elsie, Mary, Margery and Leslie.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 30th June 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 20TH APRIL 1918

Private Percy King of the Leicestershire Regiment was one of the first men to join Kitchener’s army. He was killed in action on 21st March 1918, aged 29 years, He was the son of Mr and Mrs King of Manor Street, Hinckley.

When war was declared Private King left his job at Atkins Bros. He was soon in France and for 3 years with the exception of a break for 3 months last year when he was wounded, he has always been in the front line.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £18 13s 8d on 28th June 1918 and a war gratuity of £17 on 19th April 1919.

 

Private Sidney Thomas Kirkham 22464

Killed in Action 8tth September 1918

36th Company Labour Corps formerly 67222 7th Infantry Labour Battalion Durham Light Infantry

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, Belgium

Plot 28 Row D Grave 22A

Mentioned on family grave in Hinckley Cemetery

Age 36

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Arthur Kirkham and Mrs Ann Elizabeth Kirkham; Husband of Mrs Clara Emma Kirkham, 30 Factory Road, Hinckley. Native of Hinckley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £7 4d on 28th November 1918 and a war gratuity of £6 10s on 3rd December 1919.

His name was originally missed off Hinckley War Memorial but was added in October 2005.

 

Lance-Corporal Samuel Albert Kirkland 7259

Killed in Action 21st October 1914

1st Battalion South Wales Borderers

Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing, Ypres, Belgium

Born Stoke Golding Enlisted Nuneaton

Son of Mr John Kirkland and Mrs Ada Kirkland of Stoke Golding; Husband of Mrs Maud Kirkland, 20 Manor Street, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his sister and brother in law, Rose and Thomas Chamberlain at the School House, Stoke Golding. He was employed as a Fitter.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star. He first went to France on 27th August 1914.

 

Sergeant Albert Kelsey Knight 9852

Killed in Action 18th November 1916

2nd Battalion Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

Wagon Road Cemetery, Beaumont Hamel, France

Plot 1 Row C Grave 18

Born Hinckley Enlisted Leicester

1911 Census: He was a soldier

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 15th January 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His sisters, Lily E Raske and Helen Holt received payments of £18 1s 8d and a war gratuity of £8 each on 22nd November 1919.

 

Private Stephen Ladkin 58466

Killed in Action Wednesday 26th September 1917

175th Company Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) formerly 31388 Leicestershire Regiment.

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Belgium

Age 27

Born Earl Shilton Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs. Edith M Parker (formerly Ladkin), “Rothesay”, Rutland Avenue, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley

SS Simon and Jude Church Memorial, Earl Shilton.

Ancient Order of Foresters Memorial (Leicester)

1911 Census: He was living at 19 Manor Street, Hinckley and was employed as a Hosiery Hand Winder.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £2 9s 11d on 2nd February 1918 and a war gratuity of £5 on 11th November 1919.

 

 

Private James Joseph Lathbury 31286

Killed in Action 22nd March 1918

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Arras Memorial to the Missing, France

Bay 5

Age 34

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Lathbury, of Nuneaton, Warwickshire; husband of Florence Gertrude Lathbury, nee Bass, of 24, Mill Hill Rd., Hinckley, Leicestershire.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: His address is given as Church View, Church Road, Stockingford, Nuneaton. He was single and was employed as a Colliery Motor Driver Stationery (below ground)

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

According to family legend, from an eyewitness account, he was taken to a First Aid Post, having been shot in the head, when the area was subject to shell explosions and he was killed. He was employed by Sketchley Ltd as a Dyer’s sorter.

Army Registers of Effects: His widow received a payment of £15 5s 1-d on 7th October 1919 which included a war gratuity of £10.

 

Private Edward Arthur Lee 61769

Killed in Action 26th February 1917

136th Company Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) formerly 21022 Leicestershire Regiment

Basra Memorial, Iraq

Panel 41

Age 24

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Edward and Mrs Amelia Lee, Fireman’s Row, Queens Park, Hinckley.

St Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: His address is given as 8 Queens Park Terrace a his occupation as a Hosiery Rib Hand. He had four sisters.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

St Peter’s Parish Magazine – April 1917

Whilst our last issue was in the press we heard with regret of the death in action of Private Edward Arthur Lee of the 10th Leicesters (Machine Gun Section). He was with the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force, having left England in May last and it is believed that he fell in the fighting on the Tigris, which resulted in the capture of Kut-al-Amara on February 24th, the official notice announcing his death to have taken place on the 22nd. Private Lee had been in the army about a year and a half, having enlisted in August 1915. He was in his twenty-fifth year and was the only son of Mr and Mrs E Lee who are certain of the sympathy and prayers of our readers. It is some consolation to them to know from a letter dated 22nd January last, and received two days before the sad news, that he had been able to get to Mass again and to his duties. He wrote that he was expecting to return to the trenches “in a day or two” – RIP.

A Mass, subscribed for by the members of the Catholic Club, was recently said for the repose of his soul.

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – July 1917

Particulars have been received during the past fortnight as to how Private Edward Arthur Lee met his death in February last whilst with the Leicesters in Mesopotamia. Private A Lewis of the 136 Company Machine Gun Corps, writing on April 29th states that the night previous to going over the parapet he had a long talk with Private Lee, as their section had been “told off” to go with the first line. As he had been “over” so many times he advised his young comrade as to what to do. “But” he continues,” I forgot to tell him not to volunteer to do anything once he was over safely because it was his first time in an attack  and I have seen so many young chaps killed, whereas men with experience would get through all right. Well, after he had got over safely, he went back with a message and got to our first line all right, where I saw him. One part of the line had been over but had been pushed back. I asked him if he was going over again with me and he said that he was going to wait a little while, until he got his breath back. That was the last I saw of him alive. Well, by all accounts he was given two boxes of ammunition to take back with him and was killed after he had gone three parts of the way. He was reported “Missing” at first and then “Killed”. As soon as I heard that I went to the First Aid Station and saw him. The bullet had entered his lower jaw from the left to right and he must have been killed outright – not like some of the other poor fellows…He was my little chum and he was liked by everyone in the company – RIP.

HINCKLEY TIMES 7TH APRIL 1917

The death took place on February 22nd off Private Edward Arthur Lee, whilst I t Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force. Private Lee of the Leicestershire Regiment, Machine Gun Section, was 24 years of age and was the only son of Mr and Mrs Edward Lee of Fireman’s Row, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects:  His mother received two payments of £3 4s 6d on 17th July 1917 and 11s 4d on 21st may 1918. She also received a war gratuity of £6 on 27th October 1919.

 

Private Lance Liggins 25046

Killed in Action 4th October 1916

7th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Panels 90 to 92 and 162 to 162A

Age 27

Son of Mr Joseph Liggins and Mrs Mary Charlotte Liggins, 11 Rugby Road, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Hosiery Trimmer. He had 1 sibling – Frederick

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £1 2s 8d on 28th February 1918 and a war gratuity of £6 on 10th December 1919.

 

 

Private Ernest Harry Linney 41811

Killed in Action 2nd September 1918

1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles formerly S/4/042517 Royal Army Service Corps

Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery, Belgium

Plot 4 Row G Grave 20

Age 26

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Joseph Linney and Mrs Eleanor Linney, 66 Coventry Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 66 Walton Terrace, Coventry Road, Hinckley. He was employed as a Bakers Man. He had 4 siblings – Emma,  Frederick, Walter and John

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES

Official news was received by his parents, Mr and Mrs Linney of 66 Coventry Road, Hinckley, of the death in action with the Royal Irish Fusiliers on 2nd September 1918 of Private Ernest Linney who succumbed to a sniper after three years of hard service in France. Private Linney who was 25 years of age was shortly expecting to come home to be married and much sympathy was felt for his fiancée as ell as for his parents in their bereavement. The deceased was a highly respected youth and for many years, indeed since he left school, held a situation at Messrs Squires, Bakers in King Street, Hinckley. He joined the Army Service Corps in January of 1915 and transferred to the infantry after service in France. He was the brother of the late Tom Linney, a well-known local footballer, who fell in the notorious Delville Wood, exactly 2 years ago. Mr and Mrs Linney have another son, Walter and two sons-in-law in the thick of the fighting.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £1 19s 10d on 13th January 1919 and a war gratuity of £19 2d on 10th December 1919.

 

Private Frederick Thompson Linney 23700

Killed in Action 30th September 1916

7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Serre Road Cemetery No2, Beaumont-Hamel, France

Plot 24 Row E Grave 6

Age 28

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Brother of the above.

Son of Mr Joseph Linney and Mrs Eleanor Linney 66 Walton Terrace, Coventry Road, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Beatrice Linney, 64 Thorneycroft Road, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He lived with his parents and was employed as a Plumber working for Mr Abbott of the Borough, Hinckley. He had 4 siblings – Emma, Ernest, Walter, John

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He attested on 8th December 1915 and was mobilised on 21st December 1915. He was posted to the 10th Reserve Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. He was appointed an unpaid Lance-Corporal on 1st May 1916 being promoted to the paid post on 1st June 1916. Due to being absent he reverted to Private on 5th July 1916. On 27th August 1916 he was posted to the 7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment.

HINCKLEY TIMES 9TH DECEMBER 1916

Private Frederick Linney, the well-known Hinckley footballer, fell in action on the Somme on September 30th 1916, aged 28 years. He played for Hinckley United in the Leicestershire Senior League. He was in the Hinckley Territorials for four years. He enlisted in December 1915 and went to France about 4 months ago. He worked for Mr. J Abbott in the Borough, as a plumber. He was married with three children.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £3 11s 7d on 13th February 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 30th September 1919.

 

 

Private George William List 21960

Died of Wounds 28th August 1917

11th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, Belgium

Plot 18 Row C Grave 14A

Age 21

Born Earl Shilton Enlisted Hinckley

Son of George List and Mrs Eliza List, 58 Lower Bond Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Hosiery Hand Warehouseman. He had 9 siblings – Lucy, Beatrice, Ethel, Alfred, Charles, John, Ada, Leslie and Edna.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 15TH SEPTEMBER 1917

It is officially announced that Private George William List of the Leicestershire Regiment (North Midland Pioneers) has died of wounds in France on August 28th 1917.

Private List was acting as a guide to a party of men who were proceeding up the line. It was a very wet morning with low cloud when a German aeroplane dropped a bomb, wounding every man in the party. Although badly wounded himself, Private List went to the nearest dressing station and guided the Doctor back to the scene of the disaster and then assisted in binding up his comrades’ wounds.

He was wounded in the left thigh and elbow and appeared to be recovering, until gas gangrene developed in his leg and he was not strong enough to face an amputation. He passed into unconsciousness and died without pain within two days of his 21st Birthday. Private List enlisted in October 1915 and went to France in May 1916. He was the only son of Mr and Mrs G List of 58 Lower Bond Street, Hinckley. Prior to enlistment he worked for Messrs Mason and Blakesley.

Army Register of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £3 8s on 24th November 1917 and a war gratuity of £8 10s on 18th June 1919.

 

Private Frederick Lockton 11797

Died of Wounds 17th August 1915

Helles Memorial to the Missing, Turkey

Panels 136 to 139

Born Cheltenham Enlisted Dorchester Living Hinckley

His name was originally missed of the Hinckley War Memorial but was added in October 2005.

1911 Census: He was living at Virginia House, Langton Matravers, Dorset and was boarding with the Bartlett family. He was employed as a domestic gardener.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to Gallipoli on 11thn July 1915.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife, Charlotte Florence Lockton received a payment of £1 6s 5d on 22nd December 1918 and a war gratuity of £3 on 7th July 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal George Lovell 9130

MILITARY MEDAL

Killed in Action 15th September 1916.

1st Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Guillemont Road Cemetery, Guillemont, France

Plot 5 Row G Grave 3

Age 22

Born Hinckley Enlisted London Living Hinckley

Son of Mr Charles Lovell of Nuneaton. Native of Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal. He first went to France on 9th September 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES

It is reported that Lance-Corporal George Lovell of the Leicestershire Regiment has been killed in action on 15th September 1916 aged 22 years

George Lovell had served for 6 years with the colours. He was mentioned in Despatches by General French for gallantry on September 10th 1915, near Weljte, Ypres, Belgium. He has received a posthumous award of the Military Medal. The deceased is the son of Mr and Mrs Lovell of the “Three Horseshoes”, Stoke Golding.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £23 5s 4d on 22nd January 1917 and a war gratuity of £12 on 2nd August 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal John Mackey 40975

Killed in Action 290th September 1917

8th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment formerly 26069 Lincolnshire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Age 30

Born Leicester Enlisted Wood Green, London

Son of Mr John Thomas Mackey and Mrs Ruth Mackey; Husband of Mrs Mary Ethel Mackey, 9 Duke Street, Hinckley.

St. Peter’s Roman Catholic Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of 13/8d on 28th October 1918 and a wr gratuity of £4 10s on 10th November 1919.

 

Private Sydney Thomas Mannion T/419564

Died 11th September 1918

Royal Army Service Corps formerly 17642 Scottish Rifles

Section 14 Grave 62

Born in Hinckley Enlisted Nuneaton Living in Nuneaton

Age 21

Son of Mr Patrick and Mrs Mary Winifred Mannion

St Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He lived at 10 Tan Yard, Druid Street, Hinckley. His occupation was given as Hosiery Hand Turner. He had a brother Bernard and a sister Ellen.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star.

HIINCKLEY TIMES

It is announced that Private Sydney Mannion has died on September 0th 1918 at the Norfolk War Hospital, Thorpe, Norwich, aged 21 years. The funeral took place at Hinckley Cemetery. Private Mannion died as a result of yellow jaundice contracted whilst serving at Rouen. A firing party from Wigston attended the burial and the Rev Joseph F Mandy recited prayers at the graveside. Private Mannion was the youngest son of Mrs J Chamberlain of Nuneaton, formerly of Hinckley, and was connected with several families in Hinckley.

Private Mannion joined the Scottish Rifles (Cameronians) in the first week of 1915, one month before his 18th birthday. After 10 weeks training he was drafted to France without furlough and spent Easter Sunday in the trenches. He volunteered as a motor despatch rider and was transferred to the Army Service Corps (Motor Transport). At the time of his fatal illness he was in the packers and loaders section of the Army Service Corps. He came home on leave in December 1917 and returned to France on Christmas Eve. After being in hospital in France he was bought back to England about six weeks before his death. His condition was very grave from the outset but it was hoped that his youthful condition would conquer the malady.

Army Registers of Effects: The place of death is given as the Norfolk War Hospital, Thorpe, Norfolk. His mother, Mary W Chamberlain, received a sum of £7 6s 7d on 26th February 1919 and a war gratuity of £17 10s on 2nd December 1919.

 

 

Lance-Corporal Claude Mansfield 240925

Killed in Action 8th June 1917

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Bully-Grenay Communal Cemetery, British Extension, France

Plot 4 Row A Grave 8

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living at 5 Blockley’s Yard with his Mother, Mrs Mary Ann Mansfield and was employed as a Bricklayer’s Labourer.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 27th February 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 25TH AUGUST 1917

Lance-Corporal Claude Mansfield of the 1/5th battalion Leicestershire Regiment has been killed in action in France on 28th June, 1917. Lance-Corporal Mansfield was shot through the head whilst leading his section in an attack on the German trenches. He was killed instantly. His Officer writes that he was an excellent section commander, who had he lived would certainly have been recommended for the Military Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £3 1s on 15th December 1917 and a war gratuity of £12 on 29th October 1919.

 

Private Shirley Richardson Marshall 5807

Died 6th December 1918

1st Battalion Leinster Regiment

Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt

Plot Q Grave 153

Age 20

Son of Mr Frederick Marshall and Mrs Martha Ellen Marshall, 36 Hill Street, Hinckley.

Choir Memorial, St. Mary’s Church, Hinckley

1911 Census: He was living at Hill Top in Castle Donnington, Leics and was at school. He had 6 siblings – Mabel, Winnifred, Hubert, Constance, Kathleen and Phyllis.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £24 11s 10d on 28th July 1919 which included a war gratuity of £12.

 

Private Samuel Marshall 19163

Killed in Action 18th November 1916

10th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Thiepval Memorial to the Missing, France

Pier 9 Face A Pier 10 face B

Age 29

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr William Marshall and Mrs Eliza Marshall, Hinckley; Husband of Mrs Ada Nellie Marshall, Hinckley.

St. Paul’s Church Memorial, Hinckley (now in St. Mary’s Church, Hinckley)

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 88 Castle Street, Hinckley with his Mother and was employed as a Grocer’s Shop Assistant. He had 1 sibling – Mabel.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects:  His wife received a payment of £2 3s 2d on 12th March 1918 and a war gratuity of £3 on 31st March 1920.

 

Able Seaman Thomas Martin Bristol Z/5596

Lost at Sea 8th September 1917 Killed in a mine explosion off Start Point

S S Newham

Plymouth Naval Memorial

Panel 24

Age 20

Son of Mr William Martin and Mrs Minnie Martin, 87Derby Road, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at 87 Derby Road, Hinckley with his parents and was employed as a needle maker. He had 7 siblings – William, Bert. Lewis, Lance, Edith, Jane and Hilda.

Service Record: He was born on 7th October 1896 and was employed as a Needle Maker. He stood 5ft 7 inches. He was engaged for service on 10th February 1917. He served on HMS Victory VI, HMS Excellent and HMS President III.

HINCKLEY TIMES 6TH OCTOBER 1917

It is reported that Able Seaman Tom Martin has been lost at sea on September 8th, 1917, aged 20 years. A/B Seaman Martin lost his life whilst serving as a Gunner on board a steamship that was sunk on September 8th. The Admiralty stated that he was not one of the survivors landed and therefore regarded him as dead. Tom Martin would have become 21 this coming Sunday and joined the Royal Navy 8 months ago. He was formerly a member of the Primitive Methodist Sunday School and worked for Messrs Tansey, Needle Manufacturers, of Nuneaton.

 

Private William Martin 22944

Killed in Action 7th September 1917

135th Company Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) formerly 1987 Leicestershire Regiment

Philosophe British Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row V Grave 33

Age 25

Brother of the above.

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents, Mr William Martin and Mrs Minnie Martin, at 87 Derby Road and had 7 siblings – Tom, Bert, Lewis, Lance, Edith, Jane and Hilda.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 28th February 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 6TH OCTOBER 1917

It is with regret that we announce the death of Private William Martin of the Machine Gun Corps, who was killed in action on September 7th 1917.

Early in the morning of September 7th, a shell exploded near the entrance to Private Martin’s dugout severely wounding him. He was taken to a Field Dressing Station only a few yards way but died half and hour later without regaining consciousness. He was 25 years of age. He was buried in a small cemetery for English soldiers, just behind the line.

Private Martin went over to France with the Hinckley Territorials in the early days of the war but later transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. In April 1917 William Martin refused a Commission. He was formerly employed at A E Hawley, Sketchley Dyeworks.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £5 7s on 11th March 1918 and a war gratuity of £14 on 8th November 1919.

 

Lance-Corporal James Martin 8300

Killed in Action 29th January 1915

2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Le Touret Memorial to the Missing, Richebourg L’Avoue, France

Panel 11

Age 37

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr and Mrs Martin, Upper Castle Street, Hinckley.

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914 Star. He first went to France on 12th October 1914.

HINCKLEY TIMES 19TH JUNE 1915

It is officially announced that Lance-Corporal J Martin of the 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment was killed in action on May 15th. A Hinckley man, whose parents (now dead) some years ago lived in Upper Castle Street, Martin had been in the army several years, six in India. He went to France with the Expeditionary Force from India and took part in many engagements. Last December he was wounded at La Bassee and on that occasion visited relatives in Hinckley. Martin, who was a single man, was 37 years of age. According to a letter received from one of his comrades he was shot in the head and died immediately.

Army Registers of Effects: His sister, Mrs Annie Smith received a payment of £16 7s 1d on 31st December 1915 and a war gratuity of £5 on 21st September 1919.

 

Private Albert Mason 40501

Died of Wounds 4th February 1918

7th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment formerly 27793 Leicestershire Regiment

Caudry Military Cemetery, Caudry, France

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley Son of Albert and Mary Mason, 44 Charles Street, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Unitarian Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: Living at 44 Charles Street, Hinckley with his family. He had 7 sisters – Sarah, Gert, Annie, Elsie, Florence, Kathleen and Norah and three brothers – William, Thomas and Horace. His occupation is recorded as counterman in a warehouse.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

International Red Cross: Prisoner of War records show that he was captured and died in a reserve field hospital at Caudry in German hands. The record shows that he died of a gunshot wound to the right lung. He is given as serving in E Company.

British army pension records show that his death was notified on 4th June 1918 and that his widow Ellen Sophia received a pension of £5. His date of birth is given as 31st January 1886.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar – March 1917

Private Albert Mason has been invalided home from France and is now at the Southern General Hospital, Stourbridge, suffering from frostbite. We are glad to know that he is progressing satisfactorily.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar – April 1918

Private Albert Mason was officially reported missing since the beginning of February.

Great Meeting Chapel – Monthly Calendar – July 1918

Whilst we were awaiting further reports information has come to hand that Private Albert Mason, 8th South Staffs, died of wounds on February 4th 1918, in a field hospital at Caudry. We extend our deep sympathy to Mrs Mason, hoping that better and more definite news will come soon.

Great Meeting Chapel Funeral Registers: Ellen Sophie Mason, died 7th October 1973, aged 87 years. She lived at 2 Baines Lane and at Woodmarket House, Lutterworth. There was a service in the chapel followed by internment at Hinckley Cemetery on 12th October 1973. Mrs Mason was from the Norton family, who were Chapel keepers many years ago. All her life had been spent in the Chapel area, living in Chapel houses and working for Atkins Bros. Only in the final years did she take enforced leave, first to hospital and then to a residential home in Lutterworth. Even then she paid her rent on 2 Baines Lane. Her husband was killed in the 1st World War.

Army Register of Effects: A payment of £7 8s 8d was paid to his widow on 25th September 1918 and a war gratuity of £8 was paid on 21st November 1919.

 

 

 

 

Private Arthur John Mason 240689

Died of Wounds 21st June 1917

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Noeux- les-Mines Communal Cemetery, France

Plot 2 Row B Grave 29

Age 20

Enlisted Hinckley

Grandson of Charlotte Mason, 64 Queens Road, Hinckley

St. Peter’s Church Memorial, Hinckley

1911 Census: His address is given as 64 Queens Road, where he lives with his grandparents and five sisters. His occupation is given as stocking leg maker.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star.

St. Peter’s Parish Magazine – July 1917

On Friday the 22nd, Mrs C Mason receive a telegram from the Officer in Charge, Territorial Records, Litchfield, stating that her grandson, Private Arthur John Mason, of the 1/5th Leicesters, was lying dangerously ill in the 7th Casualty Clearing Station and three days later a further telegram was received stating that he had died, the cause being gas poisoning. The death had taken place on June 21st and the following day he was buried in the cemetery at Noeux-les-Mines by Rev M J Owens CF. Private Mason, who would have been 21 years old this month, enlisted just before Christmas 1914. After being in France for about twelve months he was wounded in the left arm at Gommecourt and passed some months in hospitals in France and the Isle of Wight, paying a visit to Hinckley last September during convalescence. He returned to France last March. We offer his relatives our sincere regrets – RIP.

HINCKLEY TIMES JULY 1918

Private Arthur John Mason of the Leicestershire Regiment has been killed in action in France on 21st June 1917. Private Mason enlisted in 1914 and had previously served in France, being wounded at Gommecourt. After hospitalisation in France and the Isle of Wight, he returned to France in March 1917. Before joining up he was employed by Wood and Wheatley, of Hill Street. He was a member of St. Peter’s Church. His grandmother who was notified of his death, lives at 64 Queens Road, Hinckley, Mrs C Mason.

Army Register of Effects: His place of death is given as 7th Casualty Clearing Station, France. His grandmother received a payment of £10 3s 10d on 7th November 197 and also a war gratuity of £12 10s on 28th October 1919.

 

 

Rifleman Eric Oscar Mason S/19019

Killed in Action 19th November 1917

2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Age 27

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Arthur Mason and Mrs Letitia Mason; Husband of Mrs Maud Annie Wildbore (formerly Mason), 11 The Lawns, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living at Hinckley Road, Stoke Golding with his parents and was employed as a Rivetter. He had 4 siblings - Arthur, Cyril, Kathleen and Reginald. He had a half-sister, Kathleen.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He attested on 11th December 1915 and was mobilised on 15th May 1916. He married Maud Annie Hipwell on 26th September 1912. They had 3 children – Stella Maud (7/3/13), Bernard Eric (16/10/14) and Annie (11/1/17). He was posted to the 6th Battalion Rifle Brigade on 20th May 1916. He joined the 2nd Battalion on 27th September 1916. He was given 5 days Field Punishment No2 on 30th November 1916 for a dirty rifle. On 3rd March 1917 he was given 5 days Field Punishment No2 for being dirty when on active duty. He was awarded 10 days Field Punishment No2 for being absent from parade, on 13th April 1917. He first went to France on 27th September 1916. On 13th October 1916 he was admitted to the 2nd General Hospital with inflamed tonsils. He proceeded to his unit in the field on 5th November 1916. On 11th June 1916 he was admitted to the 26th Field Ambulance with a septic heel and was transferred the next day to the 15th casualty Clearing Station. Then he was transferred to the 14th General Hospital with the same complaint on 27th June 1917. He rejoined his unit on 7th September 1917. He was granted leave to England from 25th October 1917 to 4th November 1917.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £15 3s 6d on 15th March 1918 and a war gratuity of £6 10s on 12th November 1919.

 

Private George Mason 35250

Killed in Action 4th October 1917

12/13th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Age 36

Born Hinckley

Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Joseph Mason and Mrs Ann Mason, 41 Dares Walk, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Seamless Hosiery Hand. He had 2 siblings – Sarah and Ethel

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 22ND SEPTEMBER 1917

Private George Mason of the Northumberland Fusiliers whose home is at 41 Dares Walk, Hinckley, was killed in action in France on October 4th. He was 36 years of age.

Army Registers of Effects: His father received a payment of £3 1s 8d on 23rd February 1918 and a war gratuity of £6 10s on 25th November 1919.

 

Private William Maw 240183

Killed in Action 11th October 1918

1/5th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Busigny Communal Cemetery Extension, France

Plot 4 Row A Grave 10

Age 26

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Thomas Maw and Mrs Sarah Maw, 105 Derby Road, Hinckley.

Baptist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Hosiery Hand. He had 4 siblings – Edith, Gladys, George and Clara.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 23RD NOVEMBER 1918

Mr T Maw of 105 Derby Road, Hinckley, has been notified that his son Private W Maw of the 1/5th Leicesters was killed in action on October 11th, at the age of 26.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £13 3d on 19th March 1919 and a war gratuity of £15 10s on 9th December 1919.

 

Private Percy Mawby 20827

Killed in Action 1st October 1917

7th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, Passchendaele, Belgium

Panels 50 and 51

Age 25

Born North Kilworth Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Alfred Mawby and Mrs Mary Jane Mawby, 13 Mansion Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Primitive Methodist Chapel Memorial, Hinckley

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents at 112 Trinity Lane and was employed as a Baker’s Assistant. He had 5 siblings – Allen, George, Gertrude, Margaret and William.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal (now in Hinckley and District Museum)

HINCKLEY TIMES 10TH NOVEMBER 1917

Mrs Mawby of 13 Mansion Street has been notified that her son Private Percy Mawby of the Leicesters was killed in action in France on October 1st.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £1 3s 2d on 23rd February 1918 and a war gratuity of £9 on 17th November 1919.

 

Private Samuel J Mayne 27876

Killed in Action 10th April 1918

1/5th Battalion The Kings Own (Royal Lancaster) Regiment

Choques Military Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row M Grave 36

Age 36

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Son of Mr Samuel Mayne and Mrs Susan Mayne; Husband of Mrs Eliza Mayne, Hinckley.

United Reformed Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Service Record: He was living at 30 ½ Castle Street, Hinckley and was described as a Shopkeeper. He attested on 11th December 1915 and was mobilised on 31st August 1916. He stood 5ft 10 inches. He married Eliza Harris on 6th August 1910. Their children were: Stanley (17th August 1912), Edward John (5th February 1914) and Olive (3rd April 1917). He was posted as Private on 2nd September 1916 and went to France on 22nd December 1915.He was transferred to his regiment on 20th May 1917. He was wounded in action on 4th April 1917 with a gunshot wound to the left leg. He was admitted to the 15th Casualty Clearing Station and then to the 10th General Hospital at Rouen. He spent 94 days in hospital. He rejoined his unit on 29th January 1918. His wife received a separation allowance of 28/- per week. To be paid up to 27th October 1918. From 28th October 1918 she received a pension of 29/7d per week. He had been granted leave from 4th August 1917 to 13th August 1917. Personal effects of an identity disc were returned to the family.

HINCKLEY TIMES 11TH MAY 1918

Private Samuel Mayne of the Kings Own Royal Lancashire Regiment was killed in action in France on April 10th 1918. He leaves a widow and three children. He was formerly proprietor of the chip potato saloon at 30 Castle Street. The Chaplain wrote saying that he was killed defending the stores which had been left in his charge. He was buried at a beautiful cemetery. He was 36 years of age. Private Mayne joined the army in August 1916.

Army Registers of Effects: His wife received a payment of £5 1s 1d on 3rd July 1918 and a war gratuity of £7 on 28th November 1919.

 

Private William Richard Meigh 41541

Killed in Action 8th October 1918

9th Battalion Norfolk Regiment

Montbrehain British Cemetery, France

Age 26

Enlisted Hinckley Living Leicester

Son of the late Mr Thomas Meigh and Mrs Caroline Meigh, 102 Factory Road, Hinckley.

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Shoe Hand – Heel Builder. He had 5 siblings – Walter, Arthur, Clara, Ada and Lily.

Medal Card Index: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

Army Registers of Effects: His Father received a payment of £7 10s 9d on 25th February 1919 and a war gratuity of £3 on 223nd December 1919.

 

Private Bert Merrick 17605

Killed in Action 7th January 1916

2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Basra Memorial to the Missing, Iraq

Panel 12

Born Hinckley Enlisted Loughborough Living Hinckley

Son of Mrs Sarah Ann Merrick, 6 Blockley’s Yard, Regent Street, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his parents and was employed as a Shoe Hand. He had 4 siblings.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1914-1915 Star. He first went to France on 8th October 1915.

HINCKLEY TIMES 12th FEBRUARY 1916

Official news has been received that Private Bert Merrick a Hinckley soldier belonging to the 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment was killed in action during the fighting in the Persian Gulf in January.

The son of Mr and Mrs Daniel Merrick of Blockley’s Yard, Regent Street, he was 20 years of age. He enlisted with the 3rd Leicesters last March and was transferred to the 2nd Battalion in August, afterwards proceeding to France and later Egypt.

He was a highly respected youth and an enthusiastic Scout, being patrol leader of the Holy Trinity Company. He revelled in the life of a soldier and was always in an optimistic mood when writing home. Before enlisting he was employed in the heel department of Messrs B W & C Wills, Boot and Shoe Manufacturers, Trinity Lane, Hinckley.

Army Registers of Effects: His Mother received a payment of £3 14s 8d on 31st January 1917 and a war gratuity of £3 on 19th August 1919.

 

Private Daniel Merrick 31558

Died 30th March 1918

8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment

Le Cateau Military Cemetery, France

Plot 1 Row A Grave 18

Age 33

Born Hinckley Enlisted Hinckley

Husband of Mrs Edith Emma Merrick, Manor Place, Hinckley.

Holy Trinity Church Memorial, Hinckley.

Leicestershire Roll of Honour (Leicester Cathedral)

1911 Census: He was living with his wife and his occupation was given as Cleaning. They had 3 children – William, Shirley and Florrie.

Medal Index Card: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

HINCKLEY TIMES 14TH DECEMBER 1918<